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  1. The Great Economist David Hume.Robert Sugden - 2021 - Journal of Economic Methodology 28 (3):336-339.
    2 February 2021David Hume is generally acknowledged as one of the greatest philosophers of all time – the author of ground-breaking contributions to moral philosophy, political philosophy, philosop...
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  2. “Shining Bits of Metal”: Money, Property, and the Imagination in Hume’s Political Economy.Timothy M. Costelloe - 2020 - Social Philosophy and Policy 37 (1):213-232.
    This essay examines Hume’s treatment of money in light of his view of the imagination. It begins with his claim that money is distinct from wealth, the latter arising, according to vulgar reasoning, from the power of acquisition that it represents, or, understood philosophically, from the labor that produces it. The salient features that Hume identifies with the imagination are then put forth, namely its power to combine ideas creatively and the principle of easy transition that characterizes its movement among (...)
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  3. História E Economia Em Hume E Kant.Eveline Campos Hauck & Lutti Mira - 2020 - Revista de Filosofia Aurora 32 (56).
  4. David Hume as a Proto-Weberian: Commerce, Protestantism, and Secular Culture.Margaret Schabas - 2020 - Social Philosophy and Policy 37 (1):190-212.
    David Hume wrote prolifically and influentially on economics and was an enthusiast for the modern commercial era of manufacturing and global trade. As a vocal critic of the Church, and possibly a nonbeliever, Hume positioned commerce at the vanguard of secularism. I here argue that Hume broached ideas that gesture toward those offered by Max Weber in his famous Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. Hume discerned a strong correlation between economic flourishing and Protestantism, and he pointed to a (...)
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  5. A Philosopher's Economist: Hume and the Rise of Capitalism.Margaret Schabas & Carl Wennerlind - 2020 - University of Chicago Press.
    Although David Hume’s contributions to philosophy are firmly established, his economics has been largely overlooked. A Philosopher’s Economist offers the definitive account of Hume’s “worldly philosophy” and argues that economics was a central preoccupation of his life and work. Margaret Schabas and Carl Wennerlind show that Hume made important contributions to the science of economics, notably on money, trade, and public finance. Hume’s astute understanding of human behavior provided an important foundation for his economics and proved essential to his analysis (...)
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  6. El concepto de causalidad en la obra filosófica y en la obra económica de David Hume.Ariadna Cazenave - 2019 - Mutatis Mutandis: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 13.
    La obra filosófica de David Hume es celebrada como una de las más importantes de un autor de habla inglesa. Tal reconocimiento se debe en gran medida a su crı́tica al concepto de causalidad, que despertó a Kant de su “sueño dogmático”.En otro plano, también es reconocida la crı́tica de Hume al sistema comercial defendido por los mercantilistas. Por lo general, las dos crı́ticas han sido estudiadas de manera aislada por distintas disciplinas historiográficas. El presente trabajo se propone abordar conjuntamente (...)
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  7. Reason and Political Economy in Hume.Erik W. Matson - 2019 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 12 (1):26-51.
    This paper examines some connections between Hume’s epistemology in his Treatise of Human Nature and his political economy. I make three claims: First, I argue that it is the development of Hume’s account of the faculty of reason in Book I of the Treatise that leads him to emphasize social science—including political economy—and the humanities over more abstract modes of intellectual inquiry. Second, I argue that Hume’s conception of reason has implications for his methodology in political economy. His perception of (...)
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  8. The Vigorous and Doux Soldier: David Hume’s Military Defence of Commerce.Maria Pia Paganelli & Reinhard Schumacher - 2018 - History of European Ideas 44 (8):1141-1152.
    ABSTRACTIf war is an inevitable condition of human nature, as David Hume suggests, then what type of societies can best protect us from defeat and conquest? For David Hume, commerce decreases the relative cost of war and promotes technological military advances as well as martial spirit. Commerce therefore makes a country militarily stronger and better equipped to protect itself against attacks than any other kind of society. Hume does not assume commerce would yield a peaceful world nor that commercial societies (...)
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  9. David Hume: czy ekonomia może być nauką?Paweł Hanczewski - 2017 - Studia Z Historii Filozofii 7 (4):203-220.
