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  1. Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy. By P. J. E. Kail. [REVIEW]Donald C. Ainslie - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (2):292-296.
    Peter Kail’s comprehensive, thoughtful, and challenging book focuses on Hume’s use of projectionFthe appeal to mental phenomena to explain manifest features of the worldFin his treatments of external objects, causation, and morality. Almost all interpreters of Hume acknowledge a role for projection, but Kail is the first to unpack the metaphor, and to show the different ways in which projection works in different domains.
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  2. Hume's "Life" and the Virtues of the Dying.Donald C. Ainslie - 2006 - In Thomas Mathien & D. G. Wright (eds.), Autobiography as Philosophy: The Philosophical Uses of Self-Presentation. Routledge.
  3. Review: Hume, a Scottish Socrates? [REVIEW]Donald C. Ainslie - 2003 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):133 - 154.
  4. Scepticism About Persons in Book II of Hume's Treatise.Donald C. Ainslie - 1999 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (3):469-492.
  5. The Problem of the National Self in Hume's Theory of Justice.Donald C. Ainslie - 1995 - Hume Studies 21 (2):289-313.
  6. De la “razón inerte” a la “razón meritoria”.Celia Amorós - 2010 - Logos 43:99-125.
    The reading of the Enlightenment we present here seeks to identify, among the different conceptualisations of reason displayed by enlightened thinking, the one offering the greatest emancipatory virtualities for feminism. The starting point is an analysis of Hume’s concept of personal identity that exposes its patriarchal bias. Against Hume’s notion of an inert reason we set the train of thought that led Poullain de la Barre to conceive reason as permanent work, or effort. The contribution of this feminist philosopher, an (...)
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  7. Specter's of the Humean Self.Christopher Arroyo - 2003 - Philosophy Today 47 (5):79-88.
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  8. Hume's Theory of the Self and its Identity.Lawrence Ashley & Michael Stack - 1974 - Dialogue 13 (2):239-254.
    In our paper we attempt an examination of Hume's positive contributions to the problem of personal identity. In contrast to Penelhum, smith and others, we argue that Hume can and does make sense of the identity of persons through time, but that this identity is not perfect in nature. We argue that Hume presents a logical construction theory of the self. We explain how such a view accounts for our identity and individuality and why it conforms to the empiricist approach.
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  9. U. Thiel, The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume. [REVIEW]Christian Barth - 2013 - Philosophy in Review 33 (1):85-88.
  10. Despair, Liberation and Everyday Life: Two Bundle Views of Personal Identity.Kathy Behrendt - 2003 - Richmond Journal of Philosophy 1 (5):32-37.
    Philosophy sometimes has the reputation of dealing with matters outside the realm of ‘everyday life’, and trading in ideas that float free from anything beyond the armchair in which we sit contemplating them. In this paper, I discuss a standard armchair-branch of philosophy – personal identity theory – and the real-life effects it either has had or has apparently failed to have upon two philosophers: David Hume and Derek Parfit. Both arrive at similar and quite radical beliefs about personal identity. (...)
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  11. Hume on Self-Identity and Memory.J. I. Biro - 1976 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (1):19 - 38.
  12. Hume and Reid on Personal Identity.Paul Chester Boling - 1989 - Dissertation, The University of Tennessee
    Problems of personal identity have intrigued psychologists and philosophers for many years. Certain philosophers, for example, Samuel Clarke, propounded a substance view of the self, i.e., the self is some kind of immaterial substance which underlies all of a person's actions and thoughts, and one is immediately aware of this self. Thomas Reid is an example of this view, as we will see in the following. ;Other philosophers, on the other hand, take a nonsubstantial view of the self. One of (...)
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  13. Hume on Self-Identity, Memory and Causality.J. Bricke - 1977 - In Morice (ed.), David Hume.
  14. Review: Hume's Philosophy of the Self. [REVIEW]John Bricke - 2004 - Mind 113 (450):384-387.
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  15. Humes Philosophy of the Self. [REVIEW]John Bricke - 2004 - Mind 113 (450):384-387.
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  16. Penelhum, Terence. Themes in Hume: The Self, the Will, Religion. [REVIEW]John Bricke - 2002 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (4):871-873.
  17. Hume, Belief, and Personal Identity.Justin Broackes - 2002 - In Peter Millican (ed.), Reading Hume on Human Understanding: Essays on the First Enquiry. Clarendon Press.
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  18. Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy. [REVIEW]Stephen Buckle - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (1):163-165.
  19. The Self and Perceptions; a Study in Humean Philosophy.Panayot Butchvarov - 1959 - Philosophical Quarterly 9 (35):97-115.
