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Summary

Husserl distinguishes between the human body, as experienced from a first-person perspective (Leib, rendered in English as “the Body” or “lived body”), and the human body, as it is experienced from a third-person, especially from a scientific, perspective (Körper). The Body plays important roles in his discussions of self-awareness, other-awareness, and perceptual experience. Thus, the Body, with its kinaesthetic systems, shapes the ways in which I can come into perceptual contact with objects, or the “horizons” in terms of which objects are given to me (See Husserl: Horizonality.). In the experience of encountering the other, the constitutive empathy could not set to work, were it not for the other’s embodiment, enabling one to experience the relevant similarities and differences between oneself and the other. Also, the Husserlian ego is not to be regarded as akin to a Cartesian mental substance, but is constituted as embodied. This accounts not only for our perceptual abilities, but also for our capacity to will and act. Thus, our experiences have passive and active aspects, and these are interwoven in complex ways.  

Key works

Gallagher 1986 rejects the Husserlian view that there are “hyletic data” (or sensations), and develops a Merleau-Pontyan account of perception, based on the notion of the lived body. Countering the view that embodiment was only first thematized by Merleau-Ponty and the other later phenomenologists, Zahavi 1994 argues that Husserl systematically integrated this topic into his transcendental phenomenology. Mensch 2000 regards Husserl’s discussions of embodiment as unified by the idea that “presence and embodiment imply each other”, and discusses a number of topics from the point of view of an embodied, “postfoundational” philosophy. Dodd 1997, too,  argues that the problem of the body is of central importance for Husserl’s transcendental idealism, and that it eventually provides the key to understanding human beings as “spiritual”. Lotz 2007 discusses the lived body as rendering possible various forms of “affection”, thereby facilitating one’s commerce with the environment, as well as one’s relationships with other subjects. Based on Bernhard Waldenfels’ university lectures, Waldenfels 2000 offers thorough discussions of different aspects of embodied subjectivity. Behnke 1996 puts forward a program for the study of the lived body.

Introductions Zahavi 2002, Ch. 3, Moran 2005, Ch. 7
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241 found
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  1. Husserl's Challenge to Merleau-Ponty's Embodied Intersubjectivity.Joshua Soffer - manuscript
    In this paper, I show how Husserl, via the method of the epoche, dissolves Merleau-Ponty’s starting point in the gestalt structuralism of primary corporeal intersubjectivity, revealing a more radically temporal foundation that has nothing of gestalt form in it. Whereas for Merleau-Ponty, the dependency of the parts belonging to a whole is a presupposed unity, for Husserl, a whole instantiates a temporal story unfolding each of its parts out of the others associatively-synthetically as the furthering of a continuous progression or (...)
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  2. Time as Relevance: Gendlin's Phenomenology of Radical Temporality.Joshua Soffer Soffer - manuscript
    In this paper, I discuss Eugene Gendlin’s contribution to radically temporal discourse , situating it in relation to Husserl and Heidegger’s analyses of time, and contrasting it with a range of interlinked approaches in philosophy and psychology that draw inspiration from, but fall short in their interpretation of the phenomenological work of Husserl and Heidegger. Gendlin reveals the shortcomings of these approaches with regard to the understanding of the relation between affect, motivation and intention, attention , reflective and pre-reflective self-consciousness, (...)
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  3. Husserl’s Theory of Bodily Expressivity and its Revision: In View of the “1914 Texts”.Zhida Luo - forthcoming - Tandf: Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology:1-17.
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  4. Husserl on Minimal Mind and the Origins of Consciousness in the Natural World.Bence Peter Marosan - forthcoming - Husserl Studies:1-21.
    The main aim of this article is to offer a systematic reconstruction of Husserl’s theory of minimal mind and his ideas pertaining to the lowest level of consciousness in living beings. In this context, the term ‘minimal mind’ refers to the mental sphere and capacities of the simplest conceivable subject. This topic is of significant contemporary interest for philosophy of mind and empirical research into the origins of consciousness. I contend that Husserl’s reflections on minimal mind offer a fruitful contribution (...)
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  5. Volitional causality vs natural causality: reflections on their compatibility in Husserl’s phenomenology of action.Nicola Spano - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-19.
