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  1. Simpatía, naturaleza e identidad en Hume.Fernando Infante del Rosal - 2013 - Eikasia. Revista de Filosofía 51:177-204.
    En su concepción de la simpatía Hume se desligó de sus coetáneos aportando una visión muy especial de este fenómeno, no como afecto o sentimiento, sino como factor y condición para la comunicabilidad de los afectos. La simpatía, lejos de fundarse en un rasgo moral de la naturaleza humana o en el reconocimiento de la semejanza y la proximidad, aparece como factor generador de la identidad y de los afectos, base para la constitución de lo subjetivo y lo intersubjetivo.
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  2. Fodor’s guide to the Humean mind.Tamás Demeter - forthcoming - Synthese:1-21.
    For Jerry Fodor, Hume’s Treatise of Human Nature is “the foundational document of cognitive science” whose significance transcends mere historical interest: it is a source of theoretical inspiration in cognitive psychology. Here I am going to argue that those reading Hume along Fodor’s lines rely on a problematic, albeit inspiring, construction of Hume’s science of mind. My strategy in this paper is to contrast Fodor’s understanding of the Humean mind with an alternative understanding that I propose. I thereby intend to (...)
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  3. Hume's Impression of Will.Joshua M. Wood - 2017 - Hume Studies 43 (1):91-116.
    The "impression of will" is intended to pick out the experience of willing an act. Hume discusses this impression in the Treatise primarily in terms of its psychological setting, describing it as "the internal impression we feel and are conscious of, when we knowingly give rise to any new motion of our body, or new perception of our mind".1 It is not obvious what Hume means in this and related passages. Scholars have offered a number of suggestions about how the (...)
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  4. An Integrated Approach to the Study of Mind (Rene Descartes, David Hume and Gilbert Ryle).Desh Raj Sirswal - 2020 - Pehowa (Kurukshetra): CPPIS.
    The present book is the revised version of my Ph.D. Thesis “A Philosophical Study of the Concept of Mind (with special reference to Rene Descartes, David Hume and Gilbert Ryle)”. I have selected three thinkers Rene Descartes, David Hume and Gilbert Ryle to discuss their ideas on the nature of mind. All the above thinkers have relevance in cognitive science and philosophy of mind by their conceptions about the mind and problems they have raised. We have used analysis as a (...)
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  5. Triggers of Thought: Impressions Within Hume’s Theory of Mind.Anik Waldow - 2010 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 13 (1):105-121.
    This essay argues that Humean impressions are triggers of associative processes, which enable us to form stable patterns of thought that co-vary with our experiences of the world. It will thus challenge the importance of the Copy Principle by claiming that it is the regularity with which certain kinds of sensory inputs motivate certain sets of complex ideas that matters for the discrimination of ideas. This reading is conducive to Hume’s account of perception, because it avoids the impoverishment of conceptual (...)
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  6. Commentary on Bozzi’s Untimely Meditations on the Relation Between Self and Non-Self.Robert M. Kelly & Barry Smith - 2019 - In Ivana Bianchi & Richard Davies (eds.), Paolo Bozzi’s Experimental Phenomenology. London and New York: Routledge. pp. 125-129.
    Independently of whether an object of experience becomes a candidate for being a part of the self or a part of the external world, it is always given to us as just an object of experience. The observer-observed relation can be seen as a type of relation with many instances, both between the self and different objects of experience and between any given object of experience and different selves. The self is situated in a spatial grid, where the latter can (...)
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  7. Dissertação sobre as paixões.Jaimir Conte - 2011 - Princípios: Revista de Filosofia 18 (29):371-399.
    Tradução para o português da "Dissertation on passions", de David Hume. Tradução realizada com base nas seguintes edições: 1. Four Dissertations/ David Hume, edited by John Immerwahr. (Facsimile da edição de 1757 publicada por A. Millar, Thoemmes Press, 1995); 2. A Dissertation on the passions ; The natural history of religion : a critical edition /David Hume; edited by Tom L. Be auchamp. (The Clarendon Edition of the Works of David Hume. Oxford: Ox ford University Press, 2007); 3. The Complete (...)
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  8. Descartes and Hume on I-Thoughts.Luca Forgione - 2018 - Thémata: Revista de Filosofía 57:211-228.
    Self-consciousness can be understood as the ability to think I-thou-ghts which can be described as thoughts about oneself ‘as oneself’. Self-consciousness possesses two specific correlated features: the first regards the fact that it is grounded on a first-person perspective, whereas the second concerns the fact that it should be considered a consciousness of the self as subject rather than a consciousness of the self as object. The aim of this paper is to analyse a few considerations about Descartes and Hume’s (...)
