This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

72 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 72
  1. David Hume on Morals, Politics, and Society.Angela Coventry & Andrew Valls (eds.) - 2019 - Yale University Press.
    A key figure of the Scottish Enlightenment, David Hume was a major influence on thinkers ranging from Kant and Schopenhauer to Einstein and Popper, and his writings continue to be deeply relevant today. With four essays by leading Hume scholars exploring his complex intellectual legacy, this volume presents an overview of Hume’s moral, political, and social philosophy. Editors Angela Coventry and Andrew Valls bring together a selection of writings from Hume’s most important works, with contributors placing them in their appropriate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Reasoning with the Exclusionary Other: Classical Scenes for a Postradical Horizon.Carlos Palacios - 2019 - Critical Inquiry 46 (1):97-117.
    Thanks to Michel Foucault, one might say it has become possible to conceive that the political relevance of humanity in modern thought does not have to do with its “philosophical essence” but rather with its “nonessence.” Yet this very idea surfaced earlier in Western thought, at the time of the revolutionary turn towards a politicized humanitarianism, and helped to shape some crucial political strategies making up modern liberal democracy. Its potential eluded even Foucault. I contend that tracing the contours of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Between Commerce and Empire: David Hume, Colonial Slavery, and Commercial Incivility.Onur Ulas Ince - 2018 - History of Political Thought 39 (1):107-134.
    Eighteenth-century Enlightenment thought has recently been reclaimed as a robust, albeit short-lived, cosmopolitan critique of European imperialism. This essay complicates this interpretation through a study of David Hume’s reflections on commerce, empire, and slavery. I argue that while Hume condemned the colonial system of monopoly, war, and conquest, his strictures against empire did not extend to colonial slavery in the Atlantic. This was because colonial slavery represented a manifestly uncivil institution when judged by enlightened metropolitan sensibilities, yet also a decisively (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Jalousie.Frédéric Minner - 2018 - Encyclopédie Philosophique.
    On conçoit souvent la jalousie comme une émotion ayant pour objet les relations de proximité (amour, amitié, fratrie, etc.). Elle a généralement mauvaise presse et est typiquement envisagée comme une émotion moralement condamnable, voire comme un vice. Or, la jalousie ne porte pas uniquement sur les relations de proximité : elle peut également porter sur divers biens (prestige, richesses, biens matériels, privilèges, etc.). Par ailleurs, certains auteurs soutiennent que des cas de jalousie pourraient être moralement justifiés, voire que la jalousie (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Enlightenment and Secularism. Foreword From the Guest Editor.Anna Tomaszewska - 2017 - Diametros 54:1-6.
  6. La facción como condición de posibilidad de posibilidad de la libertad en David Hume.García Santiago Álvarez - 2016 - Bajo Palabra (16).
    This article shows how Hume, based on a definition of freedom as a historical process and an understanding of the faction as inevitable phenomenon in human political path, concludes that the harmful effects of the different factions do not crystallize, as in the case of justice and the origin of government, in a spontaneous balance, but require strategies in the executive and legislative to be controlled and reoriented in order to obtain from such control a fundamental socio-political advantage: the development (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Commerce and Politics in Hume's History of England by Jia Wei. [REVIEW]James A. Harris - 2016 - Hume Studies 42 (1-2):245-247.
    Jia Wei claims in the Introduction to Commerce and Politics in Hume's History of England that significant aspects of Hume's achievement as a historian have yet to be properly appreciated. She intends to shed new light on 'the relationship between the three Humes: Hume the political thinker, Hume the historian, and Hume the political economist'. She continues: More specifically, this book pays greater attention to broad social, economic, and institutional changes which Hume wove into an entirely innovative fabric of causation. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. On David Hume's "Forms of Moderation".Kelly M. S. Swope - 2016 - Hume Studies 42 (1):167-186.
    Treatise 2.3.6, “Of the influence of the imagination on the passions,” provides a magnified view into the relationship between motivation, morality, and politics in Hume’s philosophy. Here, Hume analyzes a “noted passage” from the history of antiquity in which the citizens of fifth-century Athens deliberated over whether to burn the ships of their neighboring Grecians after winning a decisive naval victory against the Persians. Hume finds the passage notable precisely because of a failure of the imagination to exert an influence (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Hume and the Historicity of Human Nature.Serge Grigoriev - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (1):118-139.