    In the present article, I introduce Husserl’s analyses of ‘natural causality’ and ‘volitional causality’, which are collected in the volume ‘Wille und Handlung’ of the Husserliana edition Studien zur Struktur des Bewußtseins. My aim is to show that Husserl’s insight into these phenomena enables us to understand more clearly both the specificity of, and the relation between, the motivational nexus belonging to the sphere of the will in contrast with the causal laws of nature. In light of this understanding, in (...)
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  6. A Husserlian Contribution: Concerning Intentional Movement and Understanding in Sporting Activities.Freja Balslev Heath & Signe Højbjerre Larsen - 2022 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 49 (1):99-116.
    This article contributes to an ongoing discussion within sports philosophy concerning how to understand intentional movement in sporting activities. The operations of ‘representation intentionality...
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  7. The Husserlian Will to Power: ‘I Can Do Whatever I Want’.Sara Pasetto - 2022 - Human Studies 45 (1):93-118.
    It is common to experience hostile emotions like frustration, anger and hate in our everyday life. It could be sufficient a mere hindrance obstructing the pursuit of our goals to lead us thinking and justifying alternative actions to our original aim, in a manner that can redirect us to obtaining a disvalue, instead of realising the purpose of good will of our initial intention. Normally, we are unaware of this shift because the emotional process is the only perceived phenomenon. This (...)
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  8. The Body and Embodiment: A Philosophical Guide.Frank Chouraqui - 2021 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Perfect for use at advanced undergraduate and graduate level, this is the first text to offer students a unified narrative regarding the place of the body in Western thinking. The body is simultaneously active and passive, powerful and vulnerable and as such, it fundamentally informs ontological, political, ethical and epistemological issues.
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  9. Hábitos, Carácter y Personalidad En Husserl.Urbano Ferrer Santos - 2021 - Investigaciones Fenomenológicas 6:119.
    Los hábitos tienen en Husserl un sentido pasivo, derivado de la sedimentación de los actos, y un sentido activo, que unifica las distintas voliciones. En este sentido activo, la individualidad de la persona se manifiesta en el carácter y en las actitudes personales. Para aprehender los rasgos de la personalidad hay que abandonar la actitud científico-natural, por cuanto la unidad de la persona se presenta fenomenólogicamente de modo heterogéneo a la unidad de las cosas físicas. Desde la actitud personalista se (...)
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  10. ¿En Qué Sentido Mi Cuerpo Es Mío? El “Cuerpo Propio” En Ideen II Y Phénoménologie de la Perception.Esteban A. García - 2021 - Investigaciones Fenomenológicas 15:21.
    El artículo confronta el análisis merleau-pontiano de los cuatro caracteres del “cuerpo propio” en Phénoménologie de la Perception con el tratamiento original que Husserl realizó de los mismos puntos en Ideen II. Se examinan sus respectivos análisis de la permanencia absoluta, las sensaciones dobles, las cenestesias y las cinestesias para determinar el diferente significado que comporta el “cuerpo propio” para cada autor. Se observa así que las “ubiestesias” no desempeñan para Merleau-Ponty el rol constitutivo del cuerpo propio que tienen para (...)
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  11. Revisiting Husserl’s Concept of Leib Using Merleau‐Ponty’s Ontology.Jan Halák - 2021 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 59 (3):309-341.
    This article reconsiders Husserl’s concept of Leib in light of Merleau‐Ponty’s interpretation of the human body as an ontologically significant phenomenon. I first analyze Husserl’s account of the body as a “two‐fold unity” and demonstrate the problematic nature of its four implications, namely, the ambiguous ontological status of the body as subject‐object, the view of “my body” as “my object,” the preconstitutive character of the unity of the body, and the restriction of the constitution of the body to touch alone. (...)
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  12. Husserl on Epistemic Agency.Hanne Jacobs - 2021 - In The Husserlian Mind. pp. 340-351.
    In this chapter I aim to show that Husserl’s descriptions of the nature and role of activity in the epistemic economy of our conscious lives imply a nondeflationary account of epistemic agency. After providing the main outlines of this account, I discuss how it compares to contemporary accounts of epistemic agency and respond to some potential objections. In concluding I indicate that according to this Husserlian account of epistemic agency we can be said to be intrinsically responsible for holding the (...)
