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  1. Hume Variations.A. Fodor Jerry - 2003 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Hume? Yes, David Hume, that's who Jerry Fodor looks to for help in advancing our understanding of the mind. Fodor claims his Treatise of Human Nature as the foundational document of cognitive science: it launched the project of constructing an empirical psychology on the basis of a representational theory of mind. Going back to this work after more than 250 years we find that Hume is remarkably perceptive about the components and structure that a theory of mind requires. Careful study (...)
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  2. Oliver Johnson, The Mind of David Hume: A Companion to Book I of A Treatise of Human Nature Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Christopher Belshaw - 1996 - Philosophy in Review 16 (5):353-354.
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  3. Hume Variations. [REVIEW]John Biro - 2005 - Hume Studies 31 (1):173-176.
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  4. Hume on Self-Identity, Memory and Causality.J. Bricke - 1977 - In Morice (ed.), David Hume.
  5. Mind and Morality: An Examination of Hume's Moral Psychology.John Bricke - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    This book is a penetrating study of the theory of mind and morality that Hume developed in his Treatise of Human Nature and other writings. Hume rejects any conception of moral beliefs and moral truths. He understands morality in terms of distinctive desires and other sentiments that arise through the correction of sympathy. Hume's theory presents a powerful challenge to recent cognitivist theories of moral judgement, Bricke argues, and suggests significant limitations to recent conventionalist and contractarian accounts of morality's content.
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  6. Minds, Composition, and Hume's Skepticism in the Appendix.Jonathan Cottrell - 2015 - Philosophical Review 124 (4):533-569.
    This essay gives a new interpretation of Hume's second thoughts about minds in the Appendix, based on a new interpretation of his view of composition. In Book 1 of the Treatise, Hume argued that, as far as we can conceive it, a mind is a whole composed by all its perceptions. But—this essay argues—he also held that several perceptions form a whole only if the mind to which they belong supplies a “connexion” among them. In order to do so, it (...)
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  7. Passions and Persons in Hume's Philosophy of Mind.Angela Coventry - forthcoming - In Rebecca Copenhaver & Christopher Shields (eds.), History of the Philosophy of Mind, Six Volumes. Routledge.
    This paper examines the ongoing relevance of Hume on the mind and self or personal identity.
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  8. The Mind of David Hume.Francis W. Dauer - 1998 - Hume Studies 24 (2):375-379.
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  9. The Frame Problem: Artificial Intelligence Meets David Hume.James H. Fetzer - 1990 - International Journal of Expert Systems 3:219-232.
  10. David Hume's Theory of Mind.Daniel E. Flage - 1990 - Routledge.
    INTRODUCTION Anyone who reads David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature cannot but be struck by the diversity of philosophical issues Hume addresses, ...
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  11. Hume's Philosophy of Mind.Daniel E. Flage - 1983 - Hume Studies 9 (1):82-88.
  12. Hume's Program (and Ours).Jerry A. Fodor - 2003 - In Hume Variation. Clarendon Press.
  13. Hume and the Enactive Approach to Mind.Tom Froese - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (1):95-133.
    An important part of David Hume’s work is his attempt to put the natural sciences on a firmer foundation by introducing the scientific method into the study of human nature. This investigation resulted in a novel understanding of the mind, which in turn informed Hume’s critical evaluation of the scope and limits of the scientific method as such. However, while these latter reflections continue to influence today’s philosophy of science, his theory of mind is nowadays mainly of interest in terms (...)
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  14. Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise by Marina Frasca-Spada. [REVIEW]Don Garrett - 2001 - Mind 110 (438):460-464.
  15. Review of Jerry Fodor : Hume Variations. [REVIEW]Brian Garvey - unknown
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  16. Editorial Introduction: Hume on Mind and Causality.John Haldane - 2007 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 5 (1):iv-x.
  17. Recent Scholarship on Hume's Theory of Mental Representation.David Landy - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1).
    In a recent paper, Karl Schafer argues that Hume's theory of mental representation has two distinct components, unified by their shared feature of having accuracy conditions. As Schafer sees it, simple and complex ideas represent the intrinsic imagistic features of their objects whereas abstract ideas represent the relations or structures in which multiple objects stand. This distinction, however, is untenable for at least two related reasons. Firstly, complex ideas represent the relations or structures in which the impressions that are the (...)
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  18. Kant’s Inferentialism: The Case Against Hume.David Landy - 2015 - Routledge.
    Kant’s Inferentialism draws on a wide range of sources to present a reading of Kant’s theory of mental representation as a direct response to the challenges issued by Hume in A Treatise of Human Nature. Kant rejects the conclusions that Hume draws on the grounds that these are predicated on Hume’s theory of mental representation, which Kant refutes by presenting objections to Hume’s treatment of representations of complex states of affairs and the nature of judgment. In its place, Kant combines (...)
