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  1. On What Matters. Personal Identity as a Phenomenological Problem.Steven Crowell - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 20 (2):261-279.
    This paper focuses on the connection between meaning, the specific field of phenomenological philosophy, and mattering, the cornerstone of personal identity. Doing so requires that we take a stand on the scope and method of phenomenological philosophy itself. I will argue that while we can describe our lives in an “impersonal” way, such descriptions will necessarily omit what makes it the case that such lives can matter at all. This will require distinguishing between “personal” identity and “self” identity, an idea (...)
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  2. Husserl, the Active Self, and Commitment.Hanne Jacobs - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 20 (2):281-298.
    In “On what matters: Personal identity as a phenomenological problem”, Steven Crowell engages a number of contemporary interpretations of Husserl’s account of the person and personal identity by noting that they lack a phenomenological elucidation of the self as commitment. In this article, in response to Crowell, I aim to show that such an account of the self as commitment can be drawn from Husserl’s work by looking more closely at his descriptions from the time of Ideas and after of (...)
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  3. The Question of Violence Between the Transcendental and the Empirical Field: The Case of Husserl’s Philosophy.Remus Breazu - 2020 - Human Studies 43 (2):159-170.
    In this article, I address the question of violence with respect to the phenomenological difference between the transcendental and the empirical field. In the first part, I phenomenologically address the notion of violence, developing a concept required for an account of the phenomenon of violence. Thus, I correlate it with the notion of vulnerability, arguing that violence cannot be understood irrespective of vulnerability. However, a proper phenomenological account has to indicate the subjective conditions of possibility of a phenomenon as it (...)
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  4. Ego-Splitting and the Transcendental Subject. Kant’s Original Insight and Husserl’s Reappraisal.Marco Cavallaro - 2020 - In Iulian Apostolescu (ed.), The Subject of Phenomenology. Rereading Husserl. Springer. pp. 107-133.
    In this paper, I contend that there are at least two essential traits that commonly define being an I: self-identity and self-consciousness. I argue that they bear quite an odd relation to each other in the sense that self-consciousness seems to jeopardize self-identity. My main concern is to elucidate this issue within the range of the transcendental philosophies of Immanuel Kant and Edmund Husserl. In the first section, I shall briefly consider Kant’s own rendition of the problem of the Ego-splitting. (...)
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  5. “Self-Variation”: A Problem of Method in Husserl’s Phenomenology.Daniele De Santis - 2020 - Husserl Studies 36 (3):255-269.
    This paper aims at offering a concise, yet systematic, presentation of the Husserlian method of “self-variation” in connection to eidetic variation sic et simpliciter. After a brief review of the different meanings of this method in Husserl’s writings, I will focus on the way in which Husserl employs it to bring the eidos “ego” to the fore. To this end, I will take into account the specific subject matter of self-variation by resorting to a twofold concept of essence as well (...)
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  6. The Embodied Self and the Paradox of Subjectivity.Christoph Durt - 2020 - Husserl Studies 36 (1):69-85.
    While it seems obvious that the embodied self is both a subject of experience and an object in the world, it is not clear how, or even whether, both of these senses of self can refer to the same self. According to Husserl, the relation between these two senses of self is beset by the “paradox of human subjectivity.” Following Husserl’s lead, scholars have attempted to resolve the paradox of subjectivity. This paper categorizes the different formulations of the paradox according (...)
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  7. Some Observations on Shankara, Husserl and the Transcendental Ego.Pramod Kumar Singh - 2020 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 37 (2):257-264.
    This paper is an attempt to see the similarity between the Shankara’s notion of Ätman and Husserl’s Transcendental Ego. Both thinkers, Husserl and Shankara trace true knowledge to the transcendental self. The former describes the self as the embodiment of absolute knowledge that transcends the limitations of the body, the senses and the intellect. In the state of bondage and ignorance, this Transcendental Ego is oblivious of its ontological and cognitive priority or transcendence and seeks knowledge in the natural world (...)
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  8. Synthesis and Transcendental Ego: A Comparison of Kant and Husserl.Saurabh Todariya - 2020 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 37 (2):265-277.
    The paper deals with the notion of synthesis and transcendental ego in Kant and Husserl. It will argue that the actual difference between Kant and Husserl’s notion of transcendental ego can be understood through their conception of time. Kant accepts transcendental ego as the kind of logical necessity for synthesizing the various temporal units which provides unity to the consciousness. However, Husserl discards the necessity of transcendental ego by giving the phenomenological interpretation of time as internal time consciousness. The interpretation (...)
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  9. Sartre’s Critique of Husserl.Jonathan Webber - 2020 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (1):155-176.
    This paper articulates a new understanding of Sartre’s philosophical methodology in his early publications up to and including Being and Nothingness. Through his critique of Husserl across these works, Sartre develops an original and sophisticated variety of transcendental phenomenology. He was attracted to Husserl’s philosophy for its promise to establish the foundations of empirical psychology but ultimately concluded that it could not fulfil this promise. Through the analyses that led him to this conclusion, Sartre formulated a new kind of phenomenological (...)
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  10. The Phenomenology of the Pure Ego and Its Dialectical Actuality.Andrea Altobrando - 2019 - In Danilo Manca, Elisa Magrì, Dermot Moran & Alfredo Ferrarin (eds.), Hegel and Phenomenology. Springer Verlag. pp. 93-114.
    The notion of the “pure ego” is an expression which seems to have long been discredited. Even before the twentieth century – in the work of Hume, for instance – the idea that there is a pure pole of experience, and life, has been considered to be nothing more than a myth. More recently, criticism of the pure ego has often been made along the same lines as the criticism against the Cartesian self. That is to say, both have been (...)
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  11. Between Minimal Self and Narrative Self: A Husserlian Analysis of Person.Jaakko Belt - 2019 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (4):305-323.