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  13. Leib Y Tecnologías: Relaciones Y Co-Fundación.Nicola Liberati - 2021 - Investigaciones Fenomenológicas 11:165.
    El objetivo de este trabajo es estudiar la relación y la co-fundación entre el cuerpo viviente [Leib] y la tecnología desde una perspectiva Husserliana. Quisiera afirmar la necesidad de abandonar el concepto clásico del Leib como un ser desnudo y natural, constituyéndose a sí mismo por sus características biológicas. Estudiando la acción de la tecnología, en primer lugar como una mera extensión y después como una incorporación, la relación cofundacional entre la tecnología y el Leib se hará evidente. Sin embargo, (...)
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  14. The Genesis of Action in Husserl’s Studien Zur Struktur des Bewusstseins.Nicola Spano - 2021 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 53 (2):118-132.
    In the present article, I discuss Husserl’s analysis of the genesis of action in the Husserliana edition Studien zur Struktur des Bewusstseins. My aim is to clarify how a “voluntary action” has its...
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  15. Husserl. Cuerpo Propio Y Alienación.Marcela Venebra Muñoz - 2021 - Investigaciones Fenomenológicas 15:109.
    En este artículo intento aclarar qué significa la distinción yo / cuerpo, en el contexto de los análisis de la constitución de Ideas II. Me interesa el énfasis husserliano en la dimensión constituida del cuerpo propio, del cuerpo como «haber» del yo en que desembocan las descripciones del cuerpo vivido. Esta posesión señala una condición antropológica fundamental y entraña la posibilidad de su enajenación o no reconocimiento. En un primer momento describo la esfera vivida del cuerpo propio, su condición animal (...)
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  16. The Forgotten Phenomenology: “Enactive Perception” in the Eyes of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty.Roi Bar - 2020 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 28 (1):53-72.
    Phenomenology is not dead yet, at least not from the viewpoint of the “phenomenology-friendly”approach to the mind that has recently emerged in cognitive science: the “enactive approach” or “enactivism.” This approach takes the mental capacities, such as perception, consciousness and cognition, to be the result of the interaction between the brain, the body and the environment. In this, it offers an alternative to reductionist explanations of the mental in terms of brain activities, like cognitivism, especially computationalism, while overcoming the Cartesian (...)
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  17. Husserl and Merleau Ponty: The Affective Bodily Experience of Architectural Space.Irene Breuer - 2020 - Gestalt Theory 42 (3):287-302.
    Summary This paper deals with the development of Husserl’s and Merleau-Pontys analyses of the affective lived experience of body and space. Both the concept of „flesh“ and „Hyle“ stand for a sensuous principle that underlies the original givenness and solidarity of body and world and I claim that this interaction and the concomitant intertwining of body and place make up the existential dimension of architecture, i.e. the, being-here-in-a-place’. In this connection, I argue that the fact that bodily affective experience endows (...)
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  18. Correction To: Bar, Roi. The Forgotten Phenomenology: “Enactive Perception” in the Eyes of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty.Scott Davidson - 2020 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 28 (1).
    A correction has been made to: Bar, Roi. The Forgotten Phenomenology: “Enactive Perception” in the Eyes of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy, v. 28, n. 1, p. 53-72, june 2020.The incorrect abstract was included with the original publication of DOI 10.5195/jffp.2020.928The original article has been updated to reflect this change.
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  19. The Embodied Self and the Paradox of Subjectivity.Christoph Durt - 2020 - Husserl Studies 36 (1):69-85.
    While it seems obvious that the embodied self is both a subject of experience and an object in the world, it is not clear how, or even whether, both of these senses of self can refer to the same self. According to Husserl, the relation between these two senses of self is beset by the “paradox of human subjectivity.” Following Husserl’s lead, scholars have attempted to resolve the paradox of subjectivity. This paper categorizes the different formulations of the paradox according (...)
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  20. Génesis Del Nóema: Un Análisis Noemático a Partir de la Constitución Del Cuerpo Adolorido.Alejandro Escudero Morales - 2020 - Revista de Humanidades de Valparaíso 15:65.