    The title of this article refers to one of the best-known essays written by David Hume, That Politics may be reduced to a Science. Hume assumed that politics was a science because it admitted of some general truths, which could not be varied by human beings. He adopted a similar stance, albeit indirectly, in the case of economics, discovering several general truths concerning the origins of wealth, money and international trade. At times, however, he was far from being consistent and (...)
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  10. David Hume: Unwitting Cosmopolitan?Edward W. Glowienka - 2015 - Diametros 44:153-172.
    If Hume is considered cosmopolitan in his ethics at all, he is said to be so through his anti-mercantilist approach to commerce. Prevailing commercial interpretations attribute to Hume a cosmopolitanism that is best described as instrumental and supervenient. I argue that Hume’s principles lead to a cosmopolitan ethic that is more demanding than commercial interpretations recognize. Hume’s cosmopolitanism is more than merely supervenient and its instrumentality is such that cosmopolitan regard becomes inseparable from healthy patriotic concern. I show sympathy and (...)
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  11. "Politics May Be Reduced To a Science"?: Between Politics and Economics in Hume's Concepts of Convention.Ryu Susato - 2015 - Hume Studies 41 (1):81-89.
    Many Hume scholars have partially anticipated the essential links between his magnum opus—the History of England—and other writings, but we lacked an appropriate theoretical framework. According to Andrew Sabl,2 the key to the breakthrough is provided by “coordination theory.” The approach to Hume’s work through the lens of twentieth-century political theories has been preceded, to take one example, by Russell Hardin, who envisions Hume’s notion of convention as a prototype of game theory. Hardin also mentions coordination theory in relation to (...)
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  12. Missing Links: Hume, Smith, Kant and Economic Methodology.Stuart Holland & Teresa Carla Oliveira - 2013 - Economic Thought 2 (2):46.
    This paper traces missing links in the history of economic thought. In outlining Hume's concept of 'the reflexive mind' it shows that this opened frontiers between philosophy and psychology which Bertrand Russell denied and which logical positivism in philosophy and positive economics displaced. It relates this to Hume's influence not only on Smith, but also on Schopenhauer and the later Wittgenstein, with parallels in Gestalt psychology and recent findings from neural research and cognitive psychology. It critiques Kant's reaction to Hume's (...)
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  13. Politische Und Ökonomische Essays: Teilband 2.David Hume - 2013 - Felix Meiner Verlag.
    Diese Essays können als literarische Neu- und Umformulierung der philosophischen Absichten des Traktats gelten und lassen sich auch als Reaktionen Humes auf aktuelle Probleme lesen. In ihnen dokumentiert sich ein Politikverständnis, das aus der Tradition einer umfassenden philosophia practica lebt und eingebettet ist in eine weite, gesellschaftstheoretische Perspektive. Die Ausgabe bietet die erste umfassende Neuausgabe der Essays in deutscher Sprache seit 1800.
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  14. Ethics, Economy and Labor: The Enlightenment Paradigm in David Hume and Adam Smith.Eugenio Lecaldano - 2013 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 26 (1):133-152.
  15. Hume’s “Wilt Chamberlain Argument” and Taxation.Kenneth Henley - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):148-160.
    Robert Nozick addresses the idea of egalitarian redistribution in an argument standardly considered original: the “Wilt Chamberlain Argument”. However, this argument is found in David Hume's An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals, first published in 1751. Placing this argument within a Humean and Hayekian, rather than a Lockean or Kantian, perspective radically changes its import for issues of economic justice. Rather than vindicating the radical individualism of Nozick and other libertarians, applied to our circumstances using Hume's conventionalist and evolutionary (...)
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  16. Review of Willie Henderson's The Origins of David Hume's Economics. London and New York: Routledge, 2010, 228 Pp. [REVIEW]Christopher Berry - 2011 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 4 (1):108.
  17. Carl Wennerlind and Margaret Schabas, Eds. David Hume’s Political Economy.John Robertson - 2011 - Hume Studies 37 (1):123-127.
  18. Carl Wennerlind and Margaret Schabas, Eds. David Hume’s Political Economy.John Robertson - 2011 - Hume Studies 37 (1):123-127.
