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  1. “Cemented with Diseased Qualities”: Sympathy and Comparison in Hume’s Moral Psychology.Gerald J. Postema - 2005 - Hume Studies 31 (2):249-298.
    Mandeville writes that it was said of Montaigne “that he was pretty well vers’d in the Defects of Man-kind, but unacquainted with the Excellencies of human Nature,” adding, “If I fare no worse, I shall think my self well used.” Mandeville transformed Montaigne’s suggestion into a methodology for his systematic attempt to “anatomize the invisible Parts of Man”. His tale of “the grumbling hive,” and his extensive commentary on it, were designed to demonstrate that “if Mankind could be cured of (...)
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  2. Moral Prejudices: Essays on Ethics.John Dunn - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):44.
  3. Cohon, Rachel . Hume's Morality: Feeling and Fabrication . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008 . Pp. 285. $75.00 (Cloth).John Corvino - 2010 - Ethics 120 (4):846-851.
  4. Book ReviewsRussell Hardin,. David Hume: Moral and Political Theorist. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 260. $49.50. [REVIEW]Matthew Simpson - 2008 - Ethics 118 (3):549-553.
  5. Walls and Vaults: A Natural Science of Morals.L. Besser-Jones - 2012 - Philosophical Review 121 (4):634-636.
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  6. Beyond Sympathy: Smith’s Rejection of Hume’s Moral Theory.Paul Sagar - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (4):681-705.
    Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments has long been recognized as importantly influenced by, and in part responding to, David Hume’s earlier ethical theory. With regard to Smith’s account of the foundations of morals in particular, recent scholarly attention has focused on Smith’s differences with Hume over the question of sympathy. Whilst this is certainly important, disagreement over sympathy in fact represents only the starting point of Smith’s engagement with – and eventual attempted rejection of – Hume’s core moral theory. (...)
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  7. The Possibility of Consent.David Owens - unknown
    Worries about the possibility of consent recall a more familiar problem about promising raised by Hume. To see the parallel here we must distinguish the power of consent from the normative significance of choice. I'll argue that we have normative interests, interests in being able to control the rights and obligations of ourselves and those around us, interests distinct from our interest in controlling the non-normative situation. Choice gets its normative significance from our non-normative control interests. By contrast, the possibility (...)
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  8. The Account of the Nature of Moral Evaluation in Hume's "Treatise".Páll S. Árdal - 1964 - Philosophy 39:341.
  9. The Moral Philosophy of David Hume. By R. David Broles. (Martinus Nijhoff; The Hague 1964. Pp. 97. Price 10.80 Guilders.). [REVIEW]Páll S. Árdal - 1965 - Philosophy 40 (154):354-355.
  10. Sympathy and Approbation in Hume and Smith: A Solution to the Other Rational Species Problem 1.David M. Levy & Sandra J. Peart - 2004 - Economics and Philosophy 20 (2):331-349.
    David Hume's sympathetic principle applies to physical equals. In his account, we sympathize with those like us. By contrast, Adam Smith's sympathetic principle induces equality. We consider Hume's “other rational species” problem to see whether Smith's wider sympathetic principle would alter Hume's conclusion that “superior” beings will enslave “inferior” beings. We show that Smith introduces the notion of “generosity,” which functions as if it were Hume's justice even when there is no possibility of contract.
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  11. Utility and Humanity: The Quest for the Honestum in Cicero, Hutcheson, and Hume: James Moore.James Moore - 2002 - Utilitas 14 (3):365-386.
    Hume considered An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals incomparably the best of all his writings. In the argument advanced here, I propose that Hume's preference for the Enquiry may be linked to his admiration of Cicero, and his work, De Officiis. Cicero's attempt to discover the honestum of morality in De Officiis had a particular relevance and appeal for philosophers of the early eighteenth century who were seeking to establish what they called the foundation of morality. One of those (...)
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  12. ‘Utility’ and the ‘Utility Principle’: Hume, Smith, Bentham, Mill.Douglas G. Long - 1990 - Utilitas 2 (1):12-39.
    David Hume, Adam Smith, Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill are often viewed as contributors to or participants in a common tradition of thought roughly characterized as ‘the liberal tradition’ or the tradition of ‘bourgeois ideology’. This view, however useful it may be for polemical or proselytizing purposes, is in some important respects historiographically unsound. This is not to deny the importance of asking what twentieth-century liberals or conservatives might find in the works of, say, David Hume to support their (...)
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  13. Adam Smith and David Hume: With Sympathy*: F. L. Van Holthoon.F. L. Van Holthoon - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (1):35-48.
