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  1. O nieracjonalności potępiania samobójstwa w poglądach Davida Hume’a i Jamesa Hillmana.Joanna Smakulska - 2021 - Ruch Filozoficzny 76 (3):203.
  2. Honestum is as Honestum Does: Reid, Hume – and Mandeville?!Jeffrey Edwards - 2014 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 12 (1):121-143.
    How are we to understand Thomas Reid in relation to Bernard de Mandeville? I answer this question by considering two components of the assessment of Hume's theory of morals that Reid provides in his Essays on the Active Powers of Man: first, Reid's claim that Hume's system of morals cannot accommodate the Stoic conception of moral worth ; second, Reid's charge that Hume's account of morally meritorious action leads to an inflated and incoherent version of Epicurean virtue theory. I thus (...)
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  3. Hume's Lucianic Thanatotherapy.George Couvalis - 2013-14 - Modern Greek Studies (Australia and New Zealand) 16 (B):327-344.
    The eighteenth century philosopher David Hume was much influenced by Greek philosophy and literature. His favourite writer was the satirist Lucian. What is David Hume’s thanatotherapy (therapy of the fear of death)? Is he an Epicurean or Pyrrhonian thanatotherapist? I argue that, while he is in part an Epicurean who is sceptical about his Epicureanism, he is primarily a Lucianic thanatotherapist. A Lucianic thanatotherapist uses self and other deprecating irony as a form of therapy. He also ruthlessly satirises religious consolations. (...)
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  4. Hume's Place in the History of Ethics.Annette Baier - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 399.
    This chapter begins with a description of the general character of Hume's ethics, which are Epicurean in that he assumes that pleasure is good, and every good thing is pleasing. All virtues, for him, are ‘agreeable or useful’ to their possessor or to others, and the useful is defined as what can be expected to yield future pleasure. The discussion then covers Hume's views on sympathy and the principles governing our approbations; trust and its enlargement by social ‘artifices’; natural virtues, (...)
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  5. A 'Sensible Knave'? Hume, Jane Austen and Mr Elliot.Charles R. Pigden - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (3):465-480.
    This paper deals with what I take to be one woman’s literary response to a philosophical problem. The woman is Jane Austen, the problem is the rationality of Hume’s ‘sensible knave’, and Austen’s response is to deepen the problem. Despite his enthusiasm for virtue, Hume reluctantly concedes in the EPM that injustice can be a rational strategy for ‘sensible knaves’, intelligent but selfish agents who feel no aversion towards thoughts of villainy or baseness. Austen agrees, but adds that ABSENT CONSIDERATIONS (...)
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  6. Hume e as teorias morais vulgares.Marco Antonio Oliveira de Azevedo - 2011 - Princípios 18 (29):321-338.
    Quais sáo as teorias vulgares da moralidade criticadas por Hume na famosa passagem is-ought ? Quais eram seus defensores? Neste ensaio, trato de algumas diferenças entre Hume e Hutcheson que podem iluminar algumas respostas. Hume, ao contrário de Hutcheson, combateu toda forma de separaçáo da natureza humana em componentes naturais e divinos. O conceito de simpatia cumpre uma funçáo essencial nesse aspecto. Há bons indícios de que o jovem Hume adotou no Tratado uma estratégia abertamente crítica a todas as teorias (...)
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  7. A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 1: Texts.David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press UK.
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This first volume contains the critical text of David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature, followed by the shortin which Hume set out the key arguments of the larger work; the volume concludes with A Letter from a Gentleman to his Friend in Edinburgh, Hume's defence of the Treatise when it was under attack from ministers seeking to prevent Hume's appointment as Professor of (...)
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  8. Phases of the ethical judgement viewed from a viewpoint of motivism.Yusuke Kaneko - 2009 - Dissertation Submitted to the University of Tokyo 1:1-159.
    Although written in Japanese, 動機説の観点から見た倫理的判断の諸相(Phases of the ethical judgement)has formed my original ideas on action theory, ethics, and so on.
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  9. Delicate Magnanimity: Hume on the Advantages of Taste.Margaret Watkins - 2009 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (4):389 - 408.
