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  1. Universal Gravitation and the (Un)Intelligibility of Natural Philosophy.Matias Slavov - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (1):129-157.
    This article centers on Hume’s position on the intelligibility of natural philosophy. To that end, the controversy surrounding universal gravitation shall be scrutinized. It is very well-known that Hume sides with the Newtonian experimentalist approach rather than with the Leibnizian demand for intelligibility. However, what is not clear is Hume’s overall position on the intelligibility of natural philosophy. It shall be argued that Hume declines Leibniz’s principle of intelligibility. However, Hume does not eschew intelligibility altogether; his concept of causation itself (...)
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  2. Hume's Natural Philosophy and Philosophy of Physical Science.Matias Kimi Slavov - forthcoming - London: Bloomsbury Academic.
  3. Causality and Hume’s Foundational Project.Miren Boehm - 2018 - In Angela Coventry & Alexander Sager (eds.), The Humean Mind. Routledge.
    The last few decades have witnessed intense debates in Hume scholarship concerning Hume’s account of causation. At the core of the “old–new Hume” debate is the question of whether causation for Hume is more than mere regularity, in particular, whether Hume countenances necessary connections in mind-independent nature. This chapter assesses this debate against the background of Hume’s “foundational project” in the Treatise. The question of the role and import of Hume’s account of the idea of cause is examined and compared (...)
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  4. A Chemistry of Human Nature: Chemical Imagery in Hume’s Treatise.Tamás Demeter - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (2-3):208-228.
  5. A Chemistry of Human Nature: Chemical Imagery in Hume’s Treatise.Tamás Demeter - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (2-3):208-228.
  6. Dutra, Hume E Goodman.João Paulo Monteiro - 1997 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 1 (2):291-296.
  7. Probability and Hume's Inductive Scepticism. [REVIEW]Michael Williams - 1975 - Philosophical Review 84 (3):453.
  8. Hume’s Fork and Mixed Mathematics.Matias Slavov - 2017 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 99 (1):102-119.
    Given the sharp distinction that follows from Hume’s Fork, the proper epistemic status of propositions of mixed mathematics seems to be a mystery. On the one hand, mathematical propositions concern the relation of ideas. They are intuitive and demonstratively certain. On the other hand, propositions of mixed mathematics, such as in Hume’s own example, the law of conservation of momentum, are also matter of fact propositions. They concern causal relations between species of objects, and, in this sense, they are not (...)
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  9. Pietro Sforza Pallavicino’s Quest for Principles of Induction.Sven K. Knebel - 2001 - The Monist 84 (4):502-519.
    Though it is well known that Hume composed his Treatise and the first version of his essay On Miracles during his stay in La Flèche, this fact has not received the attention it surely deserves. What may have induced a gentleman from Edinburgh to bury himself in the library of a Jesuit college? While every historian of early modern philosophy is quick to credit La Flèche with having provided Descartes’s education, Burton’s amazement that Hume himself never alludes to this unique (...)
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  10. Essays Concerning Hume's Natural Philosophy.Matias Slavov - 2016 - Dissertation, University of Jyväskylä
    The subject of this essay-based dissertation is Hume’s natural philosophy. The dissertation consists of four separate essays and an introduction. These essays do not only treat Hume’s views on the topic of natural philosophy, but his views are placed into a broader context of history of philosophy and science, physics in particular. The introductory section outlines the historical context, shows how the individual essays are connected, expounds what kind of research methodology has been used, and encapsulates the research contributions of (...)
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  11. Empiricism and Relationism Intertwined: Hume and Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity.Matias Slavov - 2016 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 31 (2):247-263.
    Einstein acknowledged that his reading of Hume influenced the development of his special theory of relativity. In this article, I juxtapose Hume’s philosophy with Einstein’s philosophical analysis related to his special relativity. I argue that there are two common points to be found in their writings, namely an empiricist theory of ideas and concepts, and a relationist ontology regarding space and time. The main thesis of this article is that these two points are intertwined in Hume and Einstein.
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  12. Giancarlo Carabelli, Mauricio Ferrarini, Eric Forbes y otros: Scienza e filosofia scozzese nell' etá di Hume. [REVIEW]M. Costa - 1978 - Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofia 4 (2):170.
Hume: Logic
  1. Frege's Cardinals Do Not Always Obey Hume's Principle.Gregory Landini - 2017 - History and Philosophy of Logic 38 (2):127-153.
    Hume's Principle, dear to neo-Logicists, maintains that equinumerosity is both necessary and sufficient for sameness of cardinal number. All the same, Whitehead demonstrated in Principia Mathematica's logic of relations that Cantor's power-class theorem entails that Hume's Principle admits of exceptions. Of course, Hume's Principle concerns cardinals and in Principia's ‘no-classes’ theory cardinals are not objects in Frege's sense. But this paper shows that the result applies as well to the theory of cardinal numbers as objects set out in Frege's Grundgesetze. (...)