    Why did Hume drop sympathy as a key concept of his moral philosophy, and why—on the other hand—did Smith make it into the ‘didactic principle’ of his Theory of Moral Sentiments? These questions confront us with the basic issue of ethical theory concerning human nature. My point in dealing with these questions is to show what views of human nature their respective choices involved. And my procedure will be to take a close look at the revisions they made to their (...)
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  14. David Hume: Moral and Political Theorist – Russell Hardin.James A. Harris - 2009 - Philosophical Quarterly 59 (235):362-365.
  15. Virtue by Consensus: The Moral Philosophy of Hutcheson, Hume and Adam Smith.Paul Russell - 1991 - Ethics 101 (4):873-875.
  16. Mind and Morality: An Examination of Hume’s Moral Psychology.Terence Penelhum - 1996 - Ethics 108 (3):630-633.
  17. Morals, Motivation and Convention: Hume's Influential Doctrines.Henry R. West - 1992 - Ethics 103 (1):166-167.
  18. Hume’s Conception of Character.John Bricke - 1974 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):107-113.
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  19. Hume’s Catalog of Virtue and Vice.William Davie - 1976 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):45-57.
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  20. The Rules for Dispositional Judgment in Hume’s Treatise.Walter Brand - 1992 - Southwest Philosophy Review 8 (2):1-11.
  21. Hurne on Human Excellence.Marie A. Martin - 1992 - Hume Studies 18 (2):383-399.
  22. Aesthetics and Morals in the Philosophy of David Hume. [REVIEW]Christopher Williams - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):109-113.
    In the opening chapter of this book, Timothy Costelloe develops an interpretation of Hume's doctrines in "Of the Standard of Taste" and then proceeds, in the second chapter, by extending that interpretation to Hume's moral philosophy. According to Costelloe, the "real value" of his attempt to clarify Hume's essay is to be found in the broader application. But since that value will not be real unless the interpretation of the essay has merit, the first chapter is clearly vital to the (...)
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  23. Thinking in Time in Hume’s Essays.Scott Black - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):3-23.
    This essay treats the final version of Hume’s Essays, Volume 1, as an artfully shaped whole. Framed by essays on taste that address the interaction of personal and social dynamics, the volume is organized into loose clusters of political and moral essays that share a common pattern of offering multiple approaches to the issues they examine and pursuing a given idea until it reaches a point of excess that generates a salutary correction. This activity circumscribes an inexact range of balance, (...)
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  24. Morality as a Back-Up System: Hume's View?Marcia Baron - 1988 - Hume Studies 14 (1):25-52.
  25. Hume’s Moral Sentiments As Motives.Rachel Cohon - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (2):193-213.
    Do the moral sentiments move us to act, according to Hume? And if so, how? Hume famously deploys the claim that moral evaluations move us to act to show that they are not derived from reason alone. Presumably, moral evaluations move us because they are, or are the product of, moral sentiments. So, it would seem that moral approval and disapproval are or produce motives to action. This raises three interconnected interpretive questions. First, on Hume’s account, we are moved to (...)
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  26. The Clarendon Edition of Hume’s Treatise: Book 1.John Bricke - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (2):297-304.
  27. Hume’s Morality: Feeling and Fabrication. [REVIEW]Sophie Botros - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):289-292.
    Hume's project, in Book 3 of the Treatise, of showing that virtue and vice are discerned by feeling, not reason, is notorious for its contradictions. Armies of Humean scholars have fought valiantly, ingeniously, but unsuccessfully, to resolve them, and in the first half of Hume's Morality, Cohon shows herself an admirably doughty follower in their footsteps. The second half concerns Hume's division between natural and artificial virtues. We learn how self-interest is redirected, and moral sentiment strengthened to provide artificial virtues (...)
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  28. A Very Brief Summary of Hume’s Morality: Feeling and Fabrication.Rachel Cohon - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):253-256.
    Earlier versions of the four articles which follow were presented at a book panel session, on Rachel Cohon's Hume's Morality: Feeling and Fabrication, at the Hume Society meetings in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in August 2009.I am deeply grateful to Lívia Guimarães and Donald L. M. Baxter for planning this session, and to Elizabeth S. Radcliffe and Don Garrett for serving as my critics. I have been asked to begin by summarizing my book in a few minutes.Hume's Morality: Feeling and Fabrication (...)
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  29. Feeling and Fabrication: Rachel Cohon’s Hume’s Morality.Don Garrett - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):257-266.