    This collection of papers is as welcome as it is overdue. As its editors observe in their introduction, the reference point for studies of Hume’s economic thinking has remained Eugene Rotwein’s “Introduction” to his volume David Hume: Writings on Economics (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press) since its publication in 1955. The conference from which these papers derive was convened forty-eight years later, in 2003, and the volume was another five years in preparation (while this review, in turn, has taken its (...)
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  19. Hume’s “Early Memoranda” and the Making of His Political Economy.Tatsuya Sakamoto - 2011 - Hume Studies 37 (2):131-164.
    This essay argues that while the so-called “Hume’s Early Memoranda” has long been regarded as Hume’s juvenile work composed before A Treatise of Human Nature, there is significant internal and external evidence to the contrary. M. A. Stewart’s recent thesis made a new attempt to move the period of composition to the early 1740s. I seek in the following essay to date the composition even later, in the latter half of the 1740s. Re-examined in this new light, the memoranda credibly (...)
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  20. The Role of Political Economy in Hume’s Moral Philosophy.Carl Wennerlind - 2011 - Hume Studies 37 (1):43-64.
    Hume insisted that property serve as the foundation of society because it best promotes the greatest amount of industry and therefore contributes to public utility. Industry thus plays a central role in Hume’s theory of justice. Given that Hume extensively discussed the social, political, cultural, and moral implications of industry in the Political Discourses, I suggest that Hume’s economic writings should be understood as an integral part of his overall philosophical project. In offering a parallel reading of the Enquiry Concerning (...)
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  21. Locke, Berkeley, and Hume as Philosophers of Money.George C. Caffentzis - 2010 - In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
    For the last 30 years I have been writing a trilogy on Locke’s, Berkeley’s, and Hume’s philosophies of money. With the publication of Clipped Coins. Abused Words and Civil Government; John Locke’s Philosophy of Money and Exciting the Industry of Mankind; George Berkeley’s Philosophy of Money and with the last volume on Hume in preparation, the trilogy is now almost completed.
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  22. Review: David Hume's Political Economy. [REVIEW]Mark Yellin - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (2):216-221.
  23. David Hume on Monetary Policy: A Retrospective Approach.Maria Pia Paganelli - 2009 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (1):65-85.
    Monetary policy is a modern idea of which David Hume is generally considered a precursor. Moreover, thanks to Milton Friedman and Robert Lucas, he is often presented as one of the first and most illustrious endorser of monetarism. This paper argues against this view, and in agreement with Joseph Schumpeter, that Hume's contribution to economics, while not insignificant, cannot claim any real novelties. It offers an interpretation of Hume as a descendant of a pre-modern understanding of money rather than a (...)
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  24. Hume's Principles of Political Economy.Andrew S. Skinner - 2009 - In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Anne Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge University Press.
  25. Hume’s Monetary Thought Experiments.Margaret Schabas - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (2):161-169.
    Contemporary economists deem virtually every piece of reasoning and argumentation in economics a model, forgetting that there may well be other conceptual tools at hand. This article demonstrates that David Hume used thought experiments to make some remarkable breakthroughs in monetary economics, and that this resolves a longstanding debate about an apparent inconsistency in Hume, between the neutrality and non-neutrality of money. In the actual world, money is never neutral for Hume; only in thought experiments does a sudden growth in (...)
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  26. David Hume : Principles of Political Economy.Andrew S. Skinner - 2008 - In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge University Press.
  27. Psychologia ekonomiczna Davida Hume'a.Katarzyna Kopczyńska & Stefan Zabieglik - 2007 - Nowa Krytyka 20.
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  28. Groups Versus Individuals in Hume’s Political Economy.Margaret Schabas - 2007 - The Monist 90 (2):200-212.
  29. Covenants and Reputations.Peter Vanderschraaf - 2007 - Synthese 157 (2):167 - 195.
    In their classic analyses, Hobbes and Hume argue that offensively violating a covenant is irrational because the offense ruins one’s reputation. This paper explores conditions under which reputation alone can enforce covenants. The members of a community are modeled as interacting in a Covenant Game repeated over time. Folk theorems are presented that give conditions under which the Humean strategy of performing in covenants only with those who have never offensively violated or performed with an offensive violator characterizes an equilibrium (...)