    This article argues that Hume's brief essay, "Of the Delicacy of Taste and Passion," offers resources for three claims: (1) Delicate taste correlates with self-sufficiency and thus with a particularly Humean form of Magnanimity -- greatness of mind; (2) Delicate taste improves the capacity for profound friendships, characterized by mutual admiration and true compassion; and (3) magnanimity and compassion are thus not necessarily in tension with one another and may even proceed from and support harmony of character. These claims, in (...)
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  10. Is the Self in Hume Overmoralized?Michael D. Garral - 2007 - Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 32 (1):165-183.
    Despite being averse to moral extravagance, Hume’s own conception of morality threatens to be too demanding and his view of human life to be too moralistic. The problem lies in the scope (and concomitantly the content) Hume assigns morality, the effect of which is the apparent exclusion of the morally indifferent and the morally supererogatory. This threatens to render the normative dimension of Hume’s account problematic. Sufficiently problematic to overmoralize the self? That is the question this essay seeks to motivate.
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  11. Impressions of Hume.Marina Frasca-Spada & P. J. E. Kail (eds.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Impressions of Hume collects brand-new essays from leading scholars in different philosophical, historiographical, and literary traditions within which Hume is a canonical figure. To some his writings are vehicles for intuitions, problems, and arguments which are at the center of contemporary philosophical reflection; others locate Hume's views against the background of concerns and debates of his own time. Hume's texts may be read as highly sophisticated literary-cum-philosophical creations, or as moments in the construction of the ideology of modernity; these are (...)
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  12. Utilidad y espectáculo moral en David Hume.Luis Figueroa - 2004 - Cuadrante Phi.
    "It seems so natural a thought to ascribe to their utility the praise, which we bestow on the social virtues, that one would expect to meet with this principle every where in moral writers, as the chief foundation of their reasoning and enquiry". Even the difficulty of accounting the effects of usefulness or its contrary might have induced philosophers to rather employing any other principle in order to explain Morals genesis, the confirmation by experience in the theater of the world (...)
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  13. Hobbes and Hume on Promising.Martin Bertman - 2002 - Vera Lex 3 (1/2):63-90.
  14. Philosophical Melancholy and Delirium: Hume's Pathology of Philosophy.Marina Frasca-Spada - 2001 - Mind 110 (439):783-789.
  15. A Humean Naturalistic Moral Theory.Augustine Yaw Frimpong-Mansoh - 2001 - Dissertation, University of Alberta (Canada)
    This thesis is a Humean dialogue with David Hume on his influential ideas that are of contemporary philosophical influence and importance, in particular his ideas on the relation between morality and science. It interprets Hume's view of science in terms of his theory of causation and examines the connection that his causal theory of scientific explanation bears with his moral theory. The connection that Hume's causal theory bears with his moral theory has not been sufficiently appreciated and given a serious (...)
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  16. Précis of Cognition and Commitment in Hume’s Philosophy. [REVIEW]Don Garrett - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):185–189.
    Hume’s philosophical greatness is widely acknowledged, yet the interpretation of his philosophy is the subject of considerable disagreement and confusion. Cognition and Commitment in Hume’s Philosophy is intended to support critical discussion and evaluation of Hume’s philosophy by offering more accurate interpretations of his treatments of a number of central philosophical topics. The book has three main strategic goals: to isolate and explain Hume’s most fundamental philosophical aims, methods, and principles; to set out and elucidate the content and structure of (...)
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  17. Replies. [REVIEW]Don Garrett - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):205–215.
    David Owen begins his contribution by setting out very clearly how my interpretation of Hume’s distinction between simple and complex perceptions helps to resolve some puzzles about apparent counterexamples to the two most fundamental principles of Hume’s cognitive psychology: the Copy Principle and the Separability Principle. His primary object of criticism is my interpretation of Hume’s famous conclusion that inductive inferences are “not determin’d by reason”. I am as grateful for Owen’s criticisms concerning my treatment of induction as I am (...)
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  18. Replies to Reviews of'Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy'.Don Garrett - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):205-215.
    David Owen begins his contribution by setting out very clearly how my interpretation of Hume’s distinction between simple and complex perceptions helps to resolve some puzzles about apparent counterexamples to the two most fundamental principles of Hume’s cognitive psychology: the Copy Principle and the Separability Principle. His primary object of criticism is my interpretation of Hume’s famous conclusion that inductive inferences are “not determin’d by reason”. I am as grateful for Owen’s criticisms concerning my treatment of induction as I am (...)