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  2. Finitude and Hume’s Principle.Richard Heck - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 26 (6):589-617.
    The paper formulates and proves a strengthening of 'Frege's Theorem', which states that axioms for second-order arithmetic are derivable in second-order logic from Hume's Principle, which itself says that the number of Fs is the same as the number of Gs just in case the Fs and Gs are equinumerous. The improvement consists in restricting this claim to finite concepts, so that nothing is claimed about the circumstances under which infinite concepts have the same number. 'Finite Hume's Principle' also suffices (...)
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  3. Hume’s Principle, Beginnings.Albert Visser - 2011 - Review of Symbolic Logic 4 (1):114-129.
    In this note we derive Robinson???s Arithmetic from Hume???s Principle in the context of very weak theories of classes and relations.
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  4. Is Hume's Principle Analytic?Crispin Wright - 1999 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 40 (1):6-30.
    One recent `neologicist' claim is that what has come to be known as "Frege's Theorem"–the result that Hume's Principle, plus second-order logic, suffices for a proof of the Dedekind-Peano postulate–reinstates Frege's contention that arithmetic is analytic. This claim naturally depends upon the analyticity of Hume's Principle itself. The present paper reviews five misgivings that developed in various of George Boolos's writings. It observes that each of them really concerns not `analyticity' but either the truth of Hume's Principle or our entitlement (...)
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  5. Hume on Deduction.Charles Echelbarger - 1987 - Philosophy Research Archives 13:351-365.
    In this paper, the author discusses the feasibility of constructing a Humean model of the psychological realities of categorical propositions and syllogistic deduction by employing only Hume’s kinds of “ideas” and kinds of mental operations on ideas which Hume explicitly or implicitly postulated in his theory of discursive thinking.
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  6. Why, in 1902, Wasn't Frege Prepared to Accept Hume's Principle as the Primitive Law for His Logicist Program?Kazuyuki Nomoto - 2000 - Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 9 (5):219-230.
  7. Hume’s Principle and Axiom V Reconsidered: Critical Reflections on Frege and His Interpreters.Matthias Schirn - 2006 - Synthese 148 (1):171-227.
    In this paper, I shall discuss several topics related to Frege's paradigms of second-order abstraction principles and his logicism. The discussion includes a critical examination of some controversial views put forward mainly by Robin Jeshion, Tyler Burge, Crispin Wright, Richard Heck and John MacFarlane. In the introductory section, I try to shed light on the connection between logical abstraction and logical objects. The second section contains a critical appraisal of Frege's notion of evidence and its interpretation by Jeshion, the introduction (...)
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  8. In Good Company? On Hume’s Principle and the Assignment of Numbers to Infinite Concepts.Paolo Mancosu - 2015 - Review of Symbolic Logic 8 (2):370-410.
    In a recent article, I have explored the historical, mathematical, and philosophical issues related to the new theory of numerosities. The theory of numerosities provides a context in which to assign numerosities to infinite sets of natural numbers in such a way as to preserve the part-whole principle, namely if a set A is properly included in B then the numerosity of A is strictly less than the numerosity of B. Numerosities assignments differ from the standard assignment of size provided (...)
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  9. Tesi di Hume E Sistemi di Logica Deontica.Sergio Galvan - 1988 - Epistemologia 11 (2):183.
  10. How Far Can Hume is-Ought Thesis Be Generalized,(Vol 20, Pg 37, 1991).G. Schurz - 1995 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 24 (6):667-668.
  11. Axiom V and Hume's Principle in Frege's Foundational Project.Matthias Schirn - 1995 - Diálogos. Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad de Puerto Rico 30 (66):7-20.
  12. Comments on 'Hume's Master Argument'.Charles Pigden - 2010 - In Hume on Is and Ought. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 128-142.
    This is a commentary on Adrian Heathcote’s interesting paper ‘Hume’s Master Argument’. Heathcote contends that No-Ought-From-Is is primarily a logical thesis, a ban on Is/Ought inferences which Hume derives from the logic of Ockham. NOFI is thus a variation on what Heathcote calls ‘Hume’s Master Argument’, which he also deploys to prove that conclusions about the future (and therefore a-temporal generalizations) cannot be derived by reason from premises about the past, and that conclusions about external objects or other minds cannot (...)
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  13. What is Hume's Doctrine of Negation.Robert W. Burch - 1976 - International Logic Review 7:236-242.
