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  1. Deconstructive Turn in Transcendental Thinking.Ilyina Anna - 2015 - Sententiae 33 (2):125-148.
    The paper addresses the problem of the place of deconstruction in the history of transcendental philosophy. J. Derrida’s project is considered as one of the most representative and consistent realizations of theoretical foundations of transcendentalism along with prominent conceptions such as Kant’s critique and Husserl’s phenomenology. The author suggests a number of attributes of transcendental thinking that allow historical reconstruction of the transcendental paradigm. Derridian approach is considered as a turn towards this tradition, conceived as a transcendental tradition par exellence, (...)
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  2. Deconstruction and the Transformation of Husserlian Phenomenology.Chung Chin-Yi - 2008 - Kritike 2 (2):77-94.
    In this paper I will examine Husserl’s attempt to establish a ground for science with the so called transcendental reduction. This will entail both an identification of the problems that Husserl was attempting to solve as well as a careful analysis of Husserl’s account of his methodology. I will then examine how Derrida’s reading, which affirms the phenomenological project in many of its essential aspects, begins to signal a subtle yet ultimately radical disagreement. This disagreement will have lasting implications for (...)
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  3. Derrida’s 1962–63 Sorbonne Courses on Metaphysics and Phenomenology.Françoise Dastur - 2016 - Research in Phenomenology 46 (2):297-307.
    _ Source: _Volume 46, Issue 2, pp 297 - 307 In 1962–62, Derrida presented two series of lectures at the Sorbonne, the first of which was entitled “Method and Metaphysics,” and the second “Phenomenology, Theology and Teleology in Husserl.” The author was present as a student at these lectures, and presents below a summary of their contents.
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  4. From Ideality to Historicity, What Happens?Juan Manuel Garrido - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):949-973.
    The problem of the origin of geometry is crucial for understanding the formation and development of Derrida’s early conception of historicity. Mathematical idealities offer the most powerful example of meanings that are fully transmissible through history. Against Husserl’s explanation of the particular, Derrida considers that the logic and progression of mathematical idealities can only be explained if they are referred to non-intentional and pre-subjective movements of production and development of significations: language itself, which is structured as non-phonetic writing. Historicity is, (...)
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  5. Telepathy and Intersubjectivity in Derrida, Husserl and Levinas.Michael Haworth - 2014 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 45 (3):254-267.
    Taking as its jumping off point recent attempts in the sciences of the mind to facilitate direct brain-to-brain communication, this article considers the challenges such a development poses to the phenomenology of intersubjectivity. This is examined initially through recourse to Husserl's description of the encounter with the other in the Cartesian Meditations, Levinas’ rival account in Totality and Infinity, and Derrida's contribution to this dialogue in the essay ‘Violence and Metaphysics’. All three turn around the problem of how the externality (...)
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  6. Modernity and Intentional History: Edmund Husserl, Jacob Klein, and Jacques Derrida.Joshua Kates - 2005 - Philosophy Today 49 (Supplement):193-203.
  7. Material Phenomenology to the Test of Deconstruction: Michel Henry and Derrida.Sébastien Laoureux - 2009 - Studia Phaenomenologica 9:237-246.
    What would be the result of reading Derrida from the standpoint of material phenomenology? And what would be the result of reading material phenomenology on the basis of the requirements of Derridean thought? These are the questions that this article endeavours to tackle by focusing on the two philosophers’ readings of Husserl’s Lectures on the Consciousness of Internal Time. At first strangely similar, these two readings soon display marked differences. Whereas Derrida, in his approach, is keen to demonstrate that there (...)
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  8. Dire et penser “je”: la vacuité de la présence à soi du sujet de Husserl à Derrida.Pierre-Jean Renaudie - 2016 - Discipline Filosofiche (1):69-92.
    According to Jacques Derrida, the tradition of metaphysics is dominated by a basic distinction between presence and absence that plays a fundamental role in Husserl’s theory of meaning and contaminates the core of his phenomenological project. If Husserl’s distinction between indication and expression in the 1st Logical Investigation is credited for opening a ‘phenomenological breakthrough’, his account of the entwinement between the indicative and expressive functions of linguistic signs is accused of restoring and maintaining the metaphysical primacy of presence. In (...)
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  9. Making Sense of the Lived Body and the Lived World: Meaning and Presence in Husserl, Derrida and Noë.Jacob Martin Rump - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):141-167.
    I argue that Husserl’s transcendental account of the role of the lived body in sense-making is a precursor to Alva Noë’s recent work on the enactive, embodied mind, specifically his notion of “sensorimotor knowledge” as a form of embodied sense-making that avoids representationalism and intellectualism. Derrida’s deconstructive account of meaning—developed largely through a critique of Husserl—relies on the claim that meaning is structured through the complication of the “interiority” of consciousness by an “outside,” and thus might be thought to lend (...)
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  10. Derrida, Husserl and the Problem of Prior Sense.Ralph Shain - 2016 - Cosmos and History 12 (1):292-308.
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  11. The Idea of Open in the Thought of Jacques Derrida.Mengxue Wu - manuscript
    Abstract: This Thesis is to examine Jacques Derrida’s idea of trace, différance, and supplement; to examine whether or not they have a structure of open. By closely reading Derrida’s Speech and Phenomena, “Violence and Metaphysics”, Of Grammatology, and “Différance,” I will discuss this question in two levels of inquiry: one is on the microscopic scope and the other one is on the large-scale scope. In the microscopic scope, Derrida’s trace, différance, and supplement can be regarded as open, because trace, différance, (...)
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