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  19. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Hume on Morality.James Baillie - 2000 - Routledge.
    David Hume is widely recognised as the greatest philosopher to have written in the English language. His Treatise on Human Nature is one of the most important works of moral philosophy ever written. Hume on Morality introduces and assesses * Hume's life and the background of the Treatise * The ideas and text in the Treatise * Hume's continuing importance to philosophy.
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  20. Sieges, Shipwrecks, and Sensible Knaves: Justice and Utility in Butler and Hume.John R. Bowlin - 2000 - Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2):253 - 280.
    By examining the theories of justice developed by Joseph Butler and David Hume, the author discloses the conceptual limits of their moral naturalism. Butler was unable to accommodate the possibility that justice is, at least to some extent, a social convention. Hume, who more presciently tried to spell out the conventional character of justice, was unable to carry through that project within the framework of his moral naturalism. These limits have gone unnoticed, largely because Butler and Hume have been misinterpreted, (...)
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  21. An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals.Tom L. Beauchamp (ed.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    This new edition of Hume's Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, published in the Oxford Philosophical Texts series, has been designed especially for the student reader. The text is preceded by a substantial introduction explaining the historical and intellectual background to the work and its relationship to the rest of Hume's philosophy. The volume also includes detailed explanatory notes on the text, a glossary of terms, and a section of supplementary readings.
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  22. Cognition and Commitment in Hume’s Philosophy.Don Garrett - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    It is widely believed that Hume often wrote carelessly and contradicted himself, and that no unified, sound philosophy emerges from his writings. Don Garrett demonstrates that such criticisms of Hume are without basis. Offering fresh and trenchant solutions to longstanding problems in Hume studies, Garrett's penetrating analysis also makes clear the continuing relevance of Hume's philosophy.
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  23. Hume and Nietzsche: Naturalists, Ethicists, Anti-Christians.Craig Beam - 1996 - Hume Studies 22 (2):299-324.
  24. Solitudine E Conversazione I Moralisti Classici E David Hume / Nadia Boccara.Nadia Boccara - 1994 - Universita Degli Studi Della Tuscia, Instituto de Scienze Umane E Delle Arti, Facoltà di Lingue E Letterature Straniere Moderne.
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  25. The Cambridge Companion to Hume.David Fate Norton (ed.) - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume is, arguably, the most important philosopher ever to have written in English. Although best known for his contributions to epistemology, metaphysics, and the philosophy of religion, Hume also made substantial and influential contributions to psychology and the philosophy of mind, ethics, the philosophy of science, political and economic theory, political and social history, and, to a lesser extent, aesthetic and literary theory. All facets of Hume's output are discussed in this volume, the first genuinely comprehensive overview of his (...)
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  26. A Progress of Sentiments: Reflections on Hume's Treatise.Annette Baier - 1991 - Harvard University Press.
  27. Hume, The Women's Moral Theorist.A. Baier - 1987 - In Kittay & Meyers (eds.), Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.
  28. Berry, C.J., Hume, Hegel and Human Nature. [REVIEW]Patricia De Martelaere - 1986 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 48:129.
  29. Hume's Philosophy of Common Life by Donald W. Livingston. [REVIEW]John Deigh - 1985 - Ethics 95 (4):959-.
  30. Jones . - Hume's Sentiments. [REVIEW]D. Deleule - 1984 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 174:478.
  31. STROUD, B. "Hume". [REVIEW]A. Flew - 1979 - Mind 88:286.
  32. The Moral and Political Philosophy of David Hume.Christopher Cherry - 1964 - Philosophical Books 5 (3):25-27.
  33. The English Debate on Suicide From Donne to Hume. [REVIEW]C. A. - 1962 - Review of Metaphysics 16 (2):399-399.
    Sprott reviews the writings on suicide which appeared in England during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He is interested in efforts, most notably those of Donne and Hume, to argue, in the face of religious and other opposition, that suicide can be committed without involving moral offense. He is also interested in the actual cases of suicide during the period and endeavors to correlate the literature with fluctuations in the suicide rate and with legal attitudes toward suicides and their families.--A. (...)
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