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  1. added 2019-01-31
    Being Funny: Ontology is a Queer Subject.Bill Martin - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):137-150.
    A Zen Maoist koan: Bill is developing a crazy synthesis that brings together Buddhism, Maoism, and French Marxism, especially Badiou. Running through all three are themes concerning emptiness, letting go, and contingency. On the other hand, when Bill's mind runs toward just making up stuff that seems funny to him, it is hard for him to stop. This “essay” is a meeting point between these two activities, and at some point in the underdetermined, contingent future there will have to be (...)
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  2. added 2019-01-31
    Go Bleep Yourself!: Why Censorship is Funny.Robert T. Valgenti - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):103-114.
    This essay argues that the use of the censor's bleep for comedic effect in cases when an actual expletive is not present can contribute not only to our understanding of traditional theories of humor but also uncover a deep connection between censorship, humor, and human speech. The essay begins with a description of the phenomenon of “unnecessary censorship” within the context of prime-time television and the growing use of profane and indecent language. To understand why unnecessary censorship works as a (...)
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  3. added 2019-01-30
    WHY SO SERIOUS?: On Philosophy and Comedy.Russell Ford - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):1-11.
    The Western philosophical tradition shows a marked fondness for tragedy. From Plato and Aristotle, through German idealism, to contemporary reflections on the murderous violence of the twentieth century, philosophy has often looked to tragedy for resources to make suffering, grief, and death thinkable. But what if, in showing this preference, philosophical thought has unwittingly and unknowingly aligned itself with a form of thinking that accepts injustice without protest? What if tragedy, and the philosophical thinking that mobilizes it, gives a tacit (...)
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  4. added 2019-01-30
    Humor, Law, and Jurisprudence: On Deleuze's Political Philosophy.Russell Ford - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):89-102.
    Dramatization and comedy are recurring themes in Deleuze's work in the 1960′s and, from his book on Nietzsche in 1962 through The Logic of Sense in 1969, remarks on humor and comedy are closely bound to ethical and political concerns. In Nietzsche and Philosophy, he speaks of the “true” and “false” senses of the tragic in order to frame his interpretation of Nietzsche as a whole, but the distinction acquires its immediate importance from its bearing on the question, “what is (...)
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  5. added 2018-08-07
    A Definition of Satire.Dieter Declercq - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (3):319-330.
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  6. added 2018-07-29
    Funny Punny Logic.Alan Roberts - 2017 - Dialectica 71 (4):531-539.
    Humour has been a surprisingly neglected topic in philosophy. However, Noah Greenstein has recently given an intuitive schema for modelling the logical structure of puns. Having this logical structure is indeed what makes a pun punny, but I argue that it is not what makes a pun funny. In order for a pun to be funny, the components comprising its logical structure must be related to one another such that certain conditions are satisfied. By using Graeme Ritchie's linguistic model of (...)
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  7. added 2018-06-28
    Humor, Contempt, and the Exemption From Sense.Bryan Lueck - forthcoming - Philosophy Today.
    Building on the theory of humor advanced by Yves Cusset in his recent book Rire: Tractatus philo-comicus, I argue that we can understand the phenomenon in terms of what Jean-Luc Nancy, following Roland Barthes, has called the exemption from sense. I attempt to show how the humorous sensibility, understood in this way, is entirely incompatible with the experience of others as contemptible. I conclude by developing some of the normative implications of this, focusing specifically on the question whether it is (...)
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  8. added 2018-06-18
    Nietzsche on Mirth and Morality.Trip Glazer - 2017 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 34 (1):79-97.
    Beginning in The Gay Science, Nietzsche repeatedly exhorts his readers to laugh. But why? I argue that Nietzsche wants us to laugh because the emotion that laughter expresses, mirth, plays an important psychological-cum-epistemological role in his attack on traditional morality. I contend that Nietzsche views mirth as an attitude that is uniquely suited to rooting out beliefs that have covertly infiltrated our psychologies. And given that Nietzsche considers morality to be insidious, or to maintain its hold over us even after (...)
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  9. added 2018-06-03
    The Phenomenological Function of Humor in Advance.Jennifer Marra - forthcoming - Idealistic Studies.