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  19. David Hume on custom and habit and living with skepticism.John Christian Laursen - 2011 - Daimon: Revista de Filosofia 52:87-99.
    This article is an exploration of David Hume's philosophy of custom and habit as a way of living with skepticism. For Hume, man is a habit-forming animal, and all politics and history take place within a history of custom and habit. This is not a bad thing: life without custom and habit would be a nightmare. Hume draws on the "new science" of thinkers such as Locke, Shaftesbury, Mandeville, Hutcheson, and Butler to foreground the importance of custom and habit. His (...)
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  20. Hume's Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW]C. N. - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 34 (3):599-600.
  21. John Bricke, Mind and Morality: An Examination of Hume's Moral Psychology. [REVIEW]A. E. Pitson - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18 (1):10-12.
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  22. Hume's Treatment of Denial in the Treatise.Lewis Powell - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14 (26).
    David Hume fancied himself the Newton of the mind, aiming to reinvent the study of human mental life in the same way that Newton had revolutionized physics. And it was his view that the novel account of belief he proposed in his Treatise of Human Nature was one of that work’s central philosophical contributions. From the earliest responses to the Treatise forward, however, there was deep pessimism about the prospects for his account. It is easy to understand the source of (...)
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  23. Hume's Dynamism: The Problem of Power.Augustín Riška - 2008 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 15 (1):20-28.
    In this essay, I investigate the dynamic foundations of Hume’s philosophy which is so heavily dependent upon Newton’s physics. Hume’s ubiquitous phrase „force and vivacity” is symptomatic of his dynamic, rather than voluntaristic, position that dominates his interpretation of impressions, ideas, and causality in particular. After pointing out some inconsistencies of Hume’s Newtonism, I concentrate on Hume’s treatment of power. It is a well-known fact that Hume rejected natural powers, in fear of their occult character, but accepted human powers giving (...)
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  24. Hume Variations. [REVIEW]John Sarnecki - 2005 - Dialogue 44 (4):809-811.
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  25. Hume's Missing Shade of Blue.Reginald O. Savage - 1992 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 9 (2):199 - 206.
  26. On Hume's Defense of Berkeley.Alan Schwerin - 2015 - Open Journal of Philosophy 5 (6):327 - 337.
    In 1739 Hume bequeathed a bold view of the self to the philosophical community that would prove highly influential, but equally controversial. His bundle theory of the self elicited substantial opposition soon after its appearance in the Treatise of Human Nature. Yet Hume makes it clear to his readers that his views on the self rest on respectable foundations: namely, the views of the highly regarded Irish philosopher, George Berkeley. As the author of the Treatise sees it, his account of (...)
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  27. Language and Hume's Search for a Theory of the Self.Alan Schwerin - 2015 - Metaphysica: Internationale Fachzeitschrift Für Ontologie Und Metaphysik (Issue 2):139 - 158.
    In his Treatise Hume makes a profound suggestion: philosophical problems, especially problems in metaphysics, are verbal. This view is most vigorously articulated and defended in the course of his investigation of the problem of the self, in the section “Of personal identity.” My paper is a critical exploration of Hume's arguments for this influential thesis and an analysis of the context that informs this 1739 version of the nature of philosophical problems that anticipates the linguistic turn in philosophy. -/- .
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  28. "Is Hume's Account of the Soul Contradictory?".Alan Schwerin - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 2 (4):61 - 68.
    In his Treatise of Human Nature Hume argues for a provocative account of the soul; the soul - or self, as he prefers to call it - is nothing but a bundle of perceptions. But this bold thesis, concedes Hume, gives rise to a predicament concerning two incompatible propositions, or principles as he calls them: one on the nature of perceptions, the other on the capabilities of the mind: "In short, there are two principles, which I cannot render consistent; nor (...)
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  29. Hume, David.Saul Traiger - manuscript
    Impressed by Isaac Newton's success at explaining the apparently diverse and chaotic physical world with a few universal principles, David Hume (1711-1776), while still in his teens, proposed that the same might be done for the realm of the mind. Through observation and experimentation, Hume hoped to uncover the mind's "secret springs and principles." Hume's proposal for a science of the mind was published as..
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  30. David Hume and the Problem of Other Minds.Anik Waldow - 2009 - Continuum.
    Other minds and their place in the Hume-literature -- A modern approach -- Scepticism versus naturalism -- The vulgar and the philosopher -- Relative ideas -- Concepts of the real -- Intuition and common sense -- Epistemic responsibility -- Degeneration of reason -- Just philosophy -- Conceiving minds -- Abstraction -- Argument from analogy -- Sympathy -- Limitations -- Generality -- Hume's concept of mind -- The world and the other -- Habit and intersubjective responsiveness -- Belief and education -- (...)
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  31. Hume's Theory of Mental Activity.Robert Paul Wolff - 1960 - Philosophical Review 69 (3):289-310.
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