  10. Dennis C. Rasmussen, The Pragmatic Enlightenment: Recovering the Liberalism of Hume, Smith, Montesquieu, and Voltaire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. 349 Pp. $90.00 Hb. ISBN 9781107045002. [REVIEW]William Edward Morris - 2015 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 13 (2):141-145.
  11. Book Review: Extended Sentiments and Enlarged Interests: Hume’s Politics The Politics of Eloquence: David Hume’s Polite Rhetoric, by Marc Hanvelt and Hume’s Politics: Coordination and Crisis in the History of England, by Andrew SablThe Politics of Eloquence: David Hume’s Polite Rhetoric, by HanveltMarc. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012.Hume’s Politics: Coordination and Crisis in the History of England, by SablAndrew. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2012. [REVIEW]Ross Carroll - 2014 - Political Theory 42 (3):377-384.
  12. Hume.Don Garrett - 2014 - Routledge.
    Beginning with an overview of Hume's life and work, Don Garrett introduces in clear and accessible style the central aspects of Hume's thought. These include Hume's lifelong exploration of the human mind; his theories of inductive inference and causation; skepticism and personal identity; moral and political philosophy; aesthetics; and philosophy of religion. The final chapter considers the influence and legacy of Hume's thought today. Throughout, Garrett draws on and explains many of Hume's central works, including his Treatise of Human Nature (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  13. Hume and Reid on Political Economy.Giovanni B. Grandi - 2014 - Eighteenth-Century Thought 5:99-145.
    While Hume had a favorable opinion of the new commercial society, Reid envisioned a utopian system that would eliminate private property and substitute the profit incentive with a system of state-conferred honors. Reid’s predilection for a centralized command economy cannot be explained by his alleged discovery of market failures, and has to be considered in the context of his moral psychology. Hume tried to explain how the desire for gain that motivates the merchant leads to industry and frugality. These, in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. La Conservación Del Poder En David Hume.Santiago Álvarez García - 2013 - Eunomia 2:63-82.
    This article argues that the origin of the political principles and categories that Hume sets as essential to the preservation of political power and its effective exercise can be traced into the division of political agent that occurs as a result of the institution of justice and government in the origin of society. Their different roles and different degrees of freedom will determine, since then, and through political action and its irreversibility, the categories and the fundamental problems that Hume´s political (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Self-Interest and Sociability.Christian Maurer - 2013 - In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 291-314.
    The chapter analyses the debates on the relation between self-interest and sociability in eighteenth-century British moral philosophy. It focuses on the selfish hypothesis, i.e. on the egoistic theory that we are only motivated by self-interest or self-love, and that our sociability is not based on disinterested affections, such as benevolence. The selfish hypothesis is much debated especially in the early eighteenth century (Mandeville, Shaftesbury, Hutcheson, Butler, Clarke, Campbell, Gay), and then rather tacitly accepted (Hartley, Tucker, Paley) or rejected (Hume, Smith, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  16. A Cruel but Ancient Subjugation?: Understanding Hume’s Attack on Slavery.Margaret Watkins - 2013 - Hume Studies 39 (1):103-121.
    This essay argues that Hume’s criticism of slavery in “Of the Populousness of Ancient Nations,” despite its contribution to the British Enlightenment’s anti-slavery movement, is not truly abolitionist in character. Hume’s aim was not to put an end to contemporary slave practices or forestall their expansion. Nonetheless, the criticism of slavery proves significant for reasons that transcend the demographic questions of the essay. It supports an argument that Hume develops throughout the Essays and Political Discourses. The conclusion of this argument (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. Violence as the Origin of Institution (Deleuze with Hume and Saint-Just).Petar Bojanic - 2012 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 25 (1):79-90.
    The relation between violence and the institution was truly thematized for the first time in the writings of Hume, and in an entirely different way in Saint-Just's texts on the Republic and the institution. Gilles Deleuze's early works represent an original attempt at reconstruction of a possible dialogue between these two dissimilar authors. Regardless of the possibility of reconstruction of Deleuze's own theory of the institution , and analysis of the various combinations of the terms institution and revolution, the intention (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Chapter Seven. From Fénelon to Hume.Christopher Brooke - 2012 - In Philosophic Pride: Stoicism and Political Thought From Lipsius to Rousseau. Princeton University Press. pp. 149-180.