  14. Three Interviews.Miro Brada - manuscript
    To support my Phd theses and results of my grant research in 1999, I asked 1) prominent chemist Antonín Holý, author of substances to treat hepatitis and HIV, about the indivisibility of the art and science (published in Slovak Narodna Obroda and Czech blisty,cz), 2) the distinguished economist William Baumol about the alternative activities (published in Slovak Nove Slovo, Czech Respekt and blisty.cz), 3) Nobel Laureate Clive Granger about the significance of the economics (published in 2004 in Czech weekly Tyden). (...)
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  15. Hume's "Dialectic".Dorothy P. Coleman - 1984 - Hume Studies 10 (2):139-155.
  16. The Concept of Body in Hume’s Treatise.Miren Boehm - 2013 - ProtoSociology:206-220.
    Hume’s views concerning the existence of body or external objects are notoriously difficult and intractable. The paper sheds light on the concept of body in Hume’s Treatise by defending three theses. First, that Hume’s fundamental tenet that the only objects that are present to the mind are perceptions must be understood as methodological, rather than metaphysical or epistemological. Second, that Hume considers legitimate the fundamental assumption of natural philosophy that through experience and observation we know body. Third, that many of (...)
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  17. Filling the Gaps in Hume’s Vacuums.Miren Boehm - 2012 - Hume Studies 38 (1):79-99.
    The paper addresses two difficulties that arise in Treatise 1.2.5. First, Hume appears to be inconsistent when he denies that we have an idea of a vacuum or empty space yet allows for the idea of an “invisible and intangible distance.” My solution to this difficulty is to develop the overlooked possibility that Hume does not take the invisible and intangible distance to be a distance at all. Second, although Hume denies that we have an idea of a vacuum, some (...)
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  18. Certainty, Necessity, and Knowledge in Hume's Treatise.Miren Boehm - 2013 - In Stanley Tweyman (ed.), David Hume, A Tercentenary Tribute [the version in PhilPapers is the accurate, final version of the paper].
    Hume appeals to different kinds of certainties and necessities in the Treatise. He contrasts the certainty that arises from intuition and demonstrative reasoning with the certainty that arises from causal reasoning. He denies that the causal maxim is absolutely or metaphysically necessary, but he nonetheless takes the causal maxim and ‘proofs’ to be necessary. The focus of this paper is the certainty and necessity involved in Hume’s concept of knowledge. I defend the view that intuitive certainty, in particular, is certainty (...)
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  19. Hume's Foundational Project in the Treatise.Miren Boehm - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):55-77.
    In the Introduction to the Treatise Hume very enthusiastically announces his project to provide a secure and solid foundation for the sciences by grounding them on his science of man. And Hume indicates in the Abstract that he carries out this project in the Treatise. But most interpreters do not believe that Hume's project comes to fruition. In this paper, I offer a general reading of what I call Hume's ‘foundational project’ in the Treatise, but I focus especially on Book (...)
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  20. Hume on Deduction.Charles Echelbarger - 1987 - Philosophy Research Archives 13:351-365.
    In this paper, the author discusses the feasibility of constructing a Humean model of the psychological realities of categorical propositions and syllogistic deduction by employing only Hume’s kinds of “ideas” and kinds of mental operations on ideas which Hume explicitly or implicitly postulated in his theory of discursive thinking.
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  21. The Contemporary Interest of an Old Doctrine.William Demopoulos - 1994 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:209 - 216.
    We call Frege's discovery that, in the context of second-order logic, Hume's principle-viz., The number of Fs = the number of Gs if, and only if, F a G, where F a G (the Fs and the Gs are in one-to-one correspondence) has its usual, second-order, explicit definition-implies the infinity of the natural numbers, Frege's theorem. We discuss whether this theorem can be marshalled in support of a possibly revised formulation of Frege's logicism.
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  22. Hume on Intuitive and and Demonstrative Inference.Robert A. Imlay - 1975 - Hume Studies 1 (2):31-47.
  23. A Humean Temporal Logic.Donald L. M. Baxter - 2000 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2000 (Analytic Philosophy and Logic):209-216.
    Hume argues that the idea of duration is just the idea of the manner in which several things in succession are arrayed. In other words, the idea of duration is the idea of successiveness. He concludes that all and only successions have duration. Hume also argues that there is such a thing as a steadfast object—something which co-exists with many things in succession, but which is not itself a succession. Thus, it seems that Hume has committed himself to a contradiction: (...)
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  24. Hume, Precursor of Modern Empiricism: An Analysis of His Opinions on Meaning, Metaphysics, Logic, and Mathematics.Farhang Zabeeh - 1960 - The Hague: M. Nijhoff.
  25. Hume = Small Hume.Jeffrey Ketland - 2002 - Analysis 62 (1):92–93.
    We can modify Hume’s Principle in the same manner that George Boolos suggested for modifying Frege’s Basic Law V. This leads to the principle Small Hume. Then, we can show that Small Hume is interderivable with Hume’s Principle.