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  9. Hume’s (Ad Hoc?) Appeal to the Calm Passions.Hsueh Qu - 2018 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 100 (4):444-469.
    Hume argues that whenever we seem to be motivated by reason, there are unnoticed calm passions that play this role instead, a move that is often criticised as ad hoc. In response, some commentators propose a conceptual rather than empirical reading of Hume’s conativist thesis, either as a departure from Hume, or as an interpretation or rational reconstruction. I argue that conceptual accounts face a dilemma: either they render the conativist thesis trivial, or they violate Hume’s thesis that ‘a priori, (...)
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  10. History of the Concept of Mind: Speculations About Soul, Mind and Spirit From Homer to Hume.Amos Yong - 2004 - Philosophia Christi 6 (2):337-340.
  11. Hume's Moral Psychology and Contemporary Psychology, Edited by Philip Reed and Rico Vitz. [REVIEW]Angela Coventry - 2018 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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  12. David Hume E as Paixões Indiretas Na Sociedade Em Rede.Tiago Porto & Agemir Bavaresco - 2013 - Revista Opinião Filosófica 4 (2).
    O presente artigo pretende trazer à discussão a importância da Teoria das Paixões desenvolvida por David Hume como um horizonte interpretativo para as ações dos indivíduos conetados às redes sociais da Internet. Para tanto, este trabalho abordará inicialmente o que conhecemos por sociedade em rede e o importante papel desempenhado pela Internet nessa configuração social; em seguida, analisaremos como as paixões indiretas influenciam os indivíduos conectados à rede internacional de computadores.
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  13. La raison pratique existe-t-elle? Examen critique de Hume, Treatise II.iii.3.Daniel Schulthess - 2004 - In Ali Benmakhlouf & Jean-François Lavigne (eds.), Avenir de la raison, Devenir des rationalités - Actes du XXXIXe Congrès de l'ASPLF, Nice, 27 août-1er septembre 2002. Paris: Vrin. pp. p. 215-220..
    The article proposes an interpretation of the role of practical reason in Hume. The starting point is the distinction between strong practical reason and weak practical reason. The distinction concerns the assignment of values to states of affairs: strong practical reason is itself involved in this assignment of values, whereas weak practical reason only deliberates on the basis of given assignments. According to the author of the article Hume, showing how our choices are produced from a mechanics of passions, refutes (...)
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  14. Ruly and Unruly Passions: Early Modern Perspectives.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:21-38.
    A survey of theories on the passions and action in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Britain and western Europe reveals that few, if any, of the major writers held the view that reason in any of its functions executes action without a passion. Even rationalists, like Cambridge Platonist Ralph Cudworth and English clergyman Samuel Clarke, recognized the necessity of passion to action. On the other hand, many of these intellectuals also agreed with French philosophers Jean-François Senault, René Descartes, and Nicolas Malebranche that, (...)
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  15. Book ReviewsTerence Penelhum,. Themes in Hume: The Self, the Will, Religion.New York: Oxford University Press, 2000. Pp. Xix+294. $55.00. [REVIEW]Ira Singer - 2003 - Ethics 113 (4):905-907.
  16. Verstehen durch Emotionen. Hume zum Problem des Fremdpsychischen (Understanding through Emotions).Anik Waldow - 2014 - In Frank Brosow & Heiner Klemme (eds.), David Hume nach 300 Jahren. Historische Kontexte und systematische Perspektiven. Münster: Mentis. pp. 128-148.
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  17. Feeling, Impulse and Changeability: The Role of Emotion in Hume's Theory of the Passions.A. Paxman Katharina - unknown
    Hume’s “impressions of reflection” is a category made up of all our non-sensory feelings, including “the passions and other emotions.” These two terms for affective mental states, ‘passion’ and ‘emotion’, are both used frequently in Hume’s work, and often treated by scholars as synonymous. I argue that Hume’s use of both ‘passion’ and ‘emotion’ in his discussions of affectivity reflects a conceptual distinction implicit in his work between what I label ‘attending emotions’ and ‘fully established passions.’ The former are the (...)
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  18. Hume – Cyber-Hume – Enactive Hume. Interview with Tom Froese.Tom Froese, Karolina Karmaza, Przemysław Nowakowski & Witold Wachowski - 2011 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 2 (1).
    David Hume; Enactivism; Cognitive Science; Phenomenology; Philosophy of mind.
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  19. Hume – Cyber-Hume – Hume Enaktywny. Wywiad Z Tomem Froese.Tom Froese, Karolina Karmaza, Przemysław Nowakowski & Witold Wachowski - 2011 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 2 (1).
    David Hume; Enactivism; Cognitive Science; Phenomenology; Philosophy of mind.