    Hume's Morality: Feeling and Fabrication 1 is a most useful and agreeable book. It contains a wealth of analysis, argument, and insight about many of the most central elements of the moral theory of one of the greatest moral philosophers in human history: David Hume. The book is well-conceived, well-argued, stimulating, informative, clear, precise, thorough, balanced, nuanced, and ingenious, while evincing—especially in its concluding chapter, when considering possible extensions of Hume's theory—a certain subtle but pleasing "warmth in the cause of (...)
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  30. The Notion of Moral Progress in Hume’s Philosophy: Does Hume Have a Theory of Moral Progress.Alix Cohen - 2000 - Hume Studies 26 (1):109-127.
    This paper aims to show that the notion of moral progress makes sense in Hume’s philosophy. And even though Hume suggests that this question is not central, in showing why it is not the case, I will conclude that, in concentrating on the question of the progress of civilisation, Hume was expressing a view on moral progress. To support this claim, I will begin by defending the claim that the notion of moral progress itself is consistent within Hume’s philosophical principles. (...)
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  31. Hume, Reason and Morality: A Legacy of Contradiction. [REVIEW]Alessio Vaccari - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):193-195.
  32. The Role of Political Economy in Hume’s Moral Philosophy.Carl Wennerlind - 2011 - Hume Studies 37 (1):43-64.
    Hume insisted that property serve as the foundation of society because it best promotes the greatest amount of industry and therefore contributes to public utility. Industry thus plays a central role in Hume’s theory of justice. Given that Hume extensively discussed the social, political, cultural, and moral implications of industry in the Political Discourses, I suggest that Hume’s economic writings should be understood as an integral part of his overall philosophical project. In offering a parallel reading of the Enquiry Concerning (...)
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  33. Hume’s Difficulty with the Virtue of Honesty.Rachel Cohon - 1997 - Hume Studies 23 (1):91-112.
  34. Correcting Our Sentiments About Hume’s Moral Point of View.Kate Abramson - 1999 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (3):333-361.
  35. Why Be Just?: Hume’s Response in the Inquiry.Michael J. Costa - 1984 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 22 (4):469-479.
  36. Morals, Motivation, and Convention: Hume's Influential Doctrines.Francis Snare - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 1991 book is about the continuing influence of Hume's ideas on moral and political philosophy. In part, it is a critical exegesis of Hume's most impressive and challenging doctrines in Book III of the Treatise of Human Nature on such topics as morals, motivation, justice, and social institutions. However, the main thrust of the argument is to throw into relief the importance of that discussion for contemporary philosophy. While the author subjects most contemporary defences of Humean doctrines to intense (...)
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  37. Religion and Faction in Hume's Moral Philosophy.Jennifer A. Herdt - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores Hume's concern with the destructiveness of religious factions and his efforts to develop, in his moral philosophy, a solution to factional conflict. Sympathy and the related capacity to enter into foreign points of view are crucial to the neutralization of religious zeal and the naturalization of ethics. Jennifer Herdt suggests that Hume's preoccupation with religious faction is the key which reveals the unity of his varied philosophical, aesthetic, political and historical works.
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  38. XV—Nature, Artifice and Moral Approbation.Christopher Cherry - 1975 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 76 (1):265-282.
    In Book III of A Treatise on Human Nature,' Hume puts two questions which he says are distinct. The first concerns "the manner in which the rules of justice are established by the artifice of men." The second concerns "the reasons which determine us to attribute to the observance or neglect of these rules a moral beauty and deformity." Whatever his sympathies, the reader is bound to be struck by the sustained ingenuity of Hume's answer to the first question. He (...)
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  39. Hume’s Moral Theory.J. L. Mackie - 1980 - Routledge.
    First Published in 1980. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  40. Hume: A Very Short Introduction.Alfred Ayer - 2000 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Hume is one of the greatest of all British philosophers, and even in his own lifetime was celebrated as one of the pivotal figures of the Enlightenment. Hume's 'naturalist' approach to a wide variety of philosophical topics resulted in highly original theories about perception, self-identity, causation, morality, politics, and religion, all of which are discussed in this stimulating introduction by A J Ayer, himself one of the twentieth century's most important philosophers. Ayer also gives an account of Hume's fascinating life (...)
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  41. Hume and Utilitarianism: Another Look at an Age-Old Question.Massimo Reichlin - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):1-20.
    The discussion on the relationship between Hume and utilitarianism has been lively for many decades. To contribute to this discussion, I identify four main features of a utilitarian view: a) a consequentialist theory of the right, b) a hedonist theory of the good, c) some kind of impartiality in evaluating consequences, and d) an essentially prescriptive, rather than merely explicative, attitude. I then show that, first, although he borrowed the word ‘utility’ from Hume, Bentham did not consider Hume as a (...)
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  42. Hume by Don Garrett. [REVIEW]John Bricke - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):172-173.
    Don Garrett’s Hume constitutes a demanding introduction to the entirety of Hume’s philosophy as articulated in the Treatise, the two Enquiries, and the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. Its goal is to provide a clear representation of the problems Hume addresses, the solutions he provides to those problems, and the arguments he constructs in so doing. Achieving its three goals remarkably well, Garrett’s Hume provides what, in my judgment, is the very best introduction to Hume’s philosophy available. It will be an (...)
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  43. David Hume and the “Politics of Humanity”.Ryan Patrick Hanley - 2011 - Political Theory 39 (2):205-233.
    Recently a call has gone up for a revival of the "politics of humanity." But what exactly is the "politics of humanity"? For illumination this paper turns to Hume's analysis of humanity's foundational role in morality and modern politics. Its aims in so doing are twofold. First, it aims to set forth a new understanding of the unity of Hume's practical and epistemological projects in developing his justifications for and the implications of his remarkable and underappreciated claim that humanity is (...)
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  44. John Rawls.Michael L. Frazer - 2007 - Political Theory 35 (6):756-780.
    John Rawls shares the Enlightenment's commitment to finding moral and political principles which can be reflectively endorsed by all individuals autonomously. He usually presents reflective autonomy in Kantian, rationalist terms: autonomy is identified with the exercise of reason, and principles of justice must be constructed which are acceptable to all on the basis of reason alone. Yet David Hume, Adam Smith and many other Enlightenment thinkers rejected such rationalism, searching instead for principles which can be endorsed by all on the (...)
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  45. Noble Infirmity.Andrew Sabl - 2006 - Political Theory 34 (5):542-568.
    The love of fame is a common theme in republican thought. But few, historically or now, have examined with rigor this sentiment's nature, purpose, and worth. The work of David Hume is an exception. Hume, this paper argues, dialectically took up not only all the classic reasons for loving fame--as spur to useful effort, motivator of virtue, consolation to virtue unrewarded, and safe harbor in the midst of historical flux--but the skeptical reasons for doubting that fame is attainable or that, (...)
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  46. Trust, Risk, and the Social Contract.Brian Skyrms - 2008 - Synthese 160 (1):21-25.
    The problem of trust is discussed in terms of David Hume's meadow-draining example. This is analyzed in terms of rational choice, evolutionary game theory and a dynamic model of social network formation. The kind of explanation that postulates an innate predisposition to trust is seen to be unnecessary when social network dynamics is taken into account.
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  47. Strength of Mind: Prospects and Problems for a Humean Account.Jane L. Mcintyre - 2006 - Synthese 152 (3):393-401.
    References to strength of mind, a character trait implying “the prevalence of the calm passions above the violent”, occur in a number of important discussions of motivation in the Treatise and the Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals. Nevertheless, Hume says surprisingly little about what strength of mind is, or how it is achieved. This paper argues that Hume’s theory of the passions can provide an interesting and defensible account of strength of mind. The paper concludes with a brief comparison (...)
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  48. Hume and Nature.A. B. Carter - 2002 - In Ethics in Practice: An Anthology. Oxford, UK: pp. 664-673.
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  49. As Relações Entre David Hume E o Utilitarismo/Relations Between David Hume and Utilitarianism.Gabriel Bertin de Almeida - 2013 - Natureza Humana 15 (1).
    O objetivo do presente artigo é discutir os vínculos existentes entre a teoria humeana e o Utilitarismo. Nesse contexto, mencionando a divergência existente entre os comentadores de Hume a respeito de seu lugar diante do Utilitarismo, conclui-se que, embora o caráter descritivo de fato predomine na teoria humeana, ela não é inteiramente desprovida de pretensão prescritiva. Será ainda necessário discutir em que consiste essa pretensão, isto é, o que ela busca prescrever.
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  50. Hume, Reason and Morality: A Legacy of Contradiction.Sophie Botros - 2005 - Routledge.
    Covering an important theme in Humean studies, this book focuses on Hume's hugely influential attempt in book three of his _Treatise of Human Nature _to derive the conclusion that morality is a matter of feeling, not reason, from its link with action. Claiming that Hume's argument contains a fundamental contradiction that has gone unnoticed in modern debate, this fascinating volume contains a refreshing combination of historical-scholarly work and contemporary analysis that seeks to expose this contradiction and therefore provide a significant (...)
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