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  30. Eseje ekonomiczne Davida Hume'a.Stefan Zabieglik - 2007 - Nowa Krytyka 20.
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  31. Endogenous Money and David Hume.Maria Pia Paganelli - 2006 - Eastern Economic Journal.
    David Hume's monetary theory has two standard yet inconsistent readings. As a forefather of the quantity theory of money, Hume sees money as neutral. As an inflationist, Hume sees an active positive role for monetary policy. This paper reads Hume consistently instead, by showing that for Hume money is endogenous and demand driven. Hume would read the money equation as reverse causation and the co-presence of inflation and output growth as driven by demand. The 18th century knowledge of monetary theory (...)
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  32. David Hume, Ekonomske Rasprave.Ervin Plehandžić - 2006 - Prolegomena 5 (1):132-135.
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  33. Hume's Non-Instrumental and Non-Propositional Decision Theory.Robert Sugden - 2006 - Economics and Philosophy 22 (3):365-391.
    Hume is often read as proposing an instrumental theory of decision, in which an agent's choices are rational if they maximally satisfy her desires, given her beliefs. In fact, Hume denies that rationality can be attributed to actions. I argue that this is not a gap needing to be filled. Hume's theory provides a coherent and self-contained understanding of action, compatible with current developments in experimental psychology and behavioural economics. On Hume's account, desires are primitive psychological motivations which do not (...)
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  34. The Circumstances of Justice.Peter Vanderschraaf - 2006 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (3):321-351.
    In this article, I analyze the circumstances of justice, that is, the background conditions that are necessary and sufficient for justice to exist between individual parties in society. Contemporary political philosophers almost unanimously accept an account of these circumstances attributed to David Hume. I argue that the conditions of this standard account are neither sufficient nor necessary conditions for justice. In particular, I contend that both a Hobbesian state of nature and a prisoner’s dilemma are cases in which the conditions (...)
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  35. Historia i ekonomia u Hume\'a i Kanta.Norbert Waszek - 2004 - Filo-Sofija 4 (1(4)):17-26.
  36. Toward a Transactional Theory of Decision Making: Creative Rationality as Functional Coordination in Context.Shabnam Mousavi & Jim Garrison - 2003 - Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (2):131-156.
    This paper poses a Deweyan challenge to both the neoclassical framework of rational choice and models of bounded rationality and deliberation, especially the procedural theory of rationality advanced by Herbert Simon. We demonstrate how modern theories on procedural or instrumental rationality trace their origin to the tradition of British empiricism, especially the philosophy of David Hume. Most theories of action such as Simon's assume actors may control their bodies 'at will.' For Dewey, habits are will; we control them when we (...)
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  37. The Rise of Political Economy in the Scottish Enlightenment.Tatsuya Sakamoto & Hideo Tanaka - 2003 - Routledge.
    This collection of essays provides a comprehensive view of the economic thought of the Scottish Enlightenment. Organized as a chronological account of the rise and progress of political economy in eighteenth century Scotland, each chapter discusses the way in which the moral and economic improvement of the Scottish nation became a common concern. Contributors not only explore the economic discourses of David Hume, James Steuart and Adam Smith but also consider the neglected economic writings of Andrew Fletcher, Robert Wallace, Francis (...)
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  38. Classics of Political and Moral Philosophy.Steven M. Cahn (ed.) - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    Classics of Political and Moral Philosophy provides in one volume the major writings from nearly 2,500 years of political and moral philosophy. The most comprehensive collection of its kind, it moves from classical thought (Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Cicero) through medieval views (Augustine, Aquinas) to modern perspectives (Machiavelli, Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Rousseau, Hume, Adam Smith, Kant). It includes major nineteenth-century thinkers (Hegel, Bentham, Mill, Nietzsche) as well as twentieth-century theorists (Rawls, Nozick, Nagel, Foucault, Habermas, Nussbaum). Also included are numerous essays from (...)
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  39. Hume, Money, and Civilization; or, Why Was Hume a Metallist?C. George Caffentzis - 2001 - Hume Studies 27 (2):301-335.
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  40. David Hume and the Political Economy of Agrarian Civilization.Alan Macfarlane - 2001 - History of European Ideas 27 (1):79-91.