  19. Skottilainen valistus - David Hume.Jani Hakkarainen - 2012 - In Petri Koikkalainen and Paul-Erik Korvela (ed.), Klassiset poliittiset ajattelijat. Tampere: Vastapaino. pp. 299-339.
    The title in English: Scottish Enlightenment - David Hume. This is a chapter on Hume's political philosophy that I wrote to a Finnish textbook of the history of political thought.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 1: Texts.David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press UK.
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This first volume contains the critical text of David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature, followed by the shortin which Hume set out the key arguments of the larger work; the volume concludes with A Letter from a Gentleman to his Friend in Edinburgh, Hume's defence of the Treatise when it was under attack from ministers seeking to prevent Hume's appointment as Professor of (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. La Criminalización de la Desigualdad En la Teoría de la Justicia de David Hume.Santiago Álvarez García - 2011 - Universitas 9 (18):79-99.
    This work aims to study a specific part of the ethical and political thought of Scottish philosopher David Hume: his descriptions of the origin of justice and government. Both are analyzed in an attempt to clarify the treatment of inequality that it is offered by them. We describe how the particular process of criminalization of natural inequality begins to occur with the moralization of laws of justice after the first convention and how it is consolidated after the genesis of government. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. The Legitimating Role of Consent in International Law.Matthew Lister - 2011 - Chicago Journal of International Law 11 (2).
    According to many traditional accounts, one important difference between international and domestic law is that international law depends on the consent of the relevant parties (states) in a way that domestic law does not. In recent years this traditional account has been attacked both by philosophers such as Allen Buchanan and by lawyers and legal scholars working on international law. It is now safe to say that the view that consent plays an important foundational role in international law is a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23. Sympathie Restreinte Et Sympathie Étendue Dans le Traité de la Nature Humaine de David Hume.Philippe Blouin - 2010 - Gnosis 11 (3):1-15.
    Cet article consiste en une analyse critique de la notion de sympathie dansles deuxièmes et troisièmes tomes du *Traité de la Nature Humaine* de DavidHume. Il s’agit plus particulièrement de l’étude du passage de la sympathierestreinte à la sympathie étendue comme concept clé dans la philosophiepolitique de Hume. La lecture deleuzienne de Hume, telle qu’elle se donnedans *Empirisme et Subjectivité* est particulièrement mobilisée pour montreren quoi ce passage est représentatif des difficultés d’une philosophiepolitique qui, se voulant demeurer *empiriste*, doit passer (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. The Scottish Enlightenment, Unintended Consequences and the Science of Man.Craig Smith - 2009 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (1):9-28.
    It is a commonplace that the writers of eighteenth century Scotland played a key role in shaping the early practice of social science. This paper examines how this ‘Scottish’ contribution to the Enlightenment generation of social science was shaped by the fascination with unintended consequences. From Adam Smith's invisible hand to Hume's analysis of convention, through Ferguson's sociology, and Millar's discussion of rank, by way of Robertson's View of Progress, the concept of unintended consequences pervades the writing of the period. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25. Review of Christopher J. Finlay, Hume's Social Philosophy: Human Nature and Commercial Sociability in a Treatise of Human Nature[REVIEW]Lorraine Besser-Jones - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (4).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Essays on David Hume, Medical Men, and the Scottish Enlightenment: Industry, Knowledge, and Humanity.Roger L. Emerson - 2008 - Ashgate.
    The world in which the Scottish Enlightenment took shape -- Archibald Campbell, 3rd Duke of Argyll (1682-1761) : patronage and the creation of the Scottish Enlightenment -- How many Scots were enlightened? -- What did eighteenth-century Scottish students read? -- Our excellent and never to be forgotten friend : David Hume (26 April 1711- 25 August 1776) -- Hume's intellectual development : part II, 1711-1762 -- Hume's histories -- Hume's economics -- Numbering the medics -- Numbers and money -- Who (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27. Book ReviewsRussell Hardin,. David Hume: Moral and Political Theorist. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 260. $49.50. [REVIEW]Matthew Simpson - 2008 - Ethics 118 (3):549-553.