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  20. Acali and Acid, Oil and Vinegar: Hume on Contrary Passions.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2017 - In Robert Stern & Alix Cohen (eds.), Thinking about the Emotions : A Philosophical History. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 150-171.
    In this paper, I present a close study of Hume’s treatment of contrary passions, asking questions about his description of the psychology of emotional difference and opposition. In treating this topic, I examine two opposed, but noteworthy, psychological functions that Hume imputes to human beings: sympathy and comparison. In brief, sympathy is the mechanism by which we share others’ feelings, and comparison is the function of our minds by which we find ourselves feeling passions opposed to others’ experiences. Sympathy can (...)
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  21. Hume's Table, Peacocke's Trees, the Tilted Penny and the Reversed Seeing-in Account.Robert Schroer - 2017 - Mind and Language 32 (2):209-230.
    In seeing a tilted penny, we are experientially aware of both its circularity and another shape, which I dub ‘β-ellipticality’. Some claim that our experiential awareness of the intrinsic shapes/sizes of everyday objects depends upon our experiential awareness of β-shapes/β-sizes. In contrast, I maintain that β-property experiences are the result of what Richard Wollheim calls ‘seeing-in’, but run in reverse: instead of seeing a three-dimensional object in a flat surface, we see a flat surface in a three-dimensional object. Using this (...)
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  22. Reid on Favors, Injuries, and the Natural Virtue of Justice.Lewis Powell & Gideon Yaffe - 2015 - In Todd Buras & Rebecca Copenhaver (eds.), Thomas Reid on Mind, Knowledge and Value. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 249-266.
    Reid argues that Hume’s claim that justice is an artificial virtue is inconsistent with the fact that gratitude is a natural sentiment. This chapter shows that Reid’s argument succeeds only given a philosophy of mind and action that Hume rejects. Among other things, Reid assumes that one can conceive of one of a pair of contradictories only if one can conceive of the other—a claim that Hume denies. So, in the case of justice, the disagreement between Hume and Reid is, (...)
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  23. Daniel E. Flage, "David Hume's Theory of Mind". [REVIEW]Nathan Brett - 1993 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (1):141.
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  24. Self-Knowledge, Externalism, and Skepticism.Brian Mclaughlin & David Owens - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (74):93-142.
    In recent years, some philosophers have claimed that we can know a priori that certain external world skeptical hypotheses are false on the basis of a priori knowledge that we are in certain kinds of mental states, and a priori knowledge that those mental states are individuated by contingent environmental factors. Appealing to a distinction between weak and strong a priority, I argue that weakly a priori arguments of this sort would beg the question of whether the skeptical hypothesis under (...)
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  25. Locke Vs. Hume: Who Is the Better Concept-Empiricist?: Dialogue.Ruth Weintraub - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (3):481-500.
    ABSTRACT According to the received view, Hume is a much more rigorous and consistent concept-empiricist than Locke. Hume is supposed to have taken as a starting point Locke's meaning-empiricism, and worked out its full radical implications. Locke, by way of contrast, cowered from drawing his theory's strange consequences. The received view about Locke's and Hume's concept-empiricism is mistaken, I shall argue. Hume may be more uncompromising, but he is not more rigorous than Locke. It is not because of timidity that (...)
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  26. The Idea of Self East and West: A Comparison Between Buddhist Philosophy and the Philosophy of David Hume.Albert Adams - 1982 - Philosophy East and West 32 (2):228-229.
  27. Visualization as a Chief Source of the Psychology of Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume.A. Fraser - 1892 - Philosophical Review 1:221.
  28. Hume Variations.P. Carruthers - 2005 - Mind 114 (453):141-145.
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  29. Mind and Morality: An Examination of Hume’s Moral Psychology.Terence Penelhum - 1996 - Ethics 108 (3):630-633.
  30. Continuity, Consciousness, and Identity in Hurne's Philosophy.Keith E. Yandell - 1992 - Hume Studies 18 (2):255-274.
  31. The Psychologistic Foundations of Hume’s Critique of Mathematical Philosophy.Wayne Waxman - 1996 - Hume Studies 22 (1):123-167.
  32. Custom and Reason in Hume: A Kantian Reading of the First Book of the Treatise. [REVIEW]Paul Guyer - 2009 - Hume Studies 35 (1-2):236-239.
    Henry Allison offers a new understanding of Hume's theory of knowledge, as contained in the first book of his Treatise. Allison provides a comprehensive and detailed critical analysis of Hume's views on the subject, and an extensive comparison with Kant on a range of issues including space and time, causation, existence, and the self.
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  33. Once More Into the Labyrinth: Kail’s Realist Explanation of Hume’s Second Thoughts About Personal Identity.Don Garrett - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):77-87.
