This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

26 found
Order:
  1. added 2019-07-26
    On Pride.Lorenzo Greco - 2019 - Humana Mente 12 (35):101-123.
    In this essay, I offer a vindication of pride. I start by presenting the Christian condemnation of pride as the cardinal sin. I subsequently examine Mandeville’s line of argument whereby pride is beneficial to society, although remaining a vice for the individual. Finally, I focus on, and endorse, the analysis of pride formulated by Hume, for whom pride qualifies instead as a virtue. This is because pride not only contributes to making society flourish but also stabilizes the virtuous agent by (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2019-06-06
    Natural Virtues, Natural Vices: ANNETTE C. BAIER.Annette C. Baier - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (1):24-34.
    David Hume has been invoked by those who want to found morality on human nature as well as by their critics. He is credited with showing us the fallacy of moving from premises about what is the case to conclusions about what ought to be the case; and yet, just a few pages after the famous is-ought remarks in A Treatise of Human Nature, he embarks on his equally famous derivation of the obligations of justice from facts about the cooperative (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. added 2019-03-18
    Associative Virtues and Hume's Narrow Circle.Erin Frykholm - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (1):612-637.
    This article offers a straightforward reading of Hume's ‘narrow circle’ – the boundary employed to define those with whom we sympathize in assessing an agent's moral character – that follows from a more careful look at his account of virtue. Hume employs a principle that can be understood as a virtue ethical equivalent of associative obligation, which thereby delimits the boundaries of this circle. This reading avoids concerns about unjustified partiality, moral blind spots, and demandingness, and shows a clear path (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. added 2018-06-14
    Cultivating Strength of Mind: Hume on the Government of the Passions and Artificial Virtue.Lauren Kopajtic - 2015 - Hume Studies 41 (2):201-229.
    Several authors have recently noted Hume’s relative silence on the virtue of strength of mind and how it is developed. In this paper I suggest that Hume had good reasons for this silence, and I argue that Hume’s discussion of artificial virtue, especially the virtue of allegiance, reveals a complex view of the limitations on human efforts at self-reform. Further, it reveals the need for government and externally-imposed regulative structures to enable the development of strength of mind. I argue that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. added 2017-06-07
    Delicate Magnanimity: Hume on the Advantages of Taste.Margaret Watkins - 2009 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (4):389 - 408.
    This article argues that Hume's brief essay, "Of the Delicacy of Taste and Passion," offers resources for three claims: (1) Delicate taste correlates with self-sufficiency and thus with a particularly Humean form of Magnanimity -- greatness of mind; (2) Delicate taste improves the capacity for profound friendships, characterized by mutual admiration and true compassion; and (3) magnanimity and compassion are thus not necessarily in tension with one another and may even proceed from and support harmony of character. These claims, in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. added 2017-02-28
    Love’s Enlightenment: Rethinking Charity in Modernity.Ryan Patrick Hanley - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    A number of prominent moral philosophers and political theorists have recently called for a recovery of love. But what do we mean when we speak of love today? Love's Enlightenment examines four key conceptions of other-directedness that transformed the meaning of love and helped to shape the way we understand love today: Hume's theory of humanity, Rousseau's theory of pity, Smith's theory of sympathy, and Kant's theory of love. It argues that these four Enlightenment theories are united by a shared (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. added 2016-12-08
    Sieges, Shipwrecks, and Sensible Knaves: Justice and Utility in Butler and Hume.John R. Bowlin - 2000 - Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2):253 - 280.
    By examining the theories of justice developed by Joseph Butler and David Hume, the author discloses the conceptual limits of their moral naturalism. Butler was unable to accommodate the possibility that justice is, at least to some extent, a social convention. Hume, who more presciently tried to spell out the conventional character of justice, was unable to carry through that project within the framework of his moral naturalism. These limits have gone unnoticed, largely because Butler and Hume have been misinterpreted, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. added 2015-09-21
    Hume e l'etica della virtù.Lorenzo Greco - 2012 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 25 (67):603-15.
    In this paper, I present some reasons in favour of an interpretation of Hume’s moral philosophy as a brand new form of "virtue ethics." By discussing some specific issues within the secondary literature in favour and against this kind of reading, I argue that Hume offers better philosophical tools to redefine the basic notion of virtue ethics than the neo-Aristotelian alternative. In particular, I maintain that the strength of Hume’s proposal lies in its pointing toward the unity of character instead (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. added 2015-09-04
    Passion and Value in Hume's Treatise. [REVIEW]C. E. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (4):745-745.
    This critical work proceeds in a scholarly manner to show that Hume's Treatise, which has been ignored as a source for his moral theory, is of definite value for a correct and complete interpretation of his ethics. It is the author's contention that Hume's moral theory is closely connected to his psychology, which is set out in the Treatise. The author presents various interpretations he considers incorrect, exposing their faults and then suggesting an alternative view. Árdal is not attempting a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. added 2015-08-29
    Hume on the Characters of Virtue.Richard H. Dees - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (1):45-64.