    In this paper, I seek to explore the increasing popular claim that the performance of philosophy and the performance of humor share similar features. I argue that the explanation lies in the function of humor—a function which can be a catalyst for philosophy. Following Ernst Cassirer’s philosophy of symbolic forms and utilizing insights from various philosophical and scientific perspectives on the nature and origins of humor, I argue that the function of humor is to reveal faulty belief or error in (...)
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  10. added 2018-05-10
    Comedy and Tragedy as Two Sides of the Same Coin: Reversal and Incongruity as Sources of Insight.Eva Dadlez & Daniel Lüthi - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 52 (2):81.
    In Umberto Eco’s classic novel The Name of the Rose, we are introduced to a decidedly Platonic fear of laughter. According to the blind librarian Jorge de Burgos, “[l]aughter is weakness, corruption, the foolishness of our flesh. It is the peasant’s entertainment, the drunkard’s license;... laughter remains base, a defense for the simple, a mystery desecrated for the plebeians.”1 Laughter could not accompany insight or clarity or revelation. By destroying the last known copy of the second part of Aristotle’s Poetics, (...)
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  11. added 2018-05-08
    Senses of Humor as Political Virtues.Phillip Deen - 2018 - Metaphilosophy 49 (3):371-387.
    This article discusses whether a sense of humor is a political virtue. It argues that a sense of humor is conducive to the central political virtues. We must first, however, delineate different types of humor (benevolent or malicious) and the different political virtues (sociability, prudence, and justice) to which they correspond. Generally speaking, a sense of humor is politically virtuous when it encourages good will toward fellow citizens, an awareness of the limits of power, and a tendency not to take (...)
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  12. added 2018-04-21
    The Inhumanity of Cards Against Humanity.Samuel Director - 2018 - Think 17 (48):39-50.
    In general, it is morally wrong to joke about the suffering of a category of people while in front of a person who fits into this category. I argue that, when people play the game Cards Against Humanity, it is likely that they do this very action. Thus, I conclude that it is morally wrong to play Cards Against Humanity. -/- .
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  13. added 2018-02-28
    Lisa Perfetti, Women and Laughter in Medieval Comic Literature. Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, 2003. Pp. Xiii, 286; 2 Black-and-White Figures. $57.50. [REVIEW]Caroline Jewers - 2006 - Speculum 81 (2):581-583.
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  14. added 2018-02-17
    How Do You Know If You Haven’T Tried It?: Aristotelian Reflections on Hateful Humor.Joshua Schulz - 2013 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 87:295-305.
    Howard Curzer argues that Aristotle’s virtue of wit is a social virtue, a form of philia: conversation with a witty person is pleasing rather than offensive or hateful. On the basis of an analogy between wit and temperance, Curzer holds that the witty person is good at detecting (and avoiding) hateful humor but is not necessarily an expert in judging the funniness of jokes. Curzer thus defends a moderate position in contemporary philosophy of humor—a Detraction Account of hateful humor—arguing that (...)
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  15. added 2018-01-17
    The Promiscuous Poetics Of the Comic.Jagannath Basu - manuscript
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  16. added 2018-01-17
    Jokes and Their Relation to Social Reality.Anton C. Zijderveld - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  17. added 2018-01-17
    The Funny Bone.Social Calendar - forthcoming - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology.
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  18. added 2018-01-17
    Plato and the Spectacle of Laughter.Michael Naas - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):13-26.
    This essay examines the critical role played by comedy and laughter in Plato. It begins by taking seriously Plato's critique of comedy and his concerns about the negative effects of laughter in dialogues such as Republic and Laws. It then shows how Plato, rather than simply rejecting comedy and censuring laughter, attempts to put these into the service of philosophy by rethinking them in philosophical terms. Accordingly, the laughable or the ridiculous is understood not just in relation to the ugly (...)
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  19. added 2018-01-17
    Laughter’s Influence on the Intimacy of Self-Disclosure.Alan W. Gray, Brian Parkinson & Robin I. Dunbar - 2015 - Human Nature 26 (1):28-43.
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  20. added 2018-01-17
    Humour: A Very Short Introduction.Noël Carroll - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Humour is a universal feature of human life. In this Very Short Introduction Noel Carroll considers the nature and value of humour, from its leading theories and its relation to emotion and cognition, to ethical questions of its morality and its significance in shaping society.
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  21. added 2018-01-17
    Eluding the Void: Art and Humour as Anodynes for Witkiewicz, Beckett and Faulkner.J. Greg Perkins - 2013 - Estetyka I Krytyka 31:237-248.
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  22. added 2018-01-17
    Listening to Many Voices: Athenian Tragedy as Popular Art.William Allan & Adrian Kelly - 2013 - In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity. Oxford University Press. pp. 77.
    By analysing how the audience interpreted the many voices of tragic performance, this chapter suggests a new model for understanding tragedy’s relationship to the world of the watching community. Although the idea that the poet expresses his personal opinions through the chorus or his characters is now rightly seen as old-fashioned and naïve, it is still legitimate to ask how the poet uses his heroic characters and their voices to speak to his contemporary audience—using ‘speak to’ in the broadest sense, (...)
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  23. added 2018-01-17
    On Laughter and Other Sacrifices.Natalie Strobach - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (2):77 - 89.
    (2013). ON LAUGHTER AND OTHER SACRIFICES. Angelaki: Vol. 18, No. 2, pp. 77-89.
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  24. added 2018-01-17
    On Morreall: A Failure to Distinguish Between Play and Humor. [REVIEW]Robin Tapley - 2013 - Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (1-2):147-162.
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  25. added 2018-01-17
    Comic Book Princesses for Grown-Ups: Cinderella Meets the Pages of the Superhero.Rebecca-Anne C. Do Rozario - 2012 - Colloquy 24.
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  26. added 2018-01-17
    Funny Words in Plautine Comedy (Review).Alison Sharrock - 2011 - American Journal of Philology 132 (3):510-513.
    It is a well-known fact that anyone addicted to jokes based on wordplay deserves to be punished. My mathematician father was such a one. A mathematician friend of his, never previously known to display any signs of possessing a sense of humor, once wholly redeemed himself in the eyes of my revered parent by telling how, on a recent trip to China, he had been reminded of his colleague when seeing a sign giving a shop owner's name: Yu Pun Wong. (...)
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  27. added 2018-01-17
    Truly Funny: Humor, Irony, and Satire as Moral Criticism.E. M. Dadlez - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):1.
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  28. added 2018-01-17
    El Cómic Español Desde 1995.Juan Manuel Díaz de Guereñu - 2011 - Arbor 187 (Extra_2):209-220.
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  29. added 2018-01-17
    Quit Your Kvetching: The Humor of Woody Allen.Alan Soble - 2011 - Essays in Philosophy 12 (2):10.
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  30. added 2018-01-17
    Reseña de "Hegel, pensador de la actualidad. Ensayos sobre la fenomenología Del espíritu Y otros textos" de Vanessa Lemm Y Juan ormeño karzulovic (eds.).Jorge Rendón Alarcón - 2011 - Signos Filosóficos 13 (26):171-175.
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  31. added 2018-01-17
    Materialist Apocalypticism: The Comic-Ethical Vision of Nathanael West.Mark David Wright - 2010 - Dissertation, The Claremont Graduate University
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  32. added 2018-01-17
    Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor. [REVIEW]John Marmysz - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):305-308.
    A review of John Morrreall's book Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor.
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  33. added 2018-01-17
    Sublime Comedy: On the Inhuman Rights of Clowns.Joshua Delpech-Ramey - 2010 - Substance 39 (2):131-141.
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  34. added 2018-01-17
    Greek Laughter: A Study of Cultural Psychology From Homer to Early Christianity (Review).Charles Platter - 2010 - American Journal of Philology 131 (3):529-532.
    In 1991, Stephen Halliwell published "The Uses of Laughter in Greek Culture" , an essay that, among other things, rejected totalizing definitions of laughter and the laughable in favor of a more nuanced view that emphasized a distinction between laughter perceived as friendly and non-consequential, i.e., not injurious to the reputation of anyone, and laughter seen as abusive, hostile, or belittling, and so deleterious to the reputation of the target. His point was not that laughter could be classified so easily (...)
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  35. added 2018-01-17
    Language : Lies, Laughter & Evolution.Patrick Jemmer - unknown
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  36. added 2018-01-17
    A Source Book of Literary and Philosophical Writings About Humour and Laughter: The Seventy-Five Essential Texts From Antiquity to Modern Times.Jorge Figueroa-Dorrego & Cristina Larkin-Galinanes (eds.) - 2009 - The Edwin Mellen Press.
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  37. added 2018-01-17
    Preliminary Notes on the Sequential Organization of Smile and Laughter.Hiromichi Hosoma - 2009 - In Hattori (ed.), New Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence. Springer. pp. 288--293.
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  38. added 2018-01-17
    Comedy Incarnate: Buster Keaton, Physical Humor, and Bodily Coping.NoË Carroll & L. - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
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  39. added 2018-01-17
    You Can See the Funny Side, Can't You? Pupil Humour with the Teacher as Target.Wil Meeus & Paul Mahieu - 2009 - Educational Studies 35 (5):553-560.
    Pupils' humour aimed at teachers is all too often seen as baiting or misbehaviour. Suspecting that this was probably not the case, we took a sample. Looked at from the perspective of the intention behind the humour, it appears that pupils' humour directed at teachers makes a predominantly positive contribution to the relationship between pupil and teacher.
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  40. added 2018-01-17
    Seriously Funny, or Beethoven as Humorist.Ian Wyatt Gerg - 2009 - Semiotics:153-161.
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  41. added 2018-01-17
    ‘Having a Laugh’: Masculinities, Health and Humour.Robert Williams - 2009 - Nursing Inquiry 16 (1):74-81.
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  42. added 2018-01-17
    Abysmal Laughter.Stuart Grant - 2008 - PhaenEx 3 (2):37-70.
    Between March and June 2008, a group of fifteen Performance Studies and Communications students at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia undertook a course on comedy based on a series of six lectures by Agnes Heller in which she outlined ideas from her book, Immortal Comedy. Subsequently, the students attended a number of comedy shows and other events to perform practical group phenomenological research with an aim to activate the ground opened by Heller’s theories through description of actual comic phenomena. The (...)
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  43. added 2018-01-17
    Introduction to Special Issue on Humour: A Modest Attempt at Presenting Contemporary Linguistic Approaches to Humour Studies.Marta Dynel - 2008 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 4 (1):1-12.
    Introduction to Special Issue on Humour: A Modest Attempt at Presenting Contemporary Linguistic Approaches to Humour Studies.
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  44. added 2018-01-17
    The "Dark Side" of Humour. An Analysis of Subversive Humour in Workplace Emails.Charley Rowe & Stephanie Schnurr - 2008 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 4 (1):109-130.
    The "Dark Side" of Humour. An Analysis of Subversive Humour in Workplace Emails Although a substantial amount of research has investigated the various functions of humour in a workplace context, electronic means of communication have largely been ignored. This is particularly surprising since electronic communication in the workplace is increasingly gaining significance. This seems to be especially true for email, which in many workplaces is the preferred medium for communicating transactional as well as relational topics. Drawing on a corpus of (...)
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  45. added 2018-01-17
    Tragedy, Comedy and Humor in the Psychoanalysis.Carmen Elisa Escobar María - 2008 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 8:136-158.
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  46. added 2018-01-17
    Comedy Incarnate: Buster Keaton, Physical Humor, and Bodily Coping.NoË Carroll & L. - 2008 - Wiley-Blackwell.
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  47. added 2018-01-17
    Funny Games.Cecilia García - 2008 - Critica 58 (955):92.
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  48. added 2018-01-17
    The Value of Humor.Robin Tapley - 2006 - Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (4):421-431.
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  49. added 2018-01-17
    Richard Pryor, the Philosopher of Laughter.Scott McLemee - 2006 - The Philosophers' Magazine 34:14-14.
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  50. added 2018-01-17
    Risus Mediaevalis: Laughter in Medieval Literature and Art. Herman Braet, Guido Latré, Werner Verbeke.F. R. P. Akehurst - 2005 - Speculum 80 (2):528-530.
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1 — 50 / 701