Husserl: Philosophy of Mind, Misc

Edited by Kristjan Laasik (Shandong University, University of Miami)
Assistant editor: Wei Qi (Shandong University)
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  1. Behaviorism and Normativity: The Prospect of a Skinnerian Psychologism.John Dennis Aach - 1987 - Dissertation, Boston University
    The thesis attempts to formulate a behavioristc definition of normativity based on proposals by B. F. Skinner in the context of a general analysis of the problem of reconciling psychology with normative science, especially logic. An introduction states the problem and briefly traces its historical roots. Chapter 1 traces modern acceptance of the view that psychology is irrelevant to normative science to Husserl's and Frege's victorious arguments against nineteenth century psychologism, and aims to show them inconclusive against modern psychologies through (...)
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  2. The Site of Affect in Husserl’s Phenomenology: Sensations and the Constitution of the Lived Body.Alia Al-Saji - 2000 - Philosophy Today 44 (Supplement):51-59.
    To discover affects within Husserl’s texts designates a difficult investigation; it points to a theme of which these texts were forced to speak, even as they were explicitly speaking of regional ontologies and the foundations of sciences. For we may at first wonder: where can affection find a positive role in the rigor of a pure philosophy that seeks to account for its phenomena from within the immanence of consciousness? Does this not mean that the very passivity and foreignness of (...)
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  3. Husserl's Struggle with Mental Images: Imaging and Imagining Reconsidered. [REVIEW]Andreea Smaranda Aldea - 2013 - Continental Philosophy Review 46 (3):371-394.
    Husserl’s extensive analyses of image consciousness (Bildbewusstsein) and of the imagination (Phantasie) offer insightful and detailed structural explications. However, despite this careful work, Husserl’s discussions fail to overcome the need to rely on a most problematic concept: mental images. The epistemological conundrums triggered by the conceptual framework of mental images are well known—we have only to remember the questions regarding knowledge acquisition that plagued British empiricism. Beyond these problems, however, a plethora of important questions arise from claiming that mental images (...)
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  4. Intentionality and Intersubjectivity.Jan Almäng - 2007 - Dissertation, Göteborg University
    1. Introduction. The problems of other minds ; Body, mind and other minds ; The analogical theory ; The critical theory ; Functionalism and mental states as theoretical entities ; A brief outline of things to come -- 2. Functionalism and the nature of mental representations. Functionalism and cognitive psychology ; Folk psychology and the representational theory of mind -- 3. Theory theory and simulation theory. A very short introduction to the world of theory theory and simulation theory ; A (...)
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  5. The Phenomenology and Its History: A Case Study on Heidegger’s Early Relation to Husserl and a Plea for the Historical Method in Phenomenology.Varga Peter Andres - 2015 - Dialogue and Universalism 3 (3):87-104.
  6. Transzendentalphilosophie und Psychologie Zum Begriff der „Phänomenologischen Psychologie" bei Husserl.Gerhard Arlt - 1984 - Perspektiven der Philosophie 10:161-179.
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  7. How to Understand Consciousness: The Strength of the Phenomenological Method.Maria Armezzani - 2009 - World Futures 65 (2):101 – 110.
    Analyzing the outline of the endless literature on consciousness, the separation between science and philosophy rather than being overcome, seems to come back in different shapes. According to this point of view, the hard problem seems to be how to study consciousness while avoiding a slip back to the old dualism. This article outlines the advantages of the phenomenological method. This method, more than getting over the mind-body separation, anticipates it through an open gaze, able to bring back the human (...)
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  8. L'enigma Dell'ovvio la Fenomenologia di Husserl Come Fondamento di Un'altra Psicologia.Maria Armezzani - 1998
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  9. The Role of Feelings in Husserl's Ethics.Christopher Arroyo - 2009 - Idealistic Studies 39 (1/3):11-22.
    Though Husserl tends to receive less attention than other phenomenologists, there is growing interest in his ethics. Proponents of Husserl’s ethics argue that his moral philosophy is not merely of historical interest; Husserl, they claim, can contribute positively to contemporary debates in ethics, specifically debates about the role of feelings in moral agency. This paper raises questions about this last claim. I argue that, on the one hand, Husserl’s moral psychology proves superior to some of his modern predecessors, insofar as (...)
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  10. Restructuring Attentionality and Intentionality.P. Sven Arvidson - 2013 - Human Studies 36 (2):199-216.
    Phenomenology and experimental psychology have been largely interested in the same thing when it comes to attention. By building on the work of Aron Gurwitsch, especially his ideas of attention and restructuration, this paper attempts to articulate common ground in psychology and phenomenology of attention through discussion of a new way to think about multistability in some phenomena. What psychology views as an attentionality-intentionality phenomenon, phenomenology views as an intentionality-attentionality phenomenon. The proposal is that an awareness of this restructuring of (...)
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  11. The Disinterested Spectator: Geiger’s and Husserl’s Place in the Debate on the Splitting of the Ego.Michele Averchi - 2015 - Studia Phaenomenologica 15:227-246.
    Moritz Geiger developed an original phenomenological account of the splitting of the Ego in two papers, written in 1911 and 1913. Husserl read the 1911 paper as he was working on preliminary manuscripts to Ideas I. The first part of Husserl’s comments focused precisely on the splitting of the Ego. In this paper I will answer three questions: What is the historical-philosophical context of Geiger’s and Husserl’s discussion on the splitting of the ego? What are the phenomenological features of the (...)
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  12. Tymieniecka’s Phenomenology of Life: The “Imaginatio Creatrix,” Subliminal Passions, and the Moral Sense.G. Backhaus - 2001 - Consciousness and Emotion 2 (1):103-134.
    Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka expands the phenomenological study of meanings (sense-bestowal) into an onto-genetic inquiry by grounding it in a phenomenology of life, including the emotional dimension. This phenomenology of life is informed by the empirical sciences and its doctrines parallel the new scientific paradigm of open dynamic systems. Embedded in the dynamics of the real individuation of life forms, human consciousness emerges at a unique station in the evolutionary process. Tymieniecka treats the constitution of sense as a function of life, and (...)
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  13. Robin D. Rollinger, Austrian Phenomenology: Brentano, Husserl, Meinong, and Others on Mind and Object. [REVIEW]Kimberly Baltzer-Jaray - 2011 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 15 (2):209-212.
  14. Husserl's Theory of Language as Calculus Ratiocinator.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 1997 - Synthese 112 (3):303-321.
    This paper defends an interpretation of Husserl''s theory of language, specifically as it appears in the Logical Investigations, as an example of a larger body of theories dubbed ''language as calculus''. Although this particular interpretation has been previously defended by other authors, such as Hintikka and Kusch, this paper proposes to contribute to the discussion by arguing that what makes this interpretation plausible are Husserl''s distinction between the notions of meaning-intention and meaning-fulfillment, his view that meaning is instantiated through meaning-intending (...)
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  15. Ego and Reduction: A Key to the Development of Husserl's Phenomenology.John Dennis Banja - 1975 - Dissertation, Fordham University
  16. Closing the Gap: Some Questions for Neurophenomenology.Timothy J. Bayne - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (4):349-64.
    In his 1996 paper Neurophenomenology: A methodological remedy for the hard problem, Francisco Varela called for a union of Husserlian phenomenology and cognitive science. Varela''s call hasn''t gone unanswered, and recent years have seen the development of a small but growing literature intent on exploring the interface between phenomenology and cognitive science. But despite these developments, there is still some obscurity about what exactly neurophenomenology is. What are neurophenomenologists trying to do, and how are they trying to do it? To (...)
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  17. Neurophenomenology – A Special Issue.M. Beaton, B. Pierce & S. A. J. Stuart - 2013 - Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):265-268.
    Context: Seventeen years ago Francisco Varela introduced neurophenomenology. He proposed the integration of phenomenological approaches to first-person experience – in the tradition of Husserl, Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty – with a neuro-dynamical, scientific approach to the study of the situated brain and body. Problem: It is time for a re-appraisal of this field. Has neurophenomenology already contributed to the sciences of the mind? If so, how? How should it best do so in future? Additionally, can neurophenomenology really help to resolve or (...)
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  18. The Phenomenological Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science.Anthony F. Beavers - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):533-537.
    The Phenomenological Mind, by Shaun Gallagher and Dan Zahavi, is part of a recent initiative to show that phenomenology, classically conceived as the tradition inaugurated by Edmund Husserl and not as mere introspection, contributes something important to cognitive science. (For other examples, see “References” below.) Phenomenology, of course, has been a part of cognitive science for a long time. It implicitly informs the works of Andy Clark (e.g. 1997) and John Haugeland (e.g. 1998), and Hubert Dreyfus explicitly uses it (e.g. (...)
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  19. La radicalización Heideggeriana del método fenomenológico.Josep María Bech - 2000 - Convivium 13:60-90.
    Contends that Heideggerian “fundamental ontology” and Husserlian phenomenology, while linked by methodological affinities (hermeneutics would be the operational correlative to phenomenology’s transcendental embrace), are thematically incongruent. It also holds that the self-display of Being clashes with the un-methodical dimension assigned to immediacy by the phenomenological tradition. Through reshaping Husserl’s presentialist transcendentalism, Heidegger cast anew the methodology grounded upon “presentifying intuitiveness” and tailored it to an expanded notion of “phenomenon”.
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  20. Husserl and the Phenomenology of Attention.Bruce Bégout - 2007 - In Luciano Boi, Pierre Kerszberg & Frédéric Patras (eds.), Rediscovering Phenomenology: Phenomenological Essays on Mathematical Beings, Physical Reality, Perception and Consciousness (Phaenomenologica) (English and French Edition). Springer. pp. 13-32.
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  21. La théorie phénoménologique de la négation, entre acte et sens.Jocelyn Benoist - 2001 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 2 (2):21-35.
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  22. Qu'y a-t-il au-delà de la psychologie?Jocelyn Benoist - 1999 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 189 (3):345 - 361.
    Il semble que la philosophie doive abandonner ses prétentions fondationnalistes par rapport à la psychologie. Mais est-elle, quant à elle, indépendante de la psychologie ? Le naturalisme contemporain est animé de la conviction inverse. L'auteur essaie de montrer ici, sur les exemples de Bolzano et de Husserl, ce que peut signifier l'adoption d'une attitude anti-psychologiste en philosophie. Il suggère que cette attitude est compatible avec une sorte de naturalisme problématique et spécifiquement philosophique. Philosophy must apparently give up its claims to (...)
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  23. Qu'est-ce qu'un jugement?Jocelyn Benoist - 1998 - Études Phénoménologiques 14 (27-28):169-192.
  24. Mind, Meaning and Mathematics. Essays on the Philosophical Views of Husserl and Frege, by Leila Haaparanta. [REVIEW]Jocelyn Benoist - 1995 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 57 (4):760.
  25. The Body as a 'Legitimate Naturalization of Consciousness'.Rudolf Bernet - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:43-65.
    Husserl's phenomenology of the body constantly faces issues of demarcation: between phenomenology and ontology, soul and spirit, consciousness and brain, conditionality and causality. It also shows that Husserl was eager to cross the borders of transcendental phenomenology when the phenomena under investigation made it necessary. Considering the details of his description of bodily sensations and bodily behaviour from a Merleau-Pontian perspective allows one also to realise how Husserl (unlike Heidegger) fruitfully explores a phenomenological field located between a science of pure (...)
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  26. Desiring to Know Through Intuition.Rudolf Bernet - 2003 - Husserl Studies 19 (2):153-166.
    The major part of this paper is devoted to the task of showing that Husserl's account of knowledge and truth in terms of a synthesis of fulfilment falls prey neither to a form of “metaphysics of presence” nor to a “myth of interiority” or mentalism. Husserl's presentation of the desire to know, his awareness of irreducible forms of absence at the heart of the intuitive presence of the object of knowledge and his formulation of general rules concerning the possible accomplishment (...)
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  27. Unconscious Consciousness in Husserl and Freud.Rudolf Bernet - 2002 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (3):327-351.
    A clarification of Husserl's changing conceptions of imaginary consciousness ( phantasy ) and memory, especially at the level of auto-affective time-consciousness, suggests an interpretation of Freud's concept of the Unconscious. Phenomenology of consciousness can show how it is possible that consciousness can bring to present appearance something unconscious, that is, something foreign or absent to consciousness, without incorporating it into or subordinating it to the conscious present. This phenomenological analysis of Freud's concept of the Unconscious leads to a partial critique (...)
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  28. Derrida-Husserl-Freud: The Trace of Transference.Rudolf Bernet - 1994 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (S1):141-158.
  29. Edmund Husserl: Critical Assessments of Leading Philosophers.Rudolf Bernet, Donn Welton & Gina Zavota (eds.) - 2005 - Routledge.
    This collection makes available, in one place, the very best essays on the founding father of phenomenology, reprinting key writings on Husserl's thought from the past seventy years. It draws together a range of writings, many otherwise inaccessible, that have been recognized as seminal contributions not only to an understanding of this great philosopher but also to the development of his phenomenology. The four volumes are arranged as follows: Volume I Classic essays from Husserl's assistants, students and earlier interlocutors. Including (...)
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  30. Contextualism and the Background of (Philosophical) Justification.Christian Beyer - 2007 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 74 (1):291-305.
    I propose to apply a version of contextualism about knowledge to the special case that represents the topic of this volume. I begin by motivating my preferred version of contextualism, which may be labelled as conventionalist contextualism; here I start from a well-known problem that besets epistemic internalism (section I). Following this, I pose a problem for conventionalist contextualism and argue that it can be solved by invoking, first, the idea of what I shall call the lifewordly background of epistemic (...)
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  31. A Neo-Husserlian Theory of Speaker's Reference.Christian Beyer - 2001 - Erkenntnis 54 (3):277-297.
    It is not well known that in his Göttingen period (1900–1916) Edmund Husserl developed a kind of direct reference theory, anticipating,among other things, the distinction between referential and attributive use of adefinite description, which was rediscovered by Keith Donnellan in 1966 and further analysed by Saul Kripke in 1977. This paper defends the claim that Husserl''s idea of the mental act given voice to in an utterance sheds new light on that distinction and particularly on cases where semantic referent and (...)
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  32. Christian Beyer, Intentionalität Und Referenz. Eine Sprachanalytische Studie Zu Husserls Transzendentaler Phänomenologie.Matteo Bianchin - 2003 - Husserl Studies 19 (3):217-224.
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  33. Questions Regarding Husserlian Geometry and Phenomenology. A Study of the Concept of Manifold and Spatial Perception.Luciano Boi - 2004 - Husserl Studies 20 (3):207-267.
  34. The Origins and Early Development of Edmund Husserl's Method of Phenomenological Reduction.Philip Joseph Bossert - 1973 - Dissertation, Washington University
  35. Geistiger Verkehr et für wer immer Geltung: figures de l’intersubjectivité dans les Recherches logiques de Edmund Husserl.Bertrand Bouckaert - 1997 - Études Phénoménologiques 13 (25):77-104.
  36. Husserl and Heidegger on Human Experience.W. F. Bracken - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (3):420-422.
    "In this book Pierre Keller examines the distinctive contributions, and the respective limitations, of Husserl's and Heidegger's approach to fundamental elements of human experience. He shows how their accounts of time, meaning, and personal identity are embedded in important alternative conceptions of how experience may be significant for us, and discusses both how these conceptions are related to each other and how they fit into a wider philosophical context."--BOOK JACKET.
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  37. Explaining Consciousness: Naturalizing the Phenomenological.Glenn Braddock - 2001 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Albany
    In this dissertation I defend the view that phenomenology has an important role to play in the naturalistic sciences of the mind. Phenomenological properties are real, causally efficacious features of the mind, but these properties are not always immediately discernible by common sense. Thus we require phenomenology to reveal these properties, the knowledge of which will contribute to our understanding of our mental lives. ;Contemporary, naturalistic theorists tend to either hope for a reductive or an eliminative account of consciousness or, (...)
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  38. Belief and its Neutralization: Husserl's System of Phenomenology in Ideas I.Marcus Brainard - 2002 - State University of New York Press.
    Presenting the first step-by-step commentary on Husserl’s Ideas I, Marcus Brainard’s Belief and Its Neutralization provides an introduction not only to this central work, but also to the whole of transcendental phenomenology. Brainard offers a clear and lively account of each key element in Ideas I, along with a novel reading of Husserl, one which may well cause scholars to reconsider many long-standing views on his thought, especially on the role of belief, the effect and scope of the epoché, and (...)
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  39. Phenomenology and the "Science of Medical Imaging".Mindaugas Briedis - 2011 - Glimpse 13:21-28.
    In this article I will bring phenomenological analysis to medicine, but differently from many "humane" approaches to various medical issues, I will explore from the standpoint of Husserlian phenomenological philosophy one "empirical" method of medical diagnostics, i.e. medical imaging, which in turn belongs to the celebrated tradition of scientific imaging. Hence I will relate three major Husserlian projects, that is Categorial intuition. Image Consciousness and Constitution of the Other to radiological diagnostics, based on various modes of medical imaging, for example, (...)
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  40. Husserl on Memory.John B. Brough - 1975 - The Monist 59 (1):40-62.
    The point of departure for husserl's mature account of memory is his rejection of the traditional view that what is immediately and directly experienced in memory is a present image or replica of what is past and not what is past itself. Husserl rejects the image theory on logical and descriptive grounds, Arguing that memory is a direct consciousness of the past. Memory is experienced as a unique mode of consciousness giving its object in a manner irreducible to pictorial or (...)
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  41. Husserl, Intentionality, and Cognitive Architecture.Charles S. Brown - 1990 - Southwest Philosophy Review 6 (1):65-72.
  42. Must Phenomenology Rest on Paradox?: Implications of Methodology-Limited Theories.Steven Brown - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (12):5-32.
    Husserlian phenomenology depends upon a particular and limited set of related methodologies, which assume not merely abilities and results on the part of phenomenologists which have been severely criticized, but more profoundly, that mental contents are atomistic and independently manipulable. I will show not only that this assumption is mistaken and that questioning it undermines traditional phenomenological method, but that it leads to a paradox when turned upon itself which forces the rejection of a purely Husserlian phenomenology. More generally, any (...)
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  43. Über das Verhältnis Edmund Husserls zu Franz Brentano.Maria Brück - 1933 - Triltsch.
  44. Husserl's “Naturalism” and Genetic Phenomenology.Ronald Bruzina - 2010 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 10 (1):91-125.
  45. To Remember Memory.Ella Buceniece - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 21:15-24.
    At present, when we live under the duress of the speed/quantity/fleeting impressions dictatorship, no possibility avails to formulate one’s total identity in horizontal and vertical dimensions, and therefore a serious danger confronts us to loose our historical consciousness and the taste of the wholeness of life. Intrying to reach ever-new modes of acceleration, we tend to forget what is really worthwhile. Loosing of memories as to the events, emotions, places, people and things, culminates in the total loss of memory concerning (...)
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  46. The Ideal Scaffolding of Language: Husser's Fourth Logical Investigation in the Light of Cognitive Linguistics. [REVIEW]Peer F. Bundgaard - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):49-80.
    One of the central issues in linguistics is whether or not language should be considered a self-contained, autonomous formal system, essentially reducible to the syntactic algorithms of meaning construction (as Chomskyan grammar would have it), or a holistic-functional system serving the means of expressing pre-organized intentional contents and thus accessible with respect to features and structures pertaining to other cognitive subsystems or to human experience as such (as Cognitive Linguistics would have it). The latter claim depends critically on the existence (...)
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  47. Concerning Husserl's Apparent Metaphysical Idealism: A Critique of Roman Ingarden's Thesis.Charles Peter Busch - 1977 - Dissertation, University of Southern California
  48. Natalie Depraz, Francisco J. Varela, Pierre Vermersch, À l'épreuve de l'expérience - Pour une pratique phénoménologique. [REVIEW]Denisa Butnaru - 2012 - Studia Phaenomenologica 12:434-437.
  49. Typification and Phantasia.Denisa Butnaru - 2009 - Schutzian Research 1:201-225.
    The main endeavor of this project is to elucidate the correlation of two basic phenomenological concepts (typification and Phantasia), thereby allowing for a new discussion concerning the foundation of the life-world. While typification has been particularly developed in the social phenomenology of A. Schutz, Phantasia remains in a rather Husserlian “domain,” with regard to its phenomenological implications. In considering a new perspective, however, their discussion lends itself to a new understanding of the process of constitution. Namely, it will surpass the (...)
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  50. Phenomenology: Continuation and Criticism.Dorion Cairns, Fred Kersten & Richard M. Zaner (eds.) - 1973 - M. Nijhoff.
    Cairns, D. My own life.--Chapman, H. The phenomenon of language.--Embree, L. E. An interpretation of the doctrine of the ego in Husserl's Ideen.--Farber, M. The philosophic impact of the facts themselves.--Gurwitsch, A. Perceptual coherence as the foundation of the judgment of prediction.--Hartshorne, C. Husserl and Whitehead on the concrete.--Jordan, R. W. Being and time: some aspects of the ego's involvement in his mental life.--Kersten, F. Husserl's doctrine of noesis-noema.--McGill, V. J. Evidence in Husserl's phenomenology.--Natanson, M. Crossing the Manhattan Bridge.--Spiegelberg, H. (...)
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