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  26. Hume's Inductive Logic.Alberto Mura - 1998 - Synthese 115 (3):303-331.
    This paper presents a new account of Hume’s “probability of causes”. There are two main results attained in this investigation. The first, and perhaps the most significant, is that Hume developed – albeit informally – an essentially sound system of probabilistic inductive logic that turns out to be a powerful forerunner of Carnap’s systems. The Humean set of principles include, along with rules that turn out to be new for us, well known Carnapian principles, such as the axioms of semiregularity, (...)
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Hume: Philosophy of Mathematics
  1. 7. The Second-Order Idealism of David Hume.William Boos - 2018 - In Metamathematics and the Philosophical Tradition. De Gruyter. pp. 233-305.
  2. Hume on the Social Construction of Mathematical Knowledge.Tamás Demeter - unknown - Synthese 196 (9):3615-3631.
    Mathematics for Hume is the exemplary field of demonstrative knowledge. Ideally, this knowledge is a priori as it arises only from the comparison of ideas without any further empirical input; it is certain because demonstration consist of steps that are intuitively evident and infallible; and it is also necessary because the possibility of its falsity is inconceivable as it would imply a contradiction. But this is only the ideal, because demonstrative sciences are human enterprises and as such they are just (...)
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  3. Hume’s Principle, Beginnings.Albert Visser - 2011 - Review of Symbolic Logic 4 (1):114-129.
    In this note we derive Robinson???s Arithmetic from Hume???s Principle in the context of very weak theories of classes and relations.
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  4. Hume on Space and Geometry': A Rejounder to Flew's 'One Reservation.Rosemary Newman - 1982 - Hume Studies 8 (1):66-69.
  5. Infinite Divisibility and Actual Parts in Hume’s Treatise.Thomas Holden - 2002 - Hume Studies 28 (1):3-25.
    According to a standard interpretation of Hume’s argument against infinite divisibility, Hume is raising a purely formal problem for mathematical constructions of infinite divisibility, divorced from all thought of the stuffing or filling of actual physical continua. I resist this. Hume’s argument must be understood in the context of a popular early modern account of the metaphysical status of the parts of physical quantities. This interpretation disarms the standard mathematical objections to Hume’s reasoning; I also defend it on textual and (...)
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  6. The Psychologistic Foundations of Hume’s Critique of Mathematical Philosophy.Wayne Waxman - 1996 - Hume Studies 22 (1):123-167.
  7. On the Compatibility Between Euclidean Geometry and Hume’s Denial of Infinite Divisibility.Emil Badici - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):231-244.
    It has been argued that Hume’s denial of infinite divisibility entails the falsity of most of the familiar theorems of Euclidean geometry, including the Pythagorean theorem and the bisection theorem. I argue that Hume’s thesis that there are indivisibles is not incompatible with the Pythagorean theorem and other central theorems of Euclidean geometry, but only with those theorems that deal with matters of minuteness. The key to understanding Hume’s view of geometry is the distinction he draws between a precise and (...)
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  8. 3. Geometry as Scientia and as Applied Science: Hume’s Empiricist Account of Geometry.Fred Wilson - 2008 - In The External World and Our Knowledge of It: Hume's Critical Realism, an Exposition and a Defence. University of Toronto Press. pp. 254-305.
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  9. In Good Company? On Hume’s Principle and the Assignment of Numbers to Infinite Concepts.Paolo Mancosu - 2015 - Review of Symbolic Logic 8 (2):370-410.
    In a recent article, I have explored the historical, mathematical, and philosophical issues related to the new theory of numerosities. The theory of numerosities provides a context in which to assign numerosities to infinite sets of natural numbers in such a way as to preserve the part-whole principle, namely if a set A is properly included in B then the numerosity of A is strictly less than the numerosity of B. Numerosities assignments differ from the standard assignment of size provided (...)
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  10. Two Unpublished Essays on Mathematics in the Hume Papers.Lionel Gossman - 1960 - Journal of the History of Ideas 21 (1/4):442.
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  11. Hume on the Certainty and Necessity of Arithmetic.Scott W. Gaylord - 1996 - Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    David Hume's central distinction in the Treatise and Enquiry is between relations of ideas and matters of fact. Although most of the attention in the secondary literature is on the latter, I am directly concerned with analyzing Hume's characterization of relations of ideas. In particular, I analyze Hume's attempt to secure certainty and necessity within his empiricist system since these are the defining characteristics of Hume's perfect species of knowledge--arithmetic. The focus, then, is on how Hume justifies the special status (...)
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  12. Barrow e Hume sulla geometria: una teoria "classica" e una intuizione relativistica.Marina Frasca Spada - 1984 - Rivista di Filosofia 75 (3):353.
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