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  1. From Einstein's Physics to Neurophilosophy: On the Notions of Space, Time and Field as Cognoscitive Conditions Under Kantian-Husserlian Approach in the General Relativity Theory.Ruth Castillo - forthcoming - Bitácora-E.
    The current technoscientific progress has led to a sectorization in the philosophy of science. Today the philosophy of science isn't is informal interested in studying old problems about the general characteristics of scientific practice. The interest of the philosopher of science is the study of concepts, problems and riddles of particular disciplines. Then, within this progress of philosophy of science, neuroscientific research stands out, because it invades issues traditionally addressed by the humanities, such as the nature of consciousness, action, knowledge, (...)
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  2. One Table or Two? Scientific Anti-Realism and Husserl’s Phenomenology.Lee Hardy - forthcoming - Continental Philosophy Review:1-16.
    In this study I argue that Husserl’s phenomenology is compatible with a realistic interpretation of scientific theories. That said, I distinguish between the realistic interpretation of scientific theories and scientific realism. The former holds that the theoretical terms of a scientific theory are intended to refer, and that if we have good reason to believe that a scientific theory is true then we also have good reason to believe the entities it refers to exist. Scientific realism holds that the world (...)
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  3. Brentano's Conception of Philosophy as Rigorous Science.Wolfgang Huemer - forthcoming - Brentano Studien 16 (1).
    Abstract: Brentano’s conception of scientific philosophy had a strong influence on his students and on the intellectual atmosphere of Vienna in the late nineteenth century. The aim of this article is to expose Brentano’s conception and to contrast his views with that of two traditions he is said to have considerably influenced: phenomenology and analytic philosophy. I will shed light on the question of how and to what extent Brentano’s conception of philosophy as a rigorous science has had an impact (...)
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  4. Husserl. La phénoménologie et les fondements des sciences.Dominique Pradelle & Julien Farges (eds.) - forthcoming - Paris, France: Hermann.
    Le programme d’une fondation des sciences fit l’objet d’un intérêt constant de la part de Husserl, et a accompagné sa phénoménologie dans toutes les phases de son développement. Si les Prolégomènes à la logique pure confient la justification de la possibilité d’une théorie en général à l’idée d’une logique pure conçue comme « théorie pure des multiplicités », c’est au déploiement d’une ontologie matériale que revient la tâche de délimiter les domaines d’objets qui sont ceux des sciences positives effectives et (...)
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  5. Review of "Paulin Hountondji: African Philosophy as Critical Universalism" by Franziska Dübgen and Stefan Skupien. [REVIEW]Zeyad El Nabolsy - 2020 - Marx and Philosophy Review of Books 2020:1-7.
    Franziska Dübgen and Stefan Skupien have written a much needed overview of Paulin Hountondji’s work. While Hountondji is quite well known for his critique of ethnophilosophy, his later intellectual work on scientific dependency and his political writings are not as well known to non-specialist Anglophone readers. This partially stems from the fact that while his later work on scientific dependency has been translated into English, it has been published in the form of short articles or through transcribed interviews, which makes (...)
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  6. All Science as Rigorous Science: The Principle of Constructive Mathematizability of Any Theory.Vasil Penchev - 2020 - Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics eJournal 12 (12):1-15.
    A principle, according to which any scientific theory can be mathematized, is investigated. Social science, liberal arts, history, and philosophy are meant first of all. That kind of theory is presupposed to be a consistent text, which can be exhaustedly represented by a certain mathematical structure constructively. In thus used, the term “theory” includes all hypotheses as yet unconfirmed as already rejected. The investigation of the sketch of a possible proof of the principle demonstrates that it should be accepted rather (...)
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  7. Outlines for a Phenomenological Foundation For de Ronde's Theory of Powers and Potentia.Matías Graffigna - 2019 - In Christian de Ronde, Diederik Aerts, M. L. Dalla Chiara & Décio Krause (eds.), Probing the Meaning of Quantum Mechanics. Singapore: World Scientific. pp. 159-183.
    Starting with the claim that Quantum Mechanics is in need of a new interpretation that would allow us to understand the phenomena of this realm, I wish to analyse in this paper de Ronde's theory of power and potentia from a phenomenological perspective. De Ronde's claim is that the reason for the lack of success in the foundations of QM is due to the reluctance of both physicists and philosophers to explore the possibility of finding a new ontology, new concepts (...)
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  8. On the Origins of Scientific Objectivity.Mirja Hartimo - 2019 - In F. Kjosavik, C. Beyer & C. Fricke (eds.), Husserl’s Phenomenology of Intersubjectivity : Historical Interpretations and Contemporary Applications. pp. 302-321.
  9. Transcendental Idealism and Material Reality: Metaphysics of Scientific Objectivity in Husserl, Deleuze, and Kant.Bilge Akbalik - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Memphis
    This dissertation engages critically with the metaphysical implications of the respective transcendentalisms of Husserl, Deleuze, and Kant in an attempt to disclose their largely untapped resources for a renewed consideration of the ability of science to grasp reality as it is in-itself. Chapter 1 examines the metaphysical implications of Husserl’s critique of natural scientific objectivity in his later transcendental philosophy in connection to his early formulations of phenomenological objectivity around the axis of the distinction between metaphysics as the science of (...)
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  10. Crisis, Biology, Ecology: A New Starting-Point for Phenomenology?Ian Angus - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 49 (4):267-279.
    ABSTRACTThe crisis of European sciences in Husserl’s late work diagnoses Galilean science as specifically and necessarily losing touch with the intuitive evidence that would legitimate it due to its reliance on a formal-mathematical conceptual apparatus. While the vast majority of Husserl’s late work was focussed on a critique of the formal-mathematical paradigm of the physical science of nature, at several points the possibility of biology as the exemplary science is raised to suggest that the lack of a reliance on formal-mathematical (...)
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  11. Phänomenologie Als Platonismus: Zu den Platonischen Wesensmomenten der Philosophie Edmund Husserls.Thomas Arnold - 2017 - De Gruyter.
  12. Transcendental Phenomenology and Unobservable Entities.Philipp Berghofer - 2017 - Perspectives 7 (1):1-13.
    Can phenomenologists allow for the existence of unobservable entities such as atoms, electrons, and quarks? Can we justifiably believe in the existence of entities that are in principle unobservable? This paper addresses the relationship between Husserlian transcendental phenomenology and scientific realism. More precisely, the focus is on the question of whether there are basic epistemological principles phenomenologists are committed to that have anti-realist consequences with respect to unobservable entities. This question is relevant since Husserl’s basic epistemological principles, such as the (...)
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  13. Mechanics Lost: Husserl’s Galileo and Ihde’s Telescope.Harald A. Wiltsche - 2017 - Husserl Studies 33 (2):149-173.
    Don Ihde has recently launched a sweeping attack against Husserl’s late philosophy of science. Ihde takes particular exception to Husserl’s portrayal of Galileo and to the results Husserl draws from his understanding of Galilean science. Ihde’s main point is that Husserl paints an overly intellectualistic picture of the “father of modern science”, neglecting Galileo’s engagement with scientific instruments such as, most notably, the telescope. According to Ihde, this omission is not merely a historiographical shortcoming. On Ihde’s view, it is only (...)
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  14. Affect as Transcendental Condition of Activity Vs. Passivity, and of Natural Science.David Morris - 2016 - In Jack Reynolds & Ricky Seybold (eds.), Phenomenology and Science. New York, NY, USA: pp. 103-119.
    The distinction between activity and passivity has a deep and fundamental role in scientific and philosophical conceptual frameworks, going back to ancient Greek thinking about society and nature. I briefly indicate the importance of the activity-passivity distinction in the phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty, in relation to Husserl. I then advance a transcendental phenomenological argument that the distinction is, however, not as simple or obvious as it might appear, specifically that it cannot be wholly and determinately defined via a purely abstract, conceptual-discursive (...)
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  15. Fenomenologiczne ujęcie podmiotowości a kryzys człowieczeństwa.Agnieszka Wesołowska - 2016 - Studia Z Historii Filozofii 7 (3):73-87.
    Celem artykułu jest pokazanie, że Husserlowska diagnoza kryzysu, szczególnie kryzysu nauki wiąże się z konsekwencjami prowadzącymi do kryzysu europejskiego człowieczeństwa. Kryzys człowieczeństwa jest stałym motywem Husserlowskiej filozofii i polega zapoznaniu kwintesencji podmiotowości, jaką jest jej transcendentalny charakter. W związku z ideą kryzysu człowieczeństwa Husserl ukazuje, że nauki trwają w zaślepieniu, skutkującym utratą ich odniesieniu do życia, co powoduje ogólny kryzys. Możliwość przezwyciężenia kryzysu oznacza zwalczenie przesądów oraz wymaga przeprowadzenia autentycznej analizy świadomości jako zadania, któremu ma sprostać fenomenologiczna filozofia. Problem kryzysu (...)
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  16. Ethical Determination of Professional Scientific Activities in Phenomenology of Edmund Husserl.Віктор Левченко - 2015 - Докса 2.
    Some aspects of professional activity of the scientist presented in ethical works of E. Husserl are considered in this article. Responsibility to reason and consequences of scientific activity before civilization come to light as the ethical center of the phenomenological doctrine of Husserl. The author demonstrates that the aspect of formal following to the chosen norms and values, especially within his professional activity is very important for Husserl. The German phenomenologist selects various laws such as absorption and summaring defining standards (...)
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  17. Phenomenology, Naturalism and the Sense of Reality.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:67-88.
    Phenomenologists such as Husserl, Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty reject the kind of scientific naturalism or that takes empirical science to be epistemologically and metaphysically privileged over all other forms of enquiry. In this paper, I will consider one of their principal complaints against naturalism, that scientific accounts of things are oblivious to a that is presupposed by the intelligibility of science. Focusing mostly upon Husserl's work, I attempt to clarify the nature of this complaint and state it in the form of (...)
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  18. Husserl’s Philosophy of Science.Jarosław Rolewski - 2013 - Dialogue and Universalism 23 (2):145-160.
    The paper presents Husserl’s conception of the relation between science and the living world, i.e. the world of everyday experience and communication. In Husserl view, science, or, more precisely, its basic aprioric structure is founded on the primal, essential core of the living world from which it obtains its sense. Science modifies, idealizes, and mathematizes the primal aprioric Lebenswelt. Due to those operations scientific theories can represent empirical reality.
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  19. Science and Life-World: Husserl, Schutz, Garfinkel. [REVIEW]Lucia Ruggerone - 2013 - Human Studies 36 (2):179-197.
    In this article I intend to explore the conception of science as it emerges from the work of Husserl, Schutz, and Garfinkel. By concentrating specifically on the issue of science, I attempt to show that Garfinkel’s views on the relationship between science and the everyday world are much closer to Husserl’s stance than to the Schutzian perspective. To this end, I explore Husserl’s notion of science especially as it emerges in the Crisis of European Sciences, where he describes the failure (...)
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  20. Concept Formation and Scientific Objectivity: Weyl’s Turn Against Husserl.Iulian D. Toader - 2013 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (2):281-305.
    This paper argues that Weyl's view that scientific objectivity requires that concepts be freely created, i.e., introduced via Hilbert-style axiomatizations, led him to abandon the phenomenological view of objectivity.
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  21. Husserl’s Conception of Physical Theories and Physical Geometry in the Time of the Prolegomena: A Comparison with Duhem’s and Poincaré’s Views. [REVIEW]Guillermo E. Rosado Haddock - 2012 - Axiomathes 22 (1):171-193.
    This paper discusses Husserl’s views on physical theories in the first volume of his Logical Investigations , and compares them with those of his contemporaries Pierre Duhem and Henri Poincaré. Poincaré’s views serve as a bridge to a discussion of Husserl’s almost unknown views on physical geometry from about 1890 on, which in comparison even with Poincaré’s—not to say Frege’s—or almost any other philosopher of his time, represented a rupture with the philosophical tradition and were much more in tune with (...)
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  22. What is Wrong with Husserl's Scientific Anti-Realism?Harald A. Wiltsche - 2012 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 55 (2):105-130.
    Abstract Not much scholarly work is needed in order to stumble across many passages where Edmund Husserl seems to advocate an anti-realist attitude towards the natural sciences. This tendency, however, is not well-received within the secondary literature. While some commentators criticize Husserl for his alleged scientific anti-realism, others argue that Husserl's position is much more realist than the first impression indicates. It is against this background that I want to argue for the following theses: a) The basic outlook of Husserl's (...)
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  23. Animated Bodies in Immunological Practices: Craftsmanship, Embodied Knowledge, Emotions and Attitudes Toward Animals.Daniel Bischur - 2011 - Human Studies 34 (4):407-429.
    Taking up the body turn in sociology, this paper discusses scientific practices as embodied action from the perspective of Husserl’s phenomenological theory of the “Body”. Based on ethnographic data on a biology laboratory it will discuss the importance of the scientist’s Body for the performance of scientific activities. Successful researchers have to be skilled workers using their embodied knowledge for the process of tinkering towards the material transformation of their objects for data production. The researcher’s body then is an instrument (...)
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  24. Husserl’s Galileo Needed a Telescope!Don Ihde - 2011 - Philosophy and Technology 24 (1):69-82.
    Husserl’s Crisis argues that early modern science, exemplified in Galileo, separates the Lifeworld from a world of science by forgetting its origins in bodily perception on the one side, and the practices which found the science on the other. This essay argues that, rather, by overemphasizing mathematization and underemphasizing instruments or technologies which mediate perception, Husserl creates the division he describes. Positively, through the embodied use of instruments science remains thoroughly immersed in the Lifeworld.
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  25. Husserl and the Phenomenology of Science.Jeff Kochan - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (3):467-471.
    This article critically reviews an outstanding collection of new essays addressing Edmund Husserl’s Crisis of European Sciences. In Science and the Life-World (Stanford, 2010), David Hyder and Hans-Jörg Rheinberger bring together an impressive range of first-rate philosophers and historians. The collection explicates key concepts in Husserl’s often obscure work, compares Husserl’s phenomenology of science to the parallel tradition of historical epistemology, and provocatively challenges Husserl’s views on science. The explications are uniformly clear and helpful, the comparative work intriguing, and the (...)
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  26. Philosophy of Science.Jeff Kochan & Hans Bernhard Schmid - 2011 - In Sebastian Luft & Søren Overgaard (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Phenomenology.
    This chapter briefly summarises work by four key figures in the phenomenological philosophy of science: Edmund Husserl; Martin Heidegger; Patrick Heelan; and Joseph J. Kockelmans. In addition, some comparison is made with well-known figures in mainstream philosophy of science, and suggestions are given for further readings in the phenomenological philosophy of science.
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  27. Facts and Time in Quantum Mechanics: A Study in Phenomenology and Pragmatics.Michel Bitbol - 2010 - Manuscrito 33 (1):73-121.
    The concept of well-defined and mutually exclusive objective facts has no counterpart in the formalism of standard quantum mechanics. Bypassing decoherence theories, we then inquire into the conditions of use of this concept of objective fact, and find that it is grounded on the possibility of making reference to spatio-temporal continuants and permanent properties. Since these conditions are not fulfilled within the quantum paradigm, one must look for appropriate substitutes. Two such substitutes are discussed. The first one is phenomenal fact (...)
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  28. Vie, science de la vie et monde de la vie : Sur le statut de la biologie chez le dernier Husserl.Julien Farges - 2010 - Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique (2: La nature vivante (Actes n° 2).
    Dans son étude intitulée « Aspects du vitalisme », Georges Cangui­lhem se plaît à rappeler les dangers de l?indistinction des frontières entre le savoir biologique et la spéculation philosophique, soit que la philosophie reprenne à son compte une partie du savoir biologique positif ou de la conceptualité biologique, soit que la biologie prétende s?élever, à partir de son savoir et de ses concepts, à des considérations d?ordre philosophique 1 . Canguilhem écrit ainsi, tout d?abord à propos du philosophe : Il (...)
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  29. Philosophy, Phenomenology, Sciences. Essays in Commemoration of Edmund Husserl.Carlo Ierna, Filip Mattens & Hanne Jacobs (eds.) - 2010 - Springer.
    This volume is a broad anthology addressing many if not most major topics in phenomenology and philosophy in general: from foundational and methodological ...
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  30. Husserl contra Carnap: la démarcation des sciences.D. Pradelle - 2010 - In Carlo Ierna, Hanne Jaccobs & Filip Mattens (eds.), PHILOSOPHY PHENOMENOLOGY SCIENCES. Springer. pp. 157--189.
  31. Erde und Leib: Ort der Ökologie nach Husserl.Hans Rainer Sepp - 2010 - In Carlo Ierna, Hanne Jaccobs & Filip Mattens (eds.), PHILOSOPHY PHENOMENOLOGY SCIENCES. Springer.
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  32. A Solution to the ‘Paradoxical’ Relation Between Lifeworld and Science in Husserl.Panos Theodorou - 2010 - Phänomenologische Forschungen 2010.
    In this paper I deal with the problem of how Husserl can coherently claim that life-world is both (1) the founding presupposition of science and (2) a whole that has science as its part. The approach suggested here is based on Husserl's ideas regarding multi-layered transcenden tal intentional constitution of correlative noemata. In our intentional correlations we experi ence objectities in their appropriate horizons of co-givenness. Both the objectifies and their horizons are multi-layered structures containing a core of primordial, perceptual, (...)
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  33. The Role of Umwelt in Husserl’s Aufbau and Abbau of the Natur/Geist Distinction.Adam Konopka - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (3):313 - 333.
    In this essay I argue that Husserl’s development of the nineteenth century Natur/Geist distinction is grounded in the intentional correlate between the pre-theoretical natural attitude and environing world ( Umwelt ). By reconsidering the Natur/Geist distinction through its historical context in the nineteenth century debate between Wilhelm Dilthey and the Neo-Kantians from the Baden or Southwest school, it is possible to understand more clearly Husserl’s appropriations and novel contributions. One of Husserl’s contributions lies in his rigorous thematization and clarification of (...)
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  34. Charting the Future Course for a Truly Humanistic Science: Husserl, the Epoche, and the Life-World.Brian Lightbody - 2009 - Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism (A Journal of the American Humanist Association) 17 (1):61-71.
  35. Edmund Husserl and the Limitations of Biorobotic Research1.Matthew Morgan - 2009 - Philosophical Forum 40 (3):411-424.
  36. The Pregnancy of the Real: A Phenomenological Defense of Experimental Realism.Shannon Vallor - 2009 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 52 (1):1 – 25.
    This paper develops a phenomenological defense of Ian Hacking's experimental realism about unobservable entities in physical science, employing historically undervalued resources from the phenomenological tradition in order to clarify the warrant for our ontological commitments in science. Building upon the work of Husserl, Merleau-Ponty and Heelan, the paper provides a phenomenological correction of the positivistic conception of perceptual evidence maintained by antirealists such as van Fraassen, the experimental relevance of which is illustrated through a phenomenological interpretation of the 1974 discovery (...)
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  37. The Double Meanings of “Essence”: The Natural and Humane Sciences — a Tentative Linkage of Hegel, Dilthey, and Husserl. [REVIEW]Shiying Zhang - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):143-155.
    Early in Aristotle’s terminology, and ever since, “essence” has been conceived as having two meanings, namely “universality” and “individuality”. According to the tradition of thought that has dominated throughout the history of Western philosophy, “essence” unequivocally refers to “universality”. As a matter of fact, however, “universality” cannot cover Aristotle’s definition and formulation of “essence”: Essence is what makes a thing “happen to be this thing.” “Individuality” should be the deep meaning of “essence”. By means of an analysis of some relevant (...)
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  38. Revision of Phenomenology for Mathematical Physics.Masaki Hrada - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 43:73-80.
    Fundamental notions Husserl introduced in Ideen I, such as epochè, reality, and empty X as substrate, might be useful for elucidating how mathematical physics concepts are produced. However, this is obscured in the context of Husserl’s phenomenology itself. For this possibility, the author modifies Husserl’s fundamental notions introduced for pure phenomenology, which found all sciences on the absolute Ego. Subsequently, the author displaces Husserl's phenomenological notions toward the notions operating inside scientific activities themselves and shows this using a case study (...)
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  39. A Renewal of Husserl’s Critique of Naturalism.Adam Konopka - 2008 - Environmental Philosophy 5 (1):37-59.
    This essay argues that phenomenology is uniquely suited to critique naturalism without lapsing into a romantic, anti-scientific, or dystopian view of modern science. This argument situates Husserl’s retrieval of the environmental relation in the Vienna Lecture between two alternative tendencies in contemporary ecological phenomenology: 1) the rejection of or indifference to the positive sciences, and 2) the adoption of naturalism in phenomenological methodology. On the one hand, the claim is that the phenomenological return to the environment should not imply a (...)
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  40. Understanding Quantum Mechanics with Bohr and Husserl.François Lurçat - 2007 - In Luciano Boi, Pierre Kerszberg & Frédéric Patras (eds.), Rediscovering Phenomenology: Phenomenological Essays on Mathematical Beings, Physical Reality, Perception and Consciousness (Phaenomenologica) (English and French Edition). Springer. pp. 229-258.
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  41. The Husserlian Lebenswelt and the Semantic Conception of Theories.Raúl Milone - 2007 - Ideas Y Valores 56 (135):85-94.
    This article establishes some important similarities between Husserl’sthoughts about the nature of science and the semantic view of scientific theories. This last conception affirms that empirical theories do not describe the world as it is, but that they idealize and represent it using structural models. In this sense and prima facie, the semantic conception coincides with Husserl’s point of view regarding the life-world and the world of science.
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  42. Mathematizing Phenomenology.Jeffrey Yoshimi - 2007 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (3):271-291.
    Husserl is well known for his critique of the “mathematizing tendencies” of modern science, and is particularly emphatic that mathematics and phenomenology are distinct and in some sense incompatible. But Husserl himself uses mathematical methods in phenomenology. In the first half of the paper I give a detailed analysis of this tension, showing how those Husserlian doctrines which seem to speak against application of mathematics to phenomenology do not in fact do so. In the second half of the paper I (...)
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  43. La matematizzazione dei plena. Un esempio di analisi fenomenologica.Guido Caniglia - 2006 - Annali Del Dipartimento di Filosofia 12:119-144.
    Plena are the characteristic properties of material thing, of the thing we perceive in our daily experience. According to Husserl, the attempt to explain their features into the language of Physics is the core of the modern science of nature. Colours and smells are not directly reducible to geometrical forms and algebraic functions. In order to explain natural processes using mathematical terms, scientists need to find out how it is possible to measure them. Galileo claims that the world is made (...)
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  44. Edmund Husserl on the Applicability of Formal Geometry.René Jagnow - 2006 - In Emily Carson & Renate Huber (eds.), Intuition and the Axiomatic Method. Springer. pp. 67-85.
    In this paper, I reconstruct Edmund Husserl's view on the relationship between formal inquiry and the life-world, using the example of formal geometry. I first outline Husserl's account of geometry and then argue that he believed that the applicability of formal geometry to intuitive space (the space of everyday-experience) guarantees the conceptual continuity between different notions of space.
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  45. Husserl’s Argumentation for the Pre-Copernican View of the Earth.Juha Himanka - 2005 - Review of Metaphysics 58 (3):621 - 644.
    Edmund Husserl’s Nachlass includes a text enclosed in an envelope on which is written: “Overthrow of the Copernican theory in usual interpretation of a world view. The original ark, earth, does not move.” This text was chosen to be one of the first posthumous publications of Husserl. The editor, however, chose to use a less controversial title: “Foundational Investigations of the Phenomenological Origin of the Spatiality of Nature.” The title nevertheless does not change the radicality of the text itself; it (...)
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  46. Krisis der Wissenschaftlichen Kultur? Edmund Husserls Forderung nach „Besinnung".Christian Möckel - 2005 - Cultura 2 (2):26-39.
    Phenomenological philosophizing is practiced out of a sense of responsibility for contemporary culture, which is experienced as existing in a profoundcrisis. The first part of this contribution contains a systematization of the theory of crisis, a theory developed in many of Husserl's works: the description of the main phenomena of the consciousness of crisis, the explanation of crisis with regard to its causes, and the demands raised in order to overcome the crisis of scientific culture (»reflection«). Husserl's teachings on crisis (...)
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  47. Goethe, Husserl, and the Crisis of the European Sciences.Eva-Maria Simms - 2005 - Janus Head 8 (1):160-172.
    Goethe belongs to the phenomenological tradition for a number of reasons: He shared Husserl’s deep mistrust of the mathematization of the natural world and the ensuing loss of the qualitative dimension of human existence; he understood that the phenomenological observer must free him/herself from sedimented cultural prejudices, a process which Husserl called the epoche; he experienced and articulated the new and surprising fullness of the world as it reveals itself to the patient and participatory phenomenological observer. Goethe’s phenomenological sensibilities and (...)
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  48. Husserl, Lonergan, and Paradoxes of Measurement.Patrick A. Heelan - 2003 - Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 3:76-96.
    My scientific field is theoretical physics. My philosophical orientation is phenomenology, especially hermeneutical phenomenology, as modified and extended under the influence of Bernard Lonergan's cognitional theory. In fact, I was already deeply under the influence of Bernard Lonergan's workbefore I went to Louvain/Leuven to study phenomenology as a propaedeutic to my preparation in the philosophy of science. The specific topic of this paper is one close to the center of Philip's interest, namely, to articulate the right balance among theory, experiment, (...)
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  49. Crisis, History, and Husserl’s Phenomenological Project of Desedimenting the Formalization of Meaning: Jacob Klein’s Contribution.Burt C. Hopkins - 2003 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 24 (1):75-102.
    Two of Husserl’s most important, though fragmentary texts from the final phase of his thought, The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology and “The Origin of Geometry as an Intentional-Historical Problem,” focus on the themes of history and the life-world. It is well known that prior to these works Husserl sought to establish transcendental phenomenology as both a factually and an historically pure eidetic science. Thus the interpreter of the whole of Husserl’s thought is faced with the question of (...)
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  50. Foucault, Cavaillès, and Husserl on the Historical Epistemology of the Sciences.David Hyder - 2003 - Perspectives on Science 11 (1):107-129.
    : This paper discusses the origins of two key notions in Foucault's work up to and including The Archaeology of Knowledge. The first of these notions is the notion of "archaeology" itself, a form of historical investigation of knowledge that is distinguished from the mere history of ideas in part by its unearthing what Foucault calls "historical a prioris". Both notions, I argue, are derived from Husserlian phenomenology. But both are modified by Foucault in the light of Jean Cavaillès's critique (...)
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