  28. David Hume Against the Contractualists of His Time.Gabriel Bertin de Almeida - 2007 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 48 (115):0-0.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Une critique d'explication par les causes finales: l'anticontractualisme de Hume. Une histoire naturelle du politique.Céline Bonicco - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (4):637-662.
    RÉSUMÉ: Cet article se propose de montrer comment la critique de la théorie contractualiste opérée par David Hume est la conséquence politique de son analyse de la causalité. Hume rejette le contractualisme avant tout pour des raisons méthodologiques : une explication par les causes finales n’est jamais une explication satisfaisante. Or, le contractualisme applique au domaine politique l’argument du desseinprésenté dans les Dialogues sur la religion naturelle. La genèse du politique déployée dans le Traité de la nature humaine doit alors (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Hume's Oscillating Civilization Theory.Ryu Susato - 2006 - History of European Ideas 32 (3):263-277.
    Hume's repeated mentions of the vicissitudes of civilization have thus far been neglected, overlooked, or misinterpreted by Hume scholars. Although his references to the “death” or “ruin” of a nation are somewhat hyperbolic, his cyclical view of history was neither mere rhetoric nor necessarily pessimistic. This paper aims to show that Hume's notion of historical fluctuations was deeply connected with his understanding of the universality of human nature. It also placed Hume in a strategic position from which he could criticize (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Non-Reductionist Naturalism: Nussbaum Between Aristotle and Hume.John M. Alexander - 2005 - Res Publica 11 (2):157-183.
    Martha Nussbaum proposes a universal list of human capabilities as the basis for fundamental political principles. She claims that the list, in an Aristotelian spirit, might be justified by an ongoing inquiry into valuable human functionings for the good life. Here I argue that the attractiveness of Nussbaum’s theory crucially depends on the philosophical possibility of a non-reductionist understanding of naturalism and on resolving the tensions between ethical and political aspects of the role of capabilities. Through a comparison of Nussbaum’s (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. “The Paradoxical Principle and Salutary Practice”: Hume on Toleration.Richard H. Dees - 2005 - Hume Studies 31 (1):145-164.
    David Hume is an ardent supporter of the practice of religions toleration. For Hume, toleration forms part of the background that makes progress in philosophy possible, and it accounts for the superiority of philosophical thought in England in the eighteenth century. As he puts it in the introduction to the Treatise: “the improvements in reason and philosophy can only be owing to a land of toleration and of liberty” (T Intro.7; SBN xvii).1 Similarly, the narrator of part 11 of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. Impressions of Hume.Marina Frasca-Spada & P. J. E. Kail (eds.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Impressions of Hume collects brand-new essays from leading scholars in different philosophical, historiographical, and literary traditions within which Hume is a canonical figure. To some his writings are vehicles for intuitions, problems, and arguments which are at the center of contemporary philosophical reflection; others locate Hume's views against the background of concerns and debates of his own time. Hume's texts may be read as highly sophisticated literary-cum-philosophical creations, or as moments in the construction of the ideology of modernity; these are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  34. Beauty, Morals, and Hume's Conception of Character.Timothy M. Costelloe - 2004 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (4):397 - 415.
  35. Hume’s Nonreductionist Philosophical Anthropology.Herman De Dijn - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):587-603.
    Hume's *A Treatise of Human Nature* constitutes a philosophical anthropology quite different from a philosophy of (self-)consciousness or of the subject. According to Hume, the Self or Subject is itself a product of human nature, that is, of the workings of a structured set of principles which explains all typically human phenomena. On the same basis, Hume discusses all "moral" subjects, such as science, morality and politics (including economics), art and religion as well as the different reflections about all these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. El origen del estado y la obediencia civil en Hume.M. Cinta Espuny Domingo - 2002 - A Parte Rei 23:1.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. 6. From Private Property in Hume and Locke to the Universality of Natural Laws.David Braybrooke - 2001 - In Natural Law Modernized. University of Toronto Press. pp. 147-177.
  38. Philosophical Melancholy and Delirium: Hume's Pathology of Philosophy.Marina Frasca-Spada - 2001 - Mind 110 (439):783-789.
  39. Précis of Cognition and Commitment in Hume’s Philosophy. [REVIEW]Don Garrett - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):185–189.
    Hume’s philosophical greatness is widely acknowledged, yet the interpretation of his philosophy is the subject of considerable disagreement and confusion. Cognition and Commitment in Hume’s Philosophy is intended to support critical discussion and evaluation of Hume’s philosophy by offering more accurate interpretations of his treatments of a number of central philosophical topics. The book has three main strategic goals: to isolate and explain Hume’s most fundamental philosophical aims, methods, and principles; to set out and elucidate the content and structure of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Replies. [REVIEW]Don Garrett - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):205–215.
    David Owen begins his contribution by setting out very clearly how my interpretation of Hume’s distinction between simple and complex perceptions helps to resolve some puzzles about apparent counterexamples to the two most fundamental principles of Hume’s cognitive psychology: the Copy Principle and the Separability Principle. His primary object of criticism is my interpretation of Hume’s famous conclusion that inductive inferences are “not determin’d by reason”. I am as grateful for Owen’s criticisms concerning my treatment of induction as I am (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41. Religion and Faction in Hume's Moral Philosophy (Review). [REVIEW]James Fieser - 1999 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (1):170-171.
  42. Religion and Faction in Hume’s Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW]Antony Flew - 1999 - International Philosophical Quarterly 39 (2):228-229.
  43. An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals.Tom L. Beauchamp (ed.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    This new edition of Hume's Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, published in the Oxford Philosophical Texts series, has been designed especially for the student reader. The text is preceded by a substantial introduction explaining the historical and intellectual background to the work and its relationship to the rest of Hume's philosophy. The volume also includes detailed explanatory notes on the text, a glossary of terms, and a section of supplementary readings.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  44. Humes Geschichte Englands. Religion Als Gefahr Für Fortschritt Und Zivilisation.A. Bayerl - 1997 - Aufklärung and Kritik 1.
  45. Hume on the Characters of Virtue.Richard H. Dees - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (1):45-64.
    In the world according to Hume, people are complicated creatures, with convoluted, often contradictory characters. Consider, for example, Hume's controversial assessment of Charles I: "The character of this prince, as that of most men, if not of all men, was mixed .... To consider him in the most favourable light, it may be affirmed, that his dignity was free from pride, his humanity from weakness, his bravery from rashness, his temperance from austerity, his frugality from avarice .... To speak the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  46. Hume, Smith and Critical Realism.Sheila C. Dow - 1997 - University of Stirling, Department of Economics.
  47. De David Et Jean-Jacques À Jean Et À Jacques or On the Idea of a Perfect Commonwealth, On Liberty and Representation, On Popular Consent and On Referendum : Un Échange Inconnu Entre Hume Et Rousseau. A Recently Rediscovered Exchange Beetween Hume and Rousseau.Josiane Boulad-Ayoub - 1996 - Philosophiques 23 (1):151-161.
  48. Opinion and Reform in Hume's Political Philosophy. [REVIEW]Donald Becker - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 47 (3):641-642.
    Stewart's purpose is to show that Hume is not a political conservative, but is better understood as a liberal. The author is reacting against several recent works on Hume: David Miller's Philosophy and Ideology in Hume's Political Thought, Donald W. Livingston's Hume's Philosophy of Common Life, and Frederick G. Whelan's Order and Artifice in Hume's Political Philosophy. These "all share, with variations, the nineteenth-century view that Hume's epistemology led him to conservatism". Stewart acknowledges that the term "conservative" is used in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. The Rhapsody of Public Debt: David Hume and Voluntary State Bankruptcy.Istvan Hont - 1993 - In Phillipson & Skinner (eds.), Political Discourse in Early Modern Britain.
  50. The Cambridge Companion to Hume.David Fate Norton (ed.) - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume is, arguably, the most important philosopher ever to have written in English. Although best known for his contributions to epistemology, metaphysics, and the philosophy of religion, Hume also made substantial and influential contributions to psychology and the philosophy of mind, ethics, the philosophy of science, political and economic theory, political and social history, and, to a lesser extent, aesthetic and literary theory. All facets of Hume's output are discussed in this volume, the first genuinely comprehensive overview of his (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 72