This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

1 found
Order:
  1. Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.David Hume - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    Long before the current dispute in the USA about the teaching of evolution, Hume's dialogues presented and critically analyzed the idea of intelligent design. What should we teach our children about the creation of the world? What should we teach them about religion? The characters Demea, Cleanthes, and Philo passionately present and defend different answers to that question. Demea opens the dialogue with a position derived from René Descartes and Father Malebranche — God's nature is a mystery, but God's existence (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  2. Enlightenment and Secularism. Foreword From the Guest Editor.Anna Tomaszewska - 2017 - Diametros 54:1-6.
  3. Why Did Hume Not Become an Atheist?: The Influence of Butler on Hume's Dialogues.Naoki Yajima - 2017 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 15 (3):249-260.
    This article aims to illuminate the background and intention of Hume's Dialogues. It argues that ‘Cleanthes’ is significantly modeled after Butler's thought by showing the connection between Part IX of the Dialogues and Butler's early correspondence with Clarke regarding the concepts of probability and conceivability. This clarifies Philo's ‘reversal’ in Part XII. Butler's theory of probability provides a clue to Hume's moderate skepticism which stops short of endorsing atheism. Hume presents a philosophical narrative in which readers are invited to entertain (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Hume on Prophecy.Paddy Jane Mcshane - 2016 - Religious Studies 52 (2):213-221.
  5. Hume's Philosophy of Irreligion and the Myth of British Empiricism.Paul Russell - 2016 - In The Oxford Handbook of HUME. New York, NY, USA: pp. 109-37.
    This chapter outlines an alternative interpretation of Hume’s philosophy, one that aims, among other things, to explain some of the most perplexing puzzles concerning the relationship between Hume’s skepticism and his naturalism. The key to solving these puzzles, it is argued, rests with recognizing Hume’s fundamental irreligious aims and objectives, beginning with his first and greatest work, A Treatise of Human Nature. The irreligious interpretation not only reconfigures our understanding of the unity and structure of Hume’s thought, it also provides (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Religion and Its Natural History.P. J. E. Kail - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (3):675-689.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Economy of the Flesh: Nature and Economy in David Hume and Adam Smith.Jonathan Pimentel - 2014 - Dissertation, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Hume’s Rejection of Hutcheson’s Moral Theology.Miguel A. Badía Cabrera - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (4):1-12.
    Hume did not criticize Hutcheson’s moral-empirical argument in his published philosophical works, even though he forcefully denied, especially in Parts X and XI of the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, that we could empirically prove the moral attributes of the Deity. Yet he seemingly rejected this particular reasoning in a famous letter to Hutcheson, dated March 16, 1740. Hutcheson’s claim that our moral sense is a likely to be expected effect of divine benevolence and Hume’s critique of this claim are analyzed (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. The Natural Foundations of Religion.Mark Collier - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 27 (5):665-680.
    In the Natural history of religion, Hume attempts to understand the origin of our folk belief in gods and spirits. These investigations are not, however, purely descriptive. Hume demonstrates that ontological commitment to supernatural agents depends on motivated reasoning and illusions of control. These beliefs cannot, then, be reflectively endorsed. This proposal must be taken seriously because it receives support from recent work on our psychological responses to uncertainty. It also compares quite favorably with its main competitors in the cognitive (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. The Absence of God and Its Contextual Significance for Hume.David Fergusson - 2013 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (1):69-85.
    Hume's thoroughgoing religious scepticism is set within the context of the Scottish Enlightenment. Against some interpreters, it is argued that, although elusive, his ‘attenuated deism’ (Gaskin) is not wholly dismissive of all forms of religious thought and practice. His position is further compared with contemporary expressions of ‘new atheism’. Despite some obvious similarities, Hume's position is judged more nuanced both in terms of content and rhetorical strategy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11. The Deity, Figured and Disfigured: Hume on Philosophical Theism and Vulgar Religion.Lee Hardy - 2013 - In Jeanine Diller & Asa Kasher (eds.), Models of God and Alternative Ultimate Realities. Springer. pp. 699--707.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Hume, David: Religion.C. Lorkowski - 2013 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    David Hume: Religion David Hume (1711-1776) was called “Saint David” and “The Good David” by his friends, but his adversaries knew him as “The Great Infidel.” His contributions to religion have had a lasting impact and contemporary significance. Taken individually, Hume gives novel insights into many aspects of revealed and natural theology. When taken together, […].
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Subversive Explanations.Charles Pigden - 2013 - In Gregory Dawes & James Maclaurin (eds.), A New Science of Religion,. Routledge. pp. 147-161..
    Can an explanation of a set of beliefs cast doubt on the things believed? In particular, can an evolutionary explanation of religious beliefs call the contents of those beliefs into question? Yes - under certain circumstances. I distinguish between natural histories of beliefs and genealogies. A natural history of a set of beliefs is an explanation that puts them down to naturalistic causes. (I try to give an account of natural explanations which favors a certain kind of ‘methodological atheism’ without (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14. Causation, Cosmology and the Limits of Reason.Paul Russell - 2013 - In James Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth-Century,. New York, NY, USA: pp. 599-620.
    For well over a century the dominant narrative covering the major thinkers and themes of early modern British philosophy has been that of “British Empiricism”, within which the great triumvirate of Locke-Berkeley-Hume are taken to be the dominant figures. Although it is now common to question this schema as a way of analyzing and understanding the period in question, it continues to command considerable authority and acceptance. (One likely reason for this is that no credible or plausible alternatives structures or (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The End of Empire and the Death of Religion : A Reconsideration of Hume's Later Political Thought.Moritz Baumstark - 2012 - In Ruth Savage (ed.), Philosophy and Religion in Enlightenment Britain: New Case Studies. Oxford University Press.
    This essay reconsiders David Hume’s thinking on the fate of the British Empire and the future of established religion. It provides a detailed reconstruction of the development of Hume’s views on Britain’s successive attempts to impose or regain its authority over its North American colonies and compares these views with the stance taken during the American Crisis by Adam Smith and Josiah Tucker. Fresh light is shed on this area of Hume’s later political thought by a new letter, appended to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. A Very Short Essay on Religion.Simon Blackburn - 2012 - Think 11 (32):33-36.
    My impression is that the fire-breathing atheists about whom we hear so much – the celebrated quartet of Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens, Sam Harris, and Dan Dennett – think of religious commitments in terms of mistaken or at least hopelessly improbable and therefore irrational ontology. Believers think that something exists, but the overwhelmingly probable truth is that it does not. I may be wrong that this is what they think, but whether they do so or not, I am sure others (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Spinoza and Hume on Religion as a Natural Phenomenon.Herman De Dijn - 2012 - Hume Studies 38 (1):3-21.
    Spinoza and Hume are two naturalist philosophers who were among the first modern thinkers to study religion as a natural phenomenon. There undoubtedly are similarities in their accounts of the origin of religion in imagination and passion . But those who see Hume as a crypto-Spinozist are nevertheless confronted with serious differences between the two philosophers with respect to their understanding of religion and its various forms. These differences concern fundamental issues like the meaning and acceptability of the notion of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. What's True About Hume's 'True Religion'?Don Garrett - 2012 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 10 (2):199-220.
    Despite his well-known criticisms of popular religion, Hume refers in seemingly complimentary terms to ‘true religion’; in Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, his character Philo goes so far as to express ‘veneration for’ it. This paper addresses three questions. First, did Hume himself really approve of something that he called ‘true religion’? Second, what did he mean by calling it ‘true’? Third, what did he take it to be? By appeal to some of his key doctrines about causation and probability, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  19. Paul Russell, The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008). [REVIEW]Lorenzo Greco - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):432-35.
  20. Hume's 'Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion'. By Andrew Pyle. [REVIEW]Eugene Heath - 2012 - The European Legacy 17 (4):546 - 547.
    The European Legacy, Volume 17, Issue 4, Page 546-547, July 2012.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Psychological Explanations of Religious Belief.David O'Connor - 2012 - In Alan Bailey & Dan O'Brien (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Hume. Continuum. pp. 265.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Skepticism and Beliefs in the Religious Treatise of Human Nature.Livia Guimaraes - 2011 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 52 (124):509-528.
  23. Creencias religiosas superficiales, clérigos hipócritas y control secular de la Iglesia. Tres elementos del pensamiento de Hume.Gerardo López Sastre - 2011 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 52:173-188.
    hay una importante contradicción en el pensamiento de Hume. Por una parte sostiene que las creencias religiosas son en el fondo bastante débiles, pero por otra parte se las hace responsables de importantes males a nivel social. Esto se complementa con una teoría donde se insiste en la hipocresía de la profesión eclesiástica. El resultado de la confluencia de estas tesis es una propuesta de tolerancia y de control secular de la Iglesia, porque es en ese contexto donde las creencias (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Hume Versus Kant: Faith, Reason and Feeling.John Milbank - 2011 - Modern Theology 27 (2):276-297.
  25. The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion. [REVIEW]Peter Millican - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):348-353.
    (2011). The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 348-353.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. The Drama of Reason: Hume's Dialogue Concerning Natural Religion and the Antinomies of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason.Conor Barry - 2010 - Analecta Hermeneutica 2.
  27. The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion. [REVIEW]Don Garrett - 2010 - Philosophical Review 119 (1):108-112.
    Although it is widely recognized that David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature belongs among the greatest works of philosophy, there is little agreement about the correct way to interpret his fundamental intentions. It is an established orthodoxy among almost all commentators that skepticism and naturalism are the two dominant themes in this work. The difficulty has been, however, that Hume's skeptical arguments and commitments appear to undermine and discredit his naturalistic ambition to contribute to "the science of man". This (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. The Riddle of Hume's Treatise :Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion. [REVIEW]Colin Heydt - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (3):401-402.
    Paul Russell begins his book by rightly noting, "almost all commentators over the past two and a half centuries have agreed that Hume's intentions in the Treatise should be interpreted in terms of two general themes: skepticism and naturalism" (vii). The skeptical reading interprets Hume's principal aim as showing that "our 'common sense beliefs' (e.g. belief in causality, independent existence of bodies, in the self, etc.) lack any foundation in reason" (4). The naturalist reading interprets Hume's aims according to the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. Spectres of False Divinity: Hume's Moral Atheism.Thomas Holden - 2010 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Spectres of False Divinity presents a historical and critical interpretation of Hume's rejection of the existence of a deity with moral attributes. In Hume's view, no first cause or designer responsible for the ordered universe could possibly have moral attributes; nor could the existence of such a being have any real implications for human practice or conduct. Hume's case for this 'moral atheism' is a central plank of both his naturalistic agenda in metaphysics and his secularizing program in moral theory. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  30. Précis of Projection and Realism in Hume’s Philosophy.P. J. E. Kail - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):61-65.
    The title of my book, Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy, might mislead. One might protest, with some justification, that since neither "projection" nor "realism" is Hume's term and that both carry a severe threat of anachronism, discussing them in connection with Hume is misguided. Why might the readers of this journal wish to read such a work?Well, the first thing to note is that Hume's name has come to be associated with the metaphor of projection, understood as having some (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Hume's Naturalistic Critique of Religion.Peter Kail - 2010 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 72 (3):481.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Beyond the Calm Sunshine of the Mind. Hume on Morality and Religion.Willem Lemmens - 2010 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 72 (3):423-460.
  33. Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy. By P. J. E. Kail. [REVIEW]Donald C. Ainslie - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (2):292-296.
    Peter Kail’s comprehensive, thoughtful, and challenging book focuses on Hume’s use of projectionFthe appeal to mental phenomena to explain manifest features of the worldFin his treatments of external objects, causation, and morality. Almost all interpreters of Hume acknowledge a role for projection, but Kail is the first to unpack the metaphor, and to show the different ways in which projection works in different domains.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Number, Form, Content: Hume's Dialogues, Number Nine: Gene Fendt.Gene Fendt - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (3):393-412.