    The objective of this work is to carry out a genetic study on the Husserlian concept of noema based in the givenness of the real body in the passive experience of pain. The development focuses, either, on the delimitation of the painful body given in its physical sphere in attention to its material properties, and in the eventual integration of this passively given body in the so-called noetic-noematic structure regarding the intentional revelation that pain implies. To do this, pain will (...)
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  21. Bodily expressions, feelings, and the direct perception account of social cognition.Francesca Forlè - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (5):1019-1034.
    In this paper, I will argue in favor of a direct perception account of social cognition, focusing on the idea that we can directly grasp at least some mental states of others through their bodily expressions. I will investigate the way we should consider expressions and their relations to mental phenomena in order to defend DP. In order to do so, I will present Krueger and Overgaard’s idea of expressions as constitutive proper parts of the mental phenomena expressed and I (...)
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  22. Husserlian Horizons, Cognitive Affordances and Motivating Reasons for Action.Marta Jorba - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences (5):1-22.
    According to Husserl’s phenomenology, the intentional horizon is a general structure of experience. However, its characterisation beyond perceptual experience has not been explored yet. This paper aims, first, to fill this gap by arguing that there is a viable notion of cognitive horizon that presents features that are analogous to features of the perceptual horizon. Secondly, it proposes to characterise a specific structure of the cognitive horizon—that which presents possibilities for action—as a cognitive affordance. Cognitive affordances present cognitive elements as (...)
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  23. Kinesthetic Unity as Motivated Association.Andrea Lanza - 2020 - Gestalt Theory 42 (3):271-286.
    Summary Within Husserl’s theory of perception, the role attributed to kinesthetic sensations determines a phase of the perceptive constitution that marks the boundary between pure receptivity and a first form of self-determination of consciousness. Kinesthetic experiences are, in fact, characterized not just as acts that are performed but rather that can be performed, albeit according to predetermined paths. This primitive form of ‘instinctive’ spontaneity of the Ego as realization of pre-established potentialities, characterizes what Husserl defines the ‘ idiopsychic’ dimension of (...)
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  24. Genesis of the noema: A noematic analysis based on the constitution of the body in pain.Alejandro Escudero Morales - 2020 - Humanities Journal of Valparaiso 15:65-80.
    The objective of this work is to carry out a genetic study on the Husserlian concept of noema based in the givenness of the real body in the passive experience of pain. The development focuses, either, on the delimitation of the painful body given in its physical sphere in attention to its material properties, and in the eventual integration of this passively given body in the so-called noetic-noematic structure regarding the intentional revelation that pain implies. To do this, pain will (...)
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  25. Body and Place as the Noetic-Noematic Structure of Geographical Experience.Stefan W. Schmidt - 2020 - Research in Phenomenology 50 (2):261-281.
    In this paper, I use Husserl’s phenomenological analyses of noesis and noema to investigate the connection between experience and place, a relation which I call “geographical experience,” using a term coined by Edward Relph. Following the correlative structure of lived experience, geographical experience is enabled by the lived body as the noetic part and place as the respective noematic part. Both parts belong together necessarily. However, in this experiential field, distortions and an eluding aspect of place appear in the relationship (...)
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  26. The Body Subject: Being True to the Truths of Experience.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (1):1-29.
    This essay is divided into four sections, the communal aim of which is to provide essential pathways to experiential bodily truths, thereby bringing to light the essential nature of the first-person body, the body subject. The essential pathways are anchored in Husserlian insights concerning the animate nature of the body subject. To arrive at these insights, it is necessary first to clear the field of conceptual obstacles, notably those stemming from idiosyncratic notions of proprioception that fail to accord with the (...)
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  27. Being a body and having a body. The twofold temporality of embodied intentionality.Maren Wehrle - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (3):499-521.
    The body is both the subject and object of intentionality: qua Leib, it experiences worldly things and qua Körper, it is experienced as a thing in the world. This phenomenological differentiation forms the basis for Helmuth Plessner’s anthropological theory of the mediated or eccentric nature of human embodiment, that is, simultaneously we both are a body and have a body. Here, I want to focus on the extent to which this double aspect of embodiment relates to our experience of temporality. (...)
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  28. Cardiophenomenology: A Refinement of Neurophenomenology.Natalie Depraz & Thomas Desmidt - 2019 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 18 (3):493-507.