    Montesquieu and Adam Smith undertook deep analyses of the structural laws of agrarian civilizations and described the traps and tendencies which would prevent any final escape from constant toil and inequality. David Hume's work in certain of his ‘Essays’ complements their work. He shows the social, political, religious and economic conditions which had made England the most free and wealthy nation in the world by his time. Simultaneously he shows the strong forces which would ultimately lead to stasis even in (...)
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  41. Moral Canals: Trust and Social Capital in the Work of Hume, Smith and Genovesi.Luigino Bruni & Robert Sugden - 2000 - Economics and Philosophy 16 (1):21-45.
    It is a truism that a market economy cannot function without trust. We must be able to rely on other people to respect our property rights, and on our trading partners to keep their promises. The theory of economics is incomplete unless it can explain why economic agents often trust one another, and why that trust is often repaid. There is a long history of work in economics and philosophy which tries to explain the kinds of reasoning that people use (...)
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  42. Hume on Economic Policy and Human Nature.Edward Soule - 2000 - Hume Studies 26 (1):143-157.
    This article explains and criticizes several of Hume's arguments regarding British economic policy. I focus on Hume's methodology, which is essentially utilitarian but also depends heavily on his philosophical account of human psychology. I claim that the arguments examined prevail over competing 18th century approaches to economic policy. And I explain the relevance of this methodology for present day public policy debates.
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  43. Hume’s Game-Theoretic Business Ethics.Peter Vanderschraaf - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (1):47-67.
    In recent years, a number of authors have used gametheoretic reasoning to explain why purely self-interested agentswould ever conform their economic activities with the requirements of justice, when by doing so they forego opportunities to reapunilateral net gains by exploiting others. In this paper, I argue that Hume's justification of honest economic exchanges between self-interested agents in the Treatise foreshadows this contemporary literature. Hume analyzes the problem of explaining justice in self-interested economic exchange as a problem of agents coordinating on (...)
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  44. Economia E Política Em Hume.António Franco Alexandre - 1998 - Philosophica 11:133-152.
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  45. Il pensiero rapsodico di D.Hume: contributo per una comprensione del pensiero politico ed economico di D.Hume.Giorgio Rizzo - 1998 - Idee 37:181-200.
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  46. The Informal Game Theory in Hume's Account of Convention.Peter Vanderschraaf - 1998 - Economics and Philosophy 14 (2):215.
    Hume is rightly credited with giving a brilliant, and perhaps the best, account of justice as convention. Hume's importance as a forerunner of modern economics has also long been recognized. However, most of Hume's readers have not fully appreciated how closely Hume's analysis of convention foreshadows a particular branch of economic theory, namely, game theory. Starting with the work of Barry, Runciman and Sen and Lewis, there has been a flowering of literature on the informal game-theoretic insights to be found (...)
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  47. The Methodology Rather Than the Rhetoric of Economics Mccloskey on Popper and Hume.Hugh V. Mclachlan & J. K. Swales - 1997 - Glasgow Caledonian University.
  48. To Redeem Metal with Paper: David Hume’s Philosophy of Money.Loren Gatch - 1996 - Hume Studies 22 (1):169-191.
    Hume's political economy and his contributions to monetary theory are usually regarded as a minor part of his philosophic output. This paper argues that Hume's monetary ideas can, in fact, be read back into his moral and epistemological concerns so as to give the institution of money a larger significance for Humean social thought. In particular, the possibility of an abstract and entirely fiduciary money, like Hume's notion of sympathy, promises to transcend the entropic logic of representation that otherwise enervates (...)
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  49. Personal Identity and Standard Economic Theory.John B. Davis - 1995 - Journal of Economic Methodology 2 (1):35-52.
    This paper investigates the topic of personal identity in standard neoclassical theory. It looks first at the traditional utility theory of maximizing consumers and then at the extension of that analysis in the time-allocation-household-production model to see how relatively settled ontological commitments in the neoclassical research program undergo modification with its development. David Hume's skeptical treatment of personal identity is employed to assess the traditional view. The time-allocation model is shown to escape some of Hume's problems, but encounters difficulties of (...)
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  50. An Eighteenth Century View of Economic Development Hume and Steuart.Anthony Brewer - 1994 - University of Bristol, Department of Economics.
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