    This paper's aim is threefold. First, I wish to show that there is an analogy in section nine that arises out of the interaction of the interlocutors; this analogy is, or has, a certain comic adequatic to the traditional arguments about proofs for the existence of God. Second, Philo's seemingly inconsequential example of the strange necessity of products of 9 in section nine is a perfected analogy of the broken arguments actually given in that section, destroying Philo's earlier arguments. Finally, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Hume on Religion.J. C. A. Gaskin - 2009 - In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Anne Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  36. Part Six: Hume. Skepticism and Religious Belief in A Treatise of Human Nature.Lívia Guimarães - 2009 - In Maia Neto, José Raimundo, Gianni Paganini & John Christian Laursen (eds.), Skepticism in the Modern Age: Building on the Work of Richard Popkin. Brill.
  37. Skepticism and Religious Belief in A Treatise of Human Nature.Livia Guimaraes - 2009 - In Maia Neto, José Raimundo, Gianni Paganini & John Christian Laursen (eds.), Skepticism in the Modern Age: Building on the Work of Richard Popkin. Brill.
  38. Timothy S. Yoder, Hume on God: Irony, Deism and Genuine Theism. [REVIEW]Kevin J. Harrelson - 2009 - Philosophy in Review 29 (4):306.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Review: P. J. E. Kail: Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy. [REVIEW]L. E. Loeb - 2009 - Mind 118 (469):181-185.
  40. Agnosticisme et religion chez Pascal et Hume.Bernardo Pérez Andreo - 2009 - Revue des Sciences Philosophiques Et Théologiques 93 (1):59-67.
  41. EIGHTEEN. Hume on Religion.BernardHG Williams - 2009 - In The Sense of the Past: Essays in the History of Philosophy. Princeton University Press. pp. 267-274.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. In Defense of Natural Theology: A Post-Humean Assessment.Paul C. Anders - 2008 - Faith and Philosophy 25 (1):102-106.
  43. Andrew Pyle, Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. [REVIEW]Alan Bailey - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28 (4):294-296.
  44. Projection and Realism in Hume’s Philosophy. [REVIEW]Stephen Buckle - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (1):163-165.
  45. Review: P. J. E. Kail, Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy[REVIEW]Angela Coventry - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (7).
  46. The Existence of God: Mulla Sadra's Seddiqin Argument Vs. Criticisms of Kant and Hume.Ayatollahy Hamidreza - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (2):283 - 285.
  47. Hume’s “Farther Scenes”: Maupertuis and Buffon in the Dialogues.Peter Knox-Shaw - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):209-230.
    While numerous sources have been found for the ideas expressed by Cleanthes and Demea in the Dialogues, Philo’s thoughts have commonly been taken to originate with Hume. It is clear, however, both from internal and external evidence, that Hume drew for his (sometimes wayward) spokesman on that mid-century ferment in the life sciences that Denis Diderot described as a “revolution.” The restoration of this context—obscured by the late publication of the Dialogues—suggests that Philo’s celebrated critique of theism is merely one (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48. Enthousiasme et superstition à partir de l'Histoire d'Angleterre de Hume.Éléonore Le Jallé - 2008 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 59 (3):351-363.
    L’objet de cet article est de confronter les thèses de l’essai de Hume Superstition et enthousiasme, paru en 1741 dans le recueil des Essais moraux et politiques, à quelques-uns des développements que Hume consacre à ces deux formes de religion ou à ces deux modalités de la religion dans son Histoire d’Angleterre, parue entre 1754 et 1761. Il s’agira ainsi de contribuer à restituer, grâce à un examen de l’Histoire, l’intégralité de la position de Hume sur la question de la (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Leaving the “Real Hume” in Peace and Reading the Dialogues From a Moral Perspective.Alon Segev - 2008 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (2):1-12.
    This paper offers a new reading of Hume’s much discussed Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (1779/2000) which shows that, in contrast to what commentators tend to ascribe to Hume, the crux of the text is not epistemological-ontological – that is, not the arguments in favour of and against God’s existence – but moral. It is shown that, although most of the epistemologicalontological pro-and-contra arguments are quite weak, Hume’s interlocutors nevertheless cling to their theses from beginning to end, with the reason for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Review of Paul Russell, The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion[REVIEW]Rico Vitz - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (7).