    In the world according to Hume, people are complicated creatures, with convoluted, often contradictory characters. Consider, for example, Hume's controversial assessment of Charles I: "The character of this prince, as that of most men, if not of all men, was mixed .... To consider him in the most favourable light, it may be affirmed, that his dignity was free from pride, his humanity from weakness, his bravery from rashness, his temperance from austerity, his frugality from avarice .... To speak the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  11. added 2015-08-13
    Strength of Mind and the Calm and Violent Passions.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (3):1-21.
    Hume’s distinction between the calm and violent passions is one whose boundaries are not entirely clear. However, it is crucial to understanding his motivational theory and to identifying an unusual virtue he calls “strength of mind,” the motivational prevalence of the calm passions over the violent. In this paper, I investigate the boundaries of the calm passions and consider the constitution of strength of mind and why Hume regards it as an admirable trait. These are provocative issues for two reasons. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. added 2015-07-08
    What's Wrong with Monkish Virtues? Hume on the Standard of Virtue.Philip A. Reed - 2012 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (1).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13. added 2015-06-09
    “To Have Lived From the Beginning of the World”: Hume on Historical Anatomy and the Lessons of Virtue.Timothy Costelloe - 2007 - Modern Schoolman 84 (4):313-336.
  14. added 2015-06-07
    Modern Greatness of Soul in Hume and Smith.Andrew J. Corsa - 2015 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2.
    I contend that Adam Smith and David Hume offer re-interpretations of Aristotle’s notion of greatness of soul, focusing on the kind of magnanimity Aristotle attributes to Socrates. Someone with Socratic magnanimity is worthy of honor, responds moderately to fortune, and is virtuous—just and benevolent. Recent theorists err in claiming that magnanimity is less important to Hume’s account of human excellence than benevolence. In fact, benevolence is a necessary ingredient for the best sort of greatness. Smith’s “Letter to Strahan” attributes this (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. added 2015-06-06
    Hume and the Enthusiasm Puzzle.James Brian Coleman - 2012 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 10 (2):221-235.
    This paper presents a discussion of an apparent inconsistency between Hume's moral theory and his moral evaluations of historical characters in his History of England. While Hume considers enthusiasm to be a religious vice, he praises the characters of some historical enthusiasts, blames others, and regards enthusiasm as having a positive social effect. But according to Hume's moral theory, only a virtue can have positive social effect, or be praiseworthy. The paper refers to the inconsistency between the History and the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. added 2015-05-29
    The Virtue of Justice Morality: Two Interpretations of Honesty in Hume.Juan Samuel Santos Castro - 2008 - Universitas Philosophica 25 (51).
    Hume's problematic motivation of the virtue of justice is interpreted at least in three different ways: as an interested willingness, as a useful but self-indulgent willingness, finally, as a moral, deliberate and pleasant willingness where concern for the good of others or the society is intentionally expressed. This essay holds the last one of these readings and aims to reveal how it better fits the common sense view of any virtue.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. added 2015-03-03
    Hume's Noble Lie: An Account of His Artificial Virtues.Marcia Baron - 1982 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):539 - 555.
  18. added 2015-03-02
    Artificial Virtues and the Equally Sensible Non-Knaves: A Response to Gauthier.Annette C. Baier - 1992 - Hume Studies 18 (2):429-439.
  19. added 2015-02-22
    Hume's Excellent Hypocrites.Annette C. Baier - 2007 - In E. Mazza & Ronchetti (eds.), Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia. Francoangeli. pp. 267-286.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. added 2015-02-22
    MacIntrye on Hume.Annette Baier - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (1):159 - 163.
  21. added 2015-02-13
    Defending Humility: A Philosophical Sketch with Replies to Tara Smith and David Hume.Michael W. Austin - 2012 - Philosophia Christi 14 (2):461-472.
  22. added 2015-01-27
    Character Traits and the Humean Approach to Ethics.Donald Ainslie - 2007 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 94 (1):79-110.
  23. added 2015-01-15
    Hume and the Intellectual Virtues.Dan O'Brien - 2012 - Discipline Filosofiche 22 (2):153-172.
    For Hume virtues are character traits that are useful and agreeable to ourselves and to others. Such traits are wide-ranging, from moral virtues such as benevolence to intellectual virtues such as courage of mind and penetration. This paper focuses on Hume’s account of the latter. I argue that Hume is a virtue epistemologist, principally interested in the role that intellectual character traits play in social interactions rather than in the justifiedness of particular beliefs. I shall argue that this interpretation is (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. added 2015-01-15
    La historicidad de las virtudes en el pensamiento de David Hume.Gerardo López Sastre - 2005 - In Gerardo López Sastre (ed.), David Hume: Nuevas Perspectivas Sobre Su Obra. Ediciones de la Universidad de Castilla-la Mancha.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. added 2015-01-15
    Hume's Wide View of the Virtues: An Analysis of His Early Critics.James Fieser - 1998 - Hume Studies 24 (2):295-311.
  26. added 2015-01-14
    Hume and the Virtues.Dan O'Brien - 2012 - In Alan Bailey & Dan O'Brien (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Hume. Continuum. pp. 288--302.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations