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  1. What Is Intentionality and Who Has Intentions in a Structuralist Model of Knowledge, Action and Thought.Hans Aebli - 1984 - Dialectica 38 (2‐3):231-242.
    The philosophical core of a psychological theory of cognitive processes is developped and commented, focussing on the problem of intentionality, this term being taken in the normal and in the phenomenological sense. Actions, perceived processes, their states and results, operations and concepts are seen as related insofar as they all establish relations between elements, are generated by construction and can be objectivated. These acts and/or the objectives that control them, are intentional insofar as their structure is activated. Such activation is (...)
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  2. The Hodgsonian Account of Temporal Experience.Holly Andersen - 2017 - In Ian Phillips (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Temporal Experience. Routledge.
    This chapter offers a overview of Shadworth Hodgson's account of experience as fundamentally temporal, an account that was deeply influential on thinkers such as William James and which prefigures the phenomenology of Husserl in many ways. I highlight eight key features that are characteristic of Hodgson's account, and how they hang together to provide a coherent overall picture of experience and knowledge. Hodgson's account is then compared to Husserl's, and I argue that Hodgson's account offers a better target for projects (...)
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  3. Restructuring Attentionality and Intentionality.P. Sven Arvidson - 2013 - Human Studies 36 (2):199-216.
    Phenomenology and experimental psychology have been largely interested in the same thing when it comes to attention. By building on the work of Aron Gurwitsch, especially his ideas of attention and restructuration, this paper attempts to articulate common ground in psychology and phenomenology of attention through discussion of a new way to think about multistability in some phenomena. What psychology views as an attentionality-intentionality phenomenon, phenomenology views as an intentionality-attentionality phenomenon. The proposal is that an awareness of this restructuring of (...)
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  4. Commentary on "Edmund Husserl's Influence on Karl Jaspers's Phenomenology".Jean-Michel Azorin & Jean Naudin - 1997 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (1):37-39.
  5. Closing the Gap: Some Questions for Neurophenomenology.Timothy J. Bayne - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (4):349-64.
    In his 1996 paper Neurophenomenology: A methodological remedy for the hard problem, Francisco Varela called for a union of Husserlian phenomenology and cognitive science. Varela''s call hasn''t gone unanswered, and recent years have seen the development of a small but growing literature intent on exploring the interface between phenomenology and cognitive science. But despite these developments, there is still some obscurity about what exactly neurophenomenology is. What are neurophenomenologists trying to do, and how are they trying to do it? To (...)
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  6. Neurophenomenology – A Special Issue.M. Beaton, B. Pierce & S. A. J. Stuart - 2013 - Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):265-268.
    Context: Seventeen years ago Francisco Varela introduced neurophenomenology. He proposed the integration of phenomenological approaches to first-person experience – in the tradition of Husserl, Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty – with a neuro-dynamical, scientific approach to the study of the situated brain and body. Problem: It is time for a re-appraisal of this field. Has neurophenomenology already contributed to the sciences of the mind? If so, how? How should it best do so in future? Additionally, can neurophenomenology really help to resolve or (...)
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  7. The Phenomenological Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science.Anthony F. Beavers - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):533-537.
    The Phenomenological Mind, by Shaun Gallagher and Dan Zahavi, is part of a recent initiative to show that phenomenology, classically conceived as the tradition inaugurated by Edmund Husserl and not as mere introspection, contributes something important to cognitive science. (For other examples, see “References” below.) Phenomenology, of course, has been a part of cognitive science for a long time. It implicitly informs the works of Andy Clark (e.g. 1997) and John Haugeland (e.g. 1998), and Hubert Dreyfus explicitly uses it (e.g. (...)
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  8. Phenomenology and Artificial Intelligence.Anthony F. Beavers - 2002 - Metaphilosophy 33 (1-2):70-82.
    In CyberPhilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing, edited by James H. Moor and Terrell Ward Bynum (Oxford, UK: Blackwell, 2002), 66-77. Also in Metaphilosophy 33.1/2 (2002): 70-82.
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  9. Science and Dialectics in a Phenomenological Anthropology.Pedro Luis Blasco - 1991 - Analecta Husserliana 35:355.
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  10. Developing Open Intersubjectivity: On the Interpersonal Shaping of Experience.Matt Bower - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (3):455-474.
    The aim of this paper is to motivate the need for and then present the outline of an alternative explanation of what Dan Zahavi has dubbed “open intersubjectivity,” which captures the basic interpersonal character of perceptual experience as such. This is a notion whose roots lay in Husserl’s phenomenology. Accordingly, the paper begins by situating the notion of open intersubjectivity – as well as the broader idea of constituting intersubjectivity to which it belongs – within Husserl’s phenomenology as an approach (...)
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  11. Husserl, Intentionality, and Cognitive Architecture.Charles S. Brown - 1990 - Southwest Philosophy Review 6 (1):65-72.
  12. Structural Phenomenology: An Empirically-Based Model of Consciousness.Steven Ravett Brown - 2004 - Dissertation, University of Oregon
    In this dissertation I develop a structural model of phenomenal consciousness that integrates contemporary experimental and theoretical work in philosophy and cognitive science. I argue that phenomenology must be “naturalized” and that it should be acknowledged as a major component of empirical research. I use this model to describe important phenomenal structures, and I then employ it to provide a detailed explication of tip-of-tongue phenomena. The primary aim of “structural phenomenology” is the creation of a general framework within which descriptions (...)
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  13. Phenomenology and Cognitive Science, Moving Beyond the Paradigms.Ronald Bruzina - 2004 - Husserl Studies 20 (1):43-88.
  14. The Ideal Scaffolding of Language: Husser's Fourth Logical Investigation in the Light of Cognitive Linguistics. [REVIEW]Peer F. Bundgaard - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):49-80.
    One of the central issues in linguistics is whether or not language should be considered a self-contained, autonomous formal system, essentially reducible to the syntactic algorithms of meaning construction (as Chomskyan grammar would have it), or a holistic-functional system serving the means of expressing pre-organized intentional contents and thus accessible with respect to features and structures pertaining to other cognitive subsystems or to human experience as such (as Cognitive Linguistics would have it). The latter claim depends critically on the existence (...)
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  15. The Cognitive Gap, Neural Darwinism & Linguistic Dualism —Russell, Husserl, Heidegger & Quine.Hermann G. W. Burchard - 2014 - Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):244-264.
    Guided by key insights of the four great philosophers mentioned in the title, here, in review of and expanding on our earlier work (Burchard, 2005, 2011), we present an exposition of the role played by language, & in the broader sense, λογοζ, the Logos, in how the CNS, the brain, is running the human being. Evolution by neural Darwinism has been forcing the linguistic nature of mind, enabling it to overcome & exploit the cognitive gap between an animal and its (...)
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  16. Empathy, Simulation, and Neuroscience: A Phenomenological Case Against Simulation Theory.Timothy Burns - 2017 - Phenomenology and Mind 12:208-216.
    In recent years, some simulation theorists have claimed that the discovery of mirror neurons provides empirical support for the position that mind reading is, at some basic level, simulation. The purpose of this essay is to question that claim. I begin by providing brief context for the current mind reading debate and then developing an influential simulationist account of mind reading. I then draw on the works of Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein to develop an alternative, phenomenological account. In conclusion, (...)
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  17. Natalie Depraz, Francisco J. Varela, Pierre Vermersch, À l'épreuve de l'expérience - Pour une pratique phénoménologique. [REVIEW]Denisa Butnaru - 2012 - Studia Phaenomenologica 12:434-437.
  18. Husserl and the Phenomenological Description of Imagery: Some Issues for the Cognitive Sciences?Carmelo Calì - 2005 - ARHE 2 (4):25-37.
    This paper deals with two theories Husserl worked out on imagery in order to see if the properties a phenomenological description ascribes to imagery are fit to give meaningful constraints upon theoretical models that guide empirical research. Husserlian descriptions and Kosslyn and colleagues models are hence compared as to their explanatory strategy and implications.
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  19. Réflexions sur l'altérité et l'animalité.Georges Chapouthier - 2009 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 134 (2):207-216.
    Comment fonder l’altérité et ses conséquences morales ? Sur le plan neurobiologique, les animaux évolués et l’homme sont très proches. Berthoz et Petit offrent une approche phénoménologique de l’intersubjectivité fondée sur les kinesthèses de Husserl. Nous montrons que cette position n’est pas contradictoire avec la neurobiologie et qu’elle appelle, sur le plan moral, à inclure les animaux dans l’altérité. D’autant que, comme le montre Burgat, la question de l’animal peut être considérée comme l’un des enjeux essentiels de la phénoménologie.How to (...)
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  20. Mind, Consciousness, and Cognition: Phenomenology Vs. Cognitive Science. [REVIEW]Nader N. Chokr - 1992 - Husserl Studies 9 (3):179-197.
  21. Gallagher, Shaun, and Schmicking, Daniel (Editors). (2010). Handbook of Phenomenology and Cognitive Science. [REVIEW]Thomas F. Cloonan - 2012 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 43 (2):251-260.
  22. Die Erfahrung des Anderen. Phänomenologie, Behaviorismus und Spiegelneuronen.Vincenzo Costa - 2008 - Husserl Studies 24 (3):231-241.
    The recent discovery of a mirror neuron system sets a challenge for a philosophy of experience such as phenomenology, because in humans and monkeys the mirror system seems to transform seen actions into an inner representation of these actions. This paper tries to outline the guidelines of a transcendental-phenomenological analysis of alterity, different from empirical research. The transcendental research must provide a criterion for interpreting the results of empirical science. On this basis the paper compares the phenomenological analysis of alterity (...)
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  23. Intentionality, Identity, and Delusions of Control in Schizophrenia: A Husserlian Perspective.Larry Davidson - 2002 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 33 (1):39-58.
    In response to criticisms of phenomenology as being a solipsistic approach to psychological research and theory, this paper examines the interplay of both the creative/active and receptive/passive constituents of subjective experience identified in Husserl's exposition of intentional analysis. By delineating the ways in which intentional constitution requires passive as well as active processes, we come to see in the first part of this paper how experience and personal identity are as much formed and informed by the social and historical world (...)
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  24. From Ego to Alter Ego: Husserl, Merleau-Ponty and a Layered Approach to Intersubjectivity.Helena de Preester - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):133-142.
    This article presents two different phenomenological paths leading from ego to alter ego: a Husserlian and a Merleau-Pontian way of thinking. These two phenomenological paths serve to disentangle the conceptual–philosophical underpinning of the mirror neurons system hypothesis, in which both ways of thinking are entwined. A Merleau-Pontian re-reading of the mirror neurons system theory is proposed, in which the characteristics of mirror neurons are effectively used in the explanation of action understanding and imitation. This proposal uncovers the remaining necessary presupposition (...)
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  25. Empathy and Second-Person Methodology.Natalie Depraz - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (3):447-459.
    How the phenomenology of empathy in Husserl and beyond and the second-person approach of cognition are able to mutually enrich and constrain each other? Whereas the intersubjective empathy is limited to face-to-face inter-individual relational experiences or, when socially embedded, results a non-individualized understanding of others in general, the second person approach of cognition opens the way for a plural relational yet individualized understanding of the other. I would like to show in this paper how the integration of both phenomenological and (...)
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  26. L'épiphénoménologie de Husserl in phénoménologie et psychologie cognitive.Hubert Dreyfus - 1991 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 1:57-77.
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  27. Husserl, Intentionality, and Cognitive Science.Hubert L. Dreyfus & Harrison Hall (eds.) - 1982 - MIT Press.
  28. Phenomenology-Friendly Neuroscience: The Return To Merleau-Ponty As Psychologist.Ralph D. Ellis - 2006 - Human Studies 29 (1):33-55.
    This paper reports on the Kuhnian revolution now occurring in neuropsychology that is finally supportive of and friendly to phenomenology — the "enactive" approach to the mind-body relation, grounded in the notion of self-organization, which is consistent with Husserl and Merleau-Ponty on virtually every point. According to the enactive approach, human minds understand the world by virtue of the ways our bodies can act relative to it, or the ways we can imagine acting. This requires that action be distinguished from (...)
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  29. A Cognitive Way to the Transcendental Reduction.Shaun Gallagher - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (2-3):230-232.
    [opening paragraph]: Natalie Depraz builds on Iso Kern's distinctions to outline three different motivational pathways to the phenomenological reduction -- the Cartesian way, the psychological way, and the way of the life-world. I would like to suggest a fourth one that may appeal to cognitive neuroscientists and neuropsychologists, theorists who, for the most part, are not ordinarily motivated to pursue phenomenological methodologies.
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  30. Mutual Enlightenment: Recent Phenomenology in Cognitive Science.Shaun Gallagher - 1997 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (3):195-214.
    The term phenomenology can be used in a generic sense to cover a variety of areas related to the problem of consciousness. In this sense it is a title that ranges over issues pertaining to first-person or subjective experience, qualia, and what has become known as "the hard problem" (Chalmers 1995). The term is sometimes used even more generally to signify a variety of approaches to studying such issues, including contemplative, meditative, and mystical studies, and transpersonal psychology.(1) Within the disciplines (...)
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  31. Précis: The Phenomenological Mind.Shaun Gallagher & Dan Zahavi - 2008 - Abstracta 4 (3):4-9.
    It is difficult to give a nice succinct précis of The Phenomenological Mind since it is composed of a set of chapters each of which addresses a different topic. The topics are linked in numerous ways. There is one way, however, in which all of the chapters are bound together to constitute a unified whole, and this might be considered something like a framework proposition. Phenomenology, understood as the philosophical approach taken up by Husserl and a number of people who (...)
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  32. Varela on the Pragmatic Dimension of Phenomenology.Andrea Pace Giannotta - 2017 - Constructivist Foundations 13 (1):78-81.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Varela’s Radical Proposal: How to Embody and Open Up Cognitive Science” by Kristian Moltke Martiny. Upshot: I examine Varela’s relationship with Husserl’s phenomenology, highlighting Varela’s acknowledgment of the pragmatic dimension of its phenomenological reduction. I argue that Varela sees, in some developments of phenomenology, a deconstruction of the subject-object duality and an embodied view of the mind. I also highlight the existential dimension of Varela’s radical proposal, which contributes to further opening up and embodying (...)
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  33. Reflections on Therapeutic Practice Guided by a Husserlian Perspective.Barbro Giorgi - 2005 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 36 (2):141-194.
    In this article, there is a suggestion that the application of certain key concepts or procedures of Husserlian phenomenology can be helpful in the practice of therapy. It is well known that how a therapist is present to a client and his or her story is critical for the success of therapy. What is less clear, however, is how to address this "way of being" in therapy and what kinds of interventions are helpful to clients. In addressing some of these (...)
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  34. Naturalizing Phenomenology: Cognitive Science and the Bestowal of Sense.Andrew Goffey - 2002 - Radical Philosophy 114:20-28.
  35. How to, and How Not to, Bridge Computational Cognitive Neuroscience and Husserlian Phenomenology of Time Consciousness.Rick Grush - 2006 - Synthese 153 (3):417-450.
    A number of recent attempts to bridge Husserlian phenomenology of time consciousness and contemporary tools and results from cognitive science or computational neuroscience are described and critiqued. An alternate proposal is outlined that lacks the weaknesses of existing accounts.
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  36. In Defense of My Reading of Husserl and a Final Note.Peter Hadreas - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):61-64.
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  37. Husserlian Self-Awareness and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors.Peter Hadreas - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):43-51.
    The goal of the paper is to offer a model of self-awareness that fits the testimony of both good and bad responders to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), of which fluoxetine (Prozac; Lilly, Indianapolis, IN) is probably the most well known. After a review of troubling current uncertainties concerning how and for whom SSRIs are therapeutic, it is argued that SSRIs, as a rule, lessen the emotionality of SSRI subjects in favor of an increased cognitive and volitional orientation. Traditional empiricist (...)
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  38. A Complexity Basis for Phenomenology: How Information States at Criticality Offer a New Approach to Understanding Experience of Self, Being and Time.Alex Hankey - 2015 - Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 119:288–302.
    In the late 19th century Husserl studied our internal sense of time passing, maintaining that its deep connections into experience represent prima facie evidence for it as the basis for all investigations in the sciences: Phenomenology was born. Merleau-Ponty focused on perception pointing out that any theory of experience must in accord with established aspects of biology i.e. embodied. Recent analyses suggest that theories of experience require non-reductive, integrative information, together with a specific property connecting them to experience. Here we (...)
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  39. Reflections on Charles S. Brown's “Husserl, Intentionality, and Cognitive Architecture”. [REVIEW]Charles W. Harvey - 1990 - Southwest Philosophy Review 6 (2):119-122.
  40. Mirror Neurons, Husserl, and Enactivism: An Analysis of Phenomenological Compatibility.Genevieve Hayman - 2016 - Perspectives 6 (1):13-23.
    The potential for mirror neuron research to explain various aspects of social cognition has received considerable attention over the past two decades. Initially, mirror neuron research may seem in accordance with a phenomenological understanding of intersubjectivity, but the work of Dan Zahavi will be used to highlight significant incompatibilities between the two. Likewise, the enactivists Thomas Fuchs and Hanne De Jaegher identify significant issues with current interpretations of mirror neuron research and provide an alternative description of intersubjectivity. This article will (...)
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  41. L'intentionnalité en question: entre phénoménologie et recherches cognitives.Dominique Janicaud - 1995 - Vrin.
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  42. On the Development of Husserl's Transcendental Phenomenology of Imagination and its Use for Interdisciplinary Research.Julia Jansen - 2005 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):121-132.
    In this paper I trace Husserl’s transformation of his notion of phantasy from its strong leanings towards empiricism into a transcendental phenomenology of imagination. Rejecting the view that this account is only more incompatible with contemporary neuroscientific research, I instead claim that the transcendental suspension of naturalistic (or scientific) pretensions precisely enables cooperation between the two distinct realms of phenomenology and science. In particular, a transcendental account of phantasy can disclose the specific accomplishments of imagination without prematurely deciding upon a (...)
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  43. Constitution Embodiment.Alexander Albert Jeuk - 2017 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 8 (1):131-158.
    In this paper I analyze constitution embodiment, a particular conception of embodiment. Proponents of constitution embodiment claim that the body is a condition of the constitution of entities. Constitution embodiment is popular with phenomenologically-inspired Embodied Cognition, including research projects such as Enactivism and Radical Embodied Cognitive Science. Unfortunately, PEC’s use of constitution embodiment is neither clear nor coherent; in particular, PEC uses the concept of constitution embodiment so that a major inconsistency is entailed. PEC conceives of the body in a (...)
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  44. Метаметодологічні Особливості Метатеорії Повсякдення.Ihor Karivets - 2014 - Схід 2 (128):136-141.
    У західноєвропейській соціальній філософії та соціальній теорії осмислення повсякдення має довгу традицію. У статті аналізуються не лише наявні теорії повсякдення, але й робиться спроба вийти на метатеоретичний рівень, щоб визначити межі цих теорій та тих методів, які використовувалися для їхньої побудови. Автор статті доводить, що на часі запровадження такого дослідження повсякдення, у якому б органічно поєднувалися метатеоретичні пошуки з конкретним феноменом повсякдення, таким, яким він постає перед свідомістю звичайної людини.
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  45. Being and Time, §15: Around-for References and the Content of Mundane Concern.Howard Damian Kelly - 2013 - Dissertation, The University of Manchester
    This thesis articulates a novel interpretation of Heidegger’s explication of the being (Seins) of gear (Zeugs) in §15 of his masterwork Being and Time (1927/2006) and develops and applies the position attributed to Heidegger to explain three phenomena of unreflective action discussed in recent literature and articulate a partial Heideggerian ecological metaphysics. Since §15 of BT explicates the being of gear, Part 1 expounds Heidegger’s concept of the ‘being’ (Seins) of beings (Seienden) and two issues raised in the ‘preliminary methodological (...)
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  46. Constitutive Strata and the Dorsal Stream.Kristjan Laasik - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):419-435.
    In his paper, “The Dorsal Stream and the Visual Horizon,” Michael Madary argues that “dorsal stream processing plays a main role in the spatiotemporal limits of visual perception, in what Husserl identified as the visual horizon” (Madary 2011, p. 424). Madary regards himself as thereby providing a theoretical framework “sensitive to basic Husserlian phenomenology” (Madary 2011). In particular, Madary draws connections between perceptual anticipations and the experience of the indeterminate spatial margins, on the one hand, and the Husserlian spatiotemporal visual (...)
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  47. The You-I Event: On the Genesis of Self-Awareness.Stephen Langfur - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):769-790.
    I present empirical evidence suggesting that an infant first becomes aware of herself as the focal center of a caregiver's attending. Yet that does not account for her awareness of herself as agent. To address this question, I bring in research on neonatal imitation, as well as studies demonstrating the existence of a neural system in which parts of the same brain areas are activated when observing another's action and when executing a similar one. Applying these findings, I consider gestural (...)
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  48. H.L. Dreyfus , "Husserl, Intentionality, and Cognitive Science". [REVIEW]Lenore Langsdorf - 1985 - Husserl Studies 2 (3):303.
  49. Husserlian Meditations and Anthropological Reflections: Toward a Cultural Neurophenomenology of Experience and Reality.Charles D. Laughlin & C. Jason Throop - 2009 - Anthropology of Consciousness 20 (2):130-170.
    Most of us would agree that the world of our experience is different than the extramental reality of which we are a part. Indeed, the evidence pertaining to cultural cosmologies around the globe suggests that virtually all peoples recognize this distinction—hence the focus upon the "hidden" forces behind everyday events. That said, the struggle to comprehend the relationship between our consciousness and reality, even the reality of ourselves, has led to controversy and debate for centuries in Western philosophy. In this (...)
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  50. The Music of Consciousness: Can Musical Form Harmonize Phenomenology and the Brain?Dan Lloyd - 2013 - Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):324-331.
    Context: Neurophenomenology lies at a rich intersection of neuroscience and lived human experience, as described by phenomenology. As a new discipline, it is open to many new questions, methods, and proposals. Problem: The best available scientific ontology for neurophenomenology is based in dynamical systems. However, dynamical systems afford myriad strategies for organizing and representing neurodynamics, just as phenomenology presents an array of aspects of experience to be captured. Here, the focus is on the pervasive experience of subjective time. There is (...)
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