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  20. Unidentified Awareness: Hume's Perceptions of the Self.Christian K. Campolo - unknown
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  21. The Historical and Philosophical Significance of Hume's Theory of the Self.N. Capaldi - 1985 - In A. J. Holland (ed.), Philosophy, Its History and Historiography. Dordrecht.
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  22. There Is Just One Idea of Self in Hume's Treatise.Åsa Carlson - 2009 - Hume Studies 35 (1-2):171-184.
    Hume’s mysterious words, “we must distinguish betwixt personal identity, as it regards our thought or imagination, and as it regards our passions or the concern we take in ourselves” have been the focus of a variety of different interpretations, some more creative than others. But the solution to this interpretative problem is indeed very simple, too simple to occur to most readers. What Hume has in mind is actually nothing but the different ways association works with regard to, on the (...)
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  23. Chisholm and Hume on Observing the Self.Robert J. Clack - 1973 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 33 (March):338-348.
  24. Minds, Composition, and Hume's Skepticism in the Appendix.Jonathan Cottrell - 2015 - Philosophical Review 124 (4):533-569.
    This essay gives a new interpretation of Hume's second thoughts about minds in the Appendix, based on a new interpretation of his view of composition. In Book 1 of the Treatise, Hume argued that, as far as we can conceive it, a mind is a whole composed by all its perceptions. But—this essay argues—he also held that several perceptions form a whole only if the mind to which they belong supplies a “connexion” among them. In order to do so, it (...)
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  25. The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume, by Udo Thiel. [REVIEW]Angela Coventry - 2012 - Mind 121 (484):1132-1135.
    In The Early Modern Subject, Udo Thiel explores early modern writings spanning approximately the seventeenth century to the first half of the eighteenth century on two topics of self consciousness, the human subject’s ‘awareness or consciousness of one’s own self’, and personal identity, the human subject’s tendency to regard one’s own self as the same identical self or person that persists through time (p. 1). The aim of the book is twofold. First, to provide an account of the development of (...)
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  26. Review: P. J. E. Kail, Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy[REVIEW]Angela Coventry - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (7).
  27. Nietzsche and Hume on Self and Identity.Nicholas Davey - 1987 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 18:14-29.
  28. Hume on Perceptions and Persons.William Davie - 1984 - Hume Studies 10 (2):125-138.
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  29. Ambiguity of Time, Self, and Philosophical Explanation in Merleau-Ponty, Husserl, and Hume.Laura Duhan - 1987 - Auslegung 13.
    Merleau-ponty's thesis of the ambiguity of time is used to criticize husserl's and hume's views of the self. the thesis states that 1) the experience of present and past time depend on one another for intelligibility, and 2) the "objective" is past experience frozen in time; the "subjective" is present experience. adequate accounts of the self (and, generally, adequate philosophical explanation) will respect the ambiguity of time and discuss the interaction between subjective and objective facets of experience.
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  30. Hume, James and Husserl on the Self.L. A. Dunlap - 1968 - Télos 1968 (2):93-112.
  31. David Hume's Denial of Personal Identity: The Making of a Skeptic.J. A. Dussinger - 1980 - Image 37.
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  32. Hume and Locke on Personal Identity.Antony Eagle - unknown
    • But this is not all: since organisms differ from aggregates (maybe tables do too?). The difference: organisation, indeed, organisation that constitutes ‘vegetable life’.
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  33. The Contents of Hume's Appendix and the Source of His Despair.Jonathan Ellis - 2006 - Hume Studies 32 (2):195-231.
    This paper has two goals: first, to show that the footnote and structure of App. 20, to which too little careful attention has been given, ultimately undermine a great many interpretations of Hume’s dissatisfaction with his theory of personal identity; and second, to offer an interpretation that both heeds these textual features and (unlike other interpretations consistent with these features) renders Hume worried about something that would have truly bothered him. Hume’s problem, I contend, concerns the relation, in his genetic (...)
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  34. Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise. [REVIEW]Lorne Falkenstein - 1999 - Hume Studies 25 (1/2):241-249.
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  35. Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature (I, Iv, 6): Personal Identity.Fred Feldman - unknown
    We are every moment intimately conscious of what we call our self; we feel its existence and its continuing to exist, and are certain - more even than any demonstration could make us - both of its perfect identity and of its simplicity. The strongest sensations and most violent emotions, instead of distracting us from this view ·of our self·, only focus it all the more intensely, making us think about how these sensations and emotions affect our self by bringing (...)
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  36. Hume's Philosophy of the Self.Daniel E. Flage - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (2):276-278.
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  37. Hume on the Cartesian Theory of Substance.Daniel E. Flage & Ronald J. Glass - 1984 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 22 (4):497-508.
    While most of hume's criticisms of the doctrine of substance are epistemological and theory-Independent, We show that in "treatise" i.Iv.5, Hume develops a metaphysical criticism of the cartesian theory of substance. Using three of pierre bayle's arguments of his own ends, He argues that on an empiricist theory of meaning, The cartesian theory of substance is reduced to absurdity.
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  38. Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise.Marina Frasca-Spada - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    Hume's discussion of the idea of space in his Treatise on Human Nature is fundamental to an understanding of his treatment of such central issues as the existence of external objects, the unity of the self, the relation between certainty and belief, and abstract ideas. Marina Frasca-Spada's rich and original study examines this difficult part of Hume's philosophical writings and connects it to eighteenth-century works in natural philosophy, mathematics and literature. Focusing on Hume's discussions of the infinite divisibility of extension, (...)
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  39. The Theater of Personal Identity: From Hume to Derrida.Shaun GalIagher - 1992 - The Personalist Forum 8 (Supplement):21-30.
  40. Is the Self in Hume Overmoralized?Michael D. Garral - 2007 - Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 32 (1):165-183.
    Despite being averse to moral extravagance, Hume’s own conception of morality threatens to be too demanding and his view of human life to be too moralistic. The problem lies in the scope (and concomitantly the content) Hume assigns morality, the effect of which is the apparent exclusion of the morally indifferent and the morally supererogatory. This threatens to render the normative dimension of Hume’s account problematic. Sufficiently problematic to overmoralize the self? That is the question this essay seeks to motivate.
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  41. Once More Into the Labyrinth: Kail's Realist Explanation of Hume's Second Thoughts About Personal Identity.Don Garrett - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):77-87.
    P. J. E. Kail's Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy is an excellent book, consisting—like Hume's Treatise itself—of three excellent parts. I will comment on one central aspect of its second part: its explanation of the source of the second thoughts that Hume famously expressed, with a frustrating lack of specificity, about his own initial discussion of personal identity in the Treatise.As is well known, Hume holds in the section "Of personal identity" (T 1.4.6) that a self, mind, or person (...)
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  42. Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise by Marina Frasca-Spada. [REVIEW]Don Garrett - 2001 - Mind 110 (438):460-464.
  43. Hume's Self-Doubts About Personal Identity.Don Garrett - 1981 - Philosophical Review 90 (3):337-358.
    In this appendix to "a treatise of human nature", Hume expresses dissatisfaction with his own account of personal identity, Claiming that it is "inconsistent." in spite of much recent discussion of the appendix, There has been little agreement either about the reasons for hume's second thoughts or about the philosophical moral to be drawn from them. The present article argues, First, That none of the explanations for his misgivings which have been offered has succeeded in describing a problem which would (...)
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  44. A Humean Argument for Personal Identity.Amihud Gilead - 2008 - Metaphysica 9 (1):1-16.
    Considering various arguments in Hume’s Treatise, I reconstruct a Humean argument against personal identity or unity. According to this argument, each distinct perception is separable from the bundle of perceptions to which it belongs and is thus transferable either to the external, material reality or to another psychical reality, another bundle of perceptions. Nevertheless, such transference (Hume’s word!) is entirely illegitimate, otherwise Hume’s argument against causal inference would have failed; furthermore, it violates private, psychical accessibility. I suggest a Humean thought (...)
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  45. The No-Self Theory: Hume, Buddhism, and Personal Identity.James Giles - 1993 - Philosophy East and West 43 (2):175-200.
    The problem of personal identity is often said to be one of accounting for what it is that gives persons their identity over time. However, once the problem has been construed in these terms, it is plain that too much has already been assumed. For what has been assumed is just that persons do have an identity. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive view of personal identity, and (...)
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  46. Contemporary Treatment of the Problem of Self: The Humean Tradition.Sauravpran Goswami - 1997 - In Dilip Kumar Chakraborty (ed.), Perspectives in Contemporary Philosophy. Ajanta Publications. pp. 197.
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  47. The Self as Narrative in Hume.Lorenzo Greco - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (4):699-722.
    In this paper, I return to the well-known apparent inconsistencies in Hume’s treatment of personal identity in the three books of A Treatise of Human Nature, and try to defend a Humean narrative interpretation of the self. I argue that in Book 1 of the Treatise Hume is answering (to use Marya Schechtman’s expressions in The Constitution of Selves) a “reidentification” question concerning personal identity, which is different from the “characterization” question of Books 2 and 3. That is, I maintain (...)
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  48. Galen Strawson, The Evident Connexion (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011). [REVIEW]Lorenzo Greco - 2012 - Rivista di Filosofia 103 (2):360-62.
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  49. The Idea of a Momentary Self and Hume's Theory of Personal Identity.Michael J. Green - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (1):103 – 122.
  50. The Conception of the Self in Hume and Buddhism.Bina Gupta - 1975 - Dissertation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
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