    Cardiophenomenology aims at refining the neuro-phenomenological approach created by F. Varela as a new paradigm, jointly based on Husserl’s a priori dynamics of the living present and an experiment on anticipatory time-dynamics of visual motor perception. In order to do so, we will situate the paradigm of neurophenomenology at the cardio-vascular level, focusing on the emotional dynamics of lived experience and thus refining the dialogue, more precisely, the generative mutual constraints between first- and third-person analysis. In this article we present (...)
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  29. From the Embodied Self to the Embodied Person.Francesca Forlè - 2019 - Humana Mente 12 (36).
    In this paper, I will focus on the process of constitution of oneself as an embodied being and, more precisely, on the specific way in which one can experience oneself not just as an embodied self, but rather as the actual embodied person he/she is. I will start by describing the most basic way in which our embodied self is constituted, that is as a felt-feeling body and as the zero-point of orientation of all our sensations and perceptions. Then, I (...)
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  30. The Discarnate Madman by Emmanuel Falque.Sarah Horton - 2019 - Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion 1 (1):90–117.
    Translation (French to English) of Emmanuel Falque's "Le fou désincarné." I also wrote a translator's note, placed at the conclusion of the article. Phenomenology must begin to acknowledge the organic, animal nature of the body instead of focusing only on the pure subjectivity of the flesh. Mediating between Descartes's extended body (a mere object that is entirely distinct from the self) and Husserl's lived body (the flesh that is the self), the spread body is the organic body that I have, (...)
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  31. Seeing the Other’s Mind: McDowell and Husserl on Bodily Expressivity and the Problem of Other Minds.Zhida Luo - 2019 - Human Studies 42 (3):371-389.
    McDowell motivates a disjunctive conception of experience in the context of other-minds skepticism, but his conception of other minds has been less frequently discussed. In this paper, I focus on McDowell’s perceptual account of others that emphasizes the primitivity of others’ bodily expressivity and his defense of a common-sense understanding of others. And I suggest that Husserl’s subtle analysis of bodily expressivity not only bears fundamental similarities with McDowell’s but also helps to demonstrate the sense in which McDowell’s emphasis on (...)
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  32. Kinesthesia: An Extended Critical Overview and a Beginning Phenomenology of Learning.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (2):143-169.
    This paper takes five different perspectives on kinesthesia, beginning with its evolution across animate life and its biological distinction from, and relationship to proprioception. It proceeds to document the historical derivation of “the muscle sense,” showing in the process how analytic philosophers bypass the import of kinesthesia by way of “enaction,” for example, and by redefinitions of “tactical deception.” The article then gives prominence to a further occlusion of kinesthesia and its subduction by proprioception, these practices being those of well-known (...)
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  33. Embodying the Non-Dual: A Phenomenological Perspective on Shikantaza.S. Voros - 2019 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 26 (7-8):70-94.
    In this paper, I explore shikantaza, the Soto Zen practice of 'just sitting', through the phenomenological lens of late Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. One of the merits of the phenomenological approach is that it enables us to think of bodies not only as physical-objective, but also experiential-existential structures (Körper vs. Leib, respectively), and thus provides a conceptual framework capable of thematizing the profoundly corporeal dynamics of shikantaza without falling prey to physico-neural reductionism, as is often the case with contemporary (...)
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  34. Embodiment and Self-Awareness – Evans, Cassam and Husserl.Lilian Alweiss - 2018 - Philosophy 93 (1):31-51.
  35. Ideas Toward a Phenomenology of Interruptions.Cameron Bassiri - 2018 - Lexington Books.
    This book analyzes the problem of the relations between time, sleep, and the body in Husserl’s phenomenology. It reconfigures the unity of the life of subjectivity in light of the phenomenon of dreamless sleep, establishes the concept of a fractured subject, and develops a phenomenology of interruptions.
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  36. On the Transformation of the Time-Drenched Body: Kinaesthetic Capability-Consciousness and Recalcitrant Holding Patterns.E. A. Behnke - 2018 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 25 (7-8):89-111.