    P. J. E. Kail's Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy is an excellent book, consisting—like Hume's Treatise itself—of three excellent parts. I will comment on one central aspect of its second part: its explanation of the source of the second thoughts that Hume famously expressed, with a frustrating lack of specificity, about his own initial discussion of personal identity in the Treatise.As is well known, Hume holds in the section "Of personal identity" (T 1.4.6) that a self, mind, or person (...)
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  34. Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume. [REVIEW]Karen Stohr - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):114-117.
  35. On Friedman's Look.Daniel E. Flage - 1993 - Hume Studies 19 (1):187-197.
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  36. "Magic Buffalo" and Berkeley's Theory of Vision: Learning in Society.David M. Levy - 1993 - Hume Studies 19 (1):223-226.
  37. Hume’s Theory of Simple Perceptions Reconsidered.Daniel A. Schmicking - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (1):3-31.
    Hume’s division of perceptions into simple and complex has been criticized for being vague and perfunctory. Often the division is considered to be a rather weak part of his system, yet there is no agreement on its particular shortcomings and no consensus that it is totally impracticable. At the same time, the division between simple and complex perceptions has not attracted strong interest or attention from commentators. Most accounts consist of short paraphrases, some of which suggest a connection with Locke. (...)
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  38. The Vulgar Conception of Objects in “Of Skepticism with Regard to the Senses”.Stefanie Rocknak - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):67-90.
    In this paper, we see that contrary to most readings of T 1.4.2 in the Treatise, Hume does not think that objects are sense impressions. This means that Hume’s position on objects is not to be conflated with the vulgar perspective. Moreover, the vulgar perspective undergoes a marked transition in T 1.4.2, evolving from what we may call vulgar perspective I into vulgar perspective II. This paper presents the first detailed analysis of this evolution, which includes an explanation of T (...)
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  39. Hume's Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW]Daniel E. Flage - 1983 - Hume Studies 9 (1):82-88.
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  40. Hume in the Prussian Academy: Jean Bernard Merian’s “On the Phenomenalism of David Hume”.John Christian Laursen, Richard H. Popkin & Peter Briscoe - 1997 - Hume Studies 23 (1):153-177.
  41. Projection and Realism in Hume’s Philosophy. [REVIEW]Stephen Buckle - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (1):163-165.
  42. Hume on the Abstract Idea of Existence: Comments on Cummins' "Hume on the Idea of Existence".Fred Wilson - 1991 - Hume Studies 17 (2):167-201.
  43. Hume’s Psychological Explanation of the Idea of Causality.A. K. Phalén - 1977 - International Philosophical Quarterly 17 (1):43-57.
  44. Hume’s Theory of Consciousness. [REVIEW]Daniel E. Flage - 1996 - International Philosophical Quarterly 36 (2):236-238.
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  45. Imagery: From Hume to Cognitive Science.Kenneth J. Bower - 1984 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 14 (2):217-234.
    Hume said that to have a memory image of some individual, x, is to perceive a ‘faint copy’ of some prior perception of x. This classical view of memory images includes three distinct claims: Images and percepts are mental entities which serve as objects for a ‘direct’ or ‘non-inferential’ perception. A memory image of some individual, x, shares numerous properties with some prior perception of x.
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  46. Hume’s Reflections on the Identity and Simplicity of Mind.Donald C. Ainslie - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):557-578.
    The article presents a new interpretation of Hume’s treatment of personal identity, and his later rejection of it in the “Appendix” to the Treatise. Hume’s project, on this interpretation, is to explain beliefs about persons that arise primarily within philosophical projects, not in everyday life. The belief in the identity and simplicity of the mind as a bundle of perceptions is an abstruse belief, not one held by the “vulgar” who rarely turn their minds on themselves so as to think (...)
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  47. Hume’s Empirical Argument for Empiricism.Richard Double - 1978 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 16 (4):329-337.
  48. Psychologism and Cognitive Theory in Hume and Kant: A Response to Kitcher.Claudia M. Schmidt - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):621-641.
  49. Mind and Morality: An Examination of Hume’s Moral Psychology. [REVIEW]Oliver A. Johnson - 2002 - International Studies in Philosophy 34 (4):167-168.
  50. Udo Thiel. The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume. [REVIEW]Anik Waldow - 2014 - Hume Studies 40 (2):301-304.
    This monograph is an important book for anyone interested in the topic of consciousness and personal identity in early modern thought. It offers a rich overview of the vast array of writers reflecting on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century conceptions of persons, their responsibilities, the issue of immortality, and the development of an account of consciousness based on the way in which minds relate to their own thoughts and feelings. It traces the lines of influence from the scholastic background to Descartes and (...)
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