    Drawing upon Husserlian phenomenological methods and findings throughout, I begin by briefly considering the role of the body in explicit, presentificational memory and in recognizing familiar types of objects and situations, then I review and extend Husserl's account of the formation of bodily memory, focusing on kinaesthetic capability-consciousness as well as addressing bodily 'amnesia'. Finally, I turn to the formation of 'recalcitrant holding patterns' and propose some practical, phenomenologically- inspired strategies that can shift such patterns. In this way the 'time-drenched' (...)
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  37. Flesh and Body: The Phenomenology of Husserl.Hannah Berry - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (3):278-279.
    Volume 50, Issue 3, July 2019, Page 278-279.
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  38. Lived Body and Intentional Embodiment.Jagna Brudzińska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (4):245-259.
    The body, the bodily condition of the human being, or embodiment as an essential aspect of the human situation in the lived world are important topics of phenomenological research and phenomenologically oriented anthropology. On the other hand, today also cognitive research and neurosciences are dealing with the topic of embodiment, mainly focusing on so-called embodied cognition. Modern neuroscience claims that both, thought and action can only be interpreted in the light of interactions between brain, body and environment. New trends in (...)
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  39. Embodiment and Animality.Cristian Ciocan - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (2):87-103.
    The aim of this article is to examine the problematic frontier that separates the phenomenology of the body and the phenomenology of animality. The main difficulty is to differentiate phenomenologically not only between embodiment and animality, but also between specifically human embodied experience and what is accessible to us through empathy in relation to the corporeality of the animal. I will tackle these questions by considering relevant textual material from the writings of Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger. On the one (...)
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  40. La distinzione fenomenologica fra corpo vivo e oggetto corporeo in Husserl e Scheler.The phenomenological distinction between Leib (living body) and Körper (corporeal object) in Scheler and Husserl.Guido Cusinato - 2018 - In Biosemiotic and psychopathology of the ordo amoris. Biosemiotica e psicopatologia dell'ordo amoris. In dialogo con Max Scheler. Milano:
    In this paper, I show that, although Husserl explicitly explains a kinetic theory of Leib already in § 83 of Raum und Ding, a real phenomenology of the distinction between Leib (living body) and Körper (corporeal object) is not conceivable without Scheler's contribution. It’s quite common to search for the origin of this distinction in Ideen II, in a work composed of texts written in different moments from 1912 on. Before 1912 Husserl dedicated himself to the theme of corporeality in (...)
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  41. El concepto de motivación en la fenomenología hermenéutica del joven Heidegger.Rocío Garcés Ferrer - 2018 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 35 (2):439-458.
    This paper deals with the methodological role played by the term «motivation» in young Heidegger’s early hermeneutic transformation of phenomenology. To that effect, I shall start analyzing the concept of motivation in Husserl’s phenomenology so as to better understand its hermeneutical variation in young Heidegger’s philosophy. Subsequently, I will pay special attention to the relevance exhibited by motivation in the emergence of the most important methodological notions of hermeneutical phenomenology as «destruction», «formal indication» and «preconception». To conclude, I shall explore (...)
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  42. The Four Dimensions of Embodiment and the Experience of Illness.Māra Grīnfelde - 2018 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 9 (2):107-127.
    In this paper I will try to systematically lay out and describe the multiple dimensions of the embodied experience of illness, which until recently has been the main focus within the field of the phenomenology of medicine. In order to do this, I will turn to analysis of the nature of embodiment in Husserl’s phenomenology. I will argue that based on Husserl’s phenomenology of the body, one can distinguish four ways of experiencing one’s body, or four dimensions of embodiment. I (...)
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  43. The Concept of ‘Body Schema’ in Merleau-Ponty’s Account of Embodied Subjectivity.Jan Halák - 2018 - In Bernard Andrieu, Jim Parry, Alessandro Porrovecchio & Olivier Sirost (eds.), Body Ecology and Emersive Leisure. Londýn, Velká Británie: Routledge. pp. 37-50.
    In his 1953 lectures at the College de France, Merleau-Ponty dedicated much effort to further developing his idea of embodied subject and interpreted fresh sources that he did not use in Phenomenology of Perception. Notably, he studied more in depth the neurological notion of "body schema". According to Merleau-Ponty, the body schema is a practical diagram of our relationships to the world, an action-based norm with reference to which things make sense. Merleau-Ponty more precisely tried to describe the fundamentally dynamic (...)
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  44. Givenness From Above.Karl Hefty - 2018 - Diakrisis 1:45-60.
    This article compares the concept of the living body in Edmund Husserl’s Ideas II with that of the French phenomenologist Michel Henry. It locates in their descriptions of the I Can a basic difference in the way they understand the roles that impressionality, affectivity, and perception play in the phenomenological method. It then examines Henry’s concept of “auto-affection” and argues that the “strong” and “weak” senses of auto-affection must be understood in terms of what Henry, following Kierkegaard, calls the “dialectic (...)
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  45. Emotions, Motivation, and Character: A Phenomenological Perspective.Elisa Magrì - 2018 - Husserl Studies 34 (3):229-245.
    In this paper, I wish to explore whether and how emotions build on a state of being motivated that is linked to character and requires the positive contribution of habit. Drawing on phenomenological accounts of motivation, I argue that the relation between emotions and character depends on the institution of an emotional space, which is responsible for our sensitivity to the values of the felt situation and yet it is open to changes and revisions.
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  46. Color Relationism and Enactive Ontology.Andrea Pace Giannotta - 2018 - Phenomenology and Mind 14:56-67.
    In this paper, I present the enactive theory of color that implies a form of color relationism. I argue that this view constitutes a better alternative to color subjectivism and color objectivism. I liken the enactive view to Husserl’s phenomenology of perception, arguing that both deconstruct the clear duality of subject and object, which is at the basis of the other theories of color, in order to claim the co-constitution of subject and object in the process of experience. I also (...)
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  47. Body and Space Relationship in the Research Field of Phenomenological Anthropology: Blumenberg’s Criticism of Edmund Husserl’s “Anthropology Phobia”.V. Prykhodko & S. Rudenko - 2018 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 13:30-40.
    Purpose. The article suggested for consideration is aimed at clarifying the shift in human perception from the spatial turn announced by Michel Foucault, to a performative turn. The performative turn has an anthropological footing. It is based on the all-round investigation of the body’s principal role for cultural existence, as a result of a reverse reaction to artificial conceptual gap between space and body, which basically means ignoring the embodiment theme. An example of such theoretical deformation was Edmund Husserl’s “anthropology (...)
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  48. Making Sense of the Lived Body and the Lived World: Meaning and Presence in Husserl, Derrida and Noë.Jacob Rump - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):141-167.
    I argue that Husserl’s transcendental account of the role of the lived body in sense-making is a precursor to Alva Noë’s recent work on the enactive, embodied mind, specifically his notion of “sensorimotor knowledge” as a form of embodied sense-making that avoids representationalism and intellectualism. Derrida’s deconstructive account of meaning—developed largely through a critique of Husserl—relies on the claim that meaning is structured through the complication of the “interiority” of consciousness by an “outside,” and thus might be thought to lend (...)
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  49. The living body and transcendental subjectivity in the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl.Rubén Sánchez Muñoz & Jorge Medina Delgadillo - 2018 - Veritas: Revista de Filosofía y Teología 40:9-28.
    Resumen En este trabajo se explora el problema del cuerpo vivo en la fenomenología trascendental de Edmund Husserl y el entrelazamiento que tiene con la conciencia trascendental. Para ello se exploran diversas capas o momentos del tema. Primero: la justificación de la ausencia de un tratamiento del cuerpo en Ideas I debido a su enfoque estático. Segundo: el problema propiamente dicho de la constitución del cuerpo vivo en Ideas II desde una fenomenología genética. Tercero: la posibilidad de una ética de (...)
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  50. Konstitution Oder Deduktion des Eigenleibes? Paradoxien der Leiblichkeit in der Transzendentalen Phänomenologie Husserls.Paul-Gabriel Sandu - 2018 - Meta: Research in Hermeneutics, Phenomenology, and Practical Philosophy 10 (2):317-332.
    The problem of embodiment and that of the constitution of the lived body are central to the Husserlian phenomenology. Husserl’s endeavor to develop a theory of intersubjectivity and his attempt to avoid the solipsistic conundrum depend on his ability to solve the riddle of embodiment. Nevertheless, Husserl struggled until the late thirties to find an adequate account of the constitution of the body, without much success. In this paper I try to show with the help of Merleau-Ponty, Derrida and Figal (...)
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