    ABSTRACTThe distinction between minimal self and narrative self has gained ground in recent discussions of selfhood. In this article, this distinction is reassessed by analysing Zahavi and Gallagher’s account of selfhood and supplementing it with Husserl’s concept of person. I argue that Zahavi and Gallagher offer two compatible and complementary notions of self. Nevertheless, the relationship between minimal self and narrative self requires further clarification. Especially the embeddedness of self, the interplay between passivity and activity, and the problems of uniqueness (...)
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  12. From the Embodied Self to the Embodied Person.Francesca Forlè - 2019 - Humana Mente 12 (36).
    In this paper, I will focus on the process of constitution of oneself as an embodied being and, more precisely, on the specific way in which one can experience oneself not just as an embodied self, but rather as the actual embodied person he/she is. I will start by describing the most basic way in which our embodied self is constituted, that is as a felt-feeling body and as the zero-point of orientation of all our sensations and perceptions. Then, I (...)
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  13. We-Synthesis.Joseph Rivera - 2019 - Research in Phenomenology 49 (2):183-206.
    The purpose of this paper is threefold: To show the basic contours of transcendental subjectivity in the later work of Edmund Husserl, especially the Cartesian Meditations and the Crisis, and in the strictly phenomenological work of Michel Henry, especially Material Phenomenology; to highlight Henry’s radical critique of Husserlian intersubjectivity and show that such critique, while valuable in its intention, is ultimately misguided because it neglects the important contribution Husserl’s complicated vocabulary of lifeworld makes to the study of intersubjectivity; and to (...)
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  14. Neither One Nor Many: Husserl on the Primal Mode of the I.Shigeru Taguchi - 2019 - In Shigeru Taguchi & Nicolas de Warren (eds.), New Phenomenological Studies in Japan. Springer Verlag. pp. 57-68.
    Husserl’s concept of “primal I” is well known but difficult to understand. In this chapter, I present a clue to figuring out what is at stake in this concept. First, I refer to Husserl’s claim that the primal I cannot be pluralized. This claim can be understood in the sense that this ego is neither one of many egos nor a single all-encompassing entity. Second, in order to show that this character of “neither-one-nor-many” is not anything extraordinary, I shall refer (...)
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  15. Towards a Husserlian Integrative Account of Experiential and Narrative Dimensions of the Self.Mette Vesterager - 2019 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 50 (2):162-188.
    The aim of this paper is to outline an integrative account of experiential and narrative dimensions of the self based on Husserl’s genetic phenomenology. I argue that we should discard “strong narrativism” which holds that our experiential life has a narrative structure and, accordingly, that experiential and narrative dimensions of the self coincide. We should also refrain from equating the experiential self with the minimal self, as the former does not simply constitute a formally individuated subject as the latter but (...)
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  16. Second-Person Engagement, Self-Alienation, and Group-Identification.Dan Zahavi - 2019 - Topoi 38 (1):251-260.
    One of the central questions within contemporary debates about collective intentionality concerns the notion and status of the we. The question, however, is by no means new. At the beginning of the last century, it was already intensively discussed in phenomenology. Whereas Heidegger argued that a focus on empathy is detrimental to a proper understanding of the we, and that the latter is more fundamental than any dyadic interaction, other phenomenologists, such as Stein, Walther and Husserl, insisted on the importance (...)
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  17. The Link Between Intersubjectivity and Self-Shaping in the Light of Phenomenological Philosophy.Bianca Bellini - 2018 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 9 (2):203-229.
    The paper aims to investigate the link between self-shaping and intersubjectivity from a phenomenological perspective. This means that two main topics are here at stake. On the one hand, the paper purports to argue that tackling the link between self-shaping and intersubjectivity from a phenomenological perspective is a meaningful and sound approach. On the other hand, the paper purports to argue that such an analysis enables us to bring to light an inherent linkage that tethers the topic of intersubjectivity to (...)
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  18. Time, or the Mediation of the Now: On Dan Zahavi’s “Irrelational” Account of Self-Temporalization.Matthew Coate - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (4):565-591.
    On Dan Zahavi’s Husserlian account of the subject, the self-temporalization of subjectivity presupposes what he calls an “immediate impressional self-manifestation.” It follows from this view that self-awareness is an inherent power of the one who will be subject, rather than a product of sociality introduced into life from without. In this paper, I argue against Zahavi’s position by going over the development of Husserl’s account of time-consciousness, examining the positions Husserl takes and the reasons that he comes to these positions. (...)
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  19. Who Is the Subject of Phenomenology? Husserl and Fink on the Transcendental Ego.D. J. Hobbs - 2018 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (2):154-169.
    ABSTRACTOne long-running conundrum in Husserlian phenomenology revolves around the question of the identity of what Husserl calls the transcendental ego, a mysterious figure that he identifies as the subject of a genuinely transcendental phenomenology. In dialogue with both Husserl and his assistant and collaborator Eugen Fink, I attempt in this article to give a solid account of the identity of this transcendental ego, and in particular to explain the connection between this figure and the empirical ego of the individual phenomenologist. (...)
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  20. Non-Contextual Self: Husserl and Nishida on the Primal Mode of the Self.Shigeru Taguchi - 2018 - In Andrea Altobrando, Takuya Niikawa & Richard Stone (eds.), The Realizations of the Self. Springer. pp. 31-46.
    It is obvious that in my experience, I cannot leave my own experience. Given that, how can I know that there are other perspectives than mine? In the present paper, I first approach this problem from the standpoint of Edmund Husserl’s phenomenology. Husserl seems to answer the question by his reflection on the “primal I”. I will analyze this strange but thought-provoking concept by interpreting it as a kind of “non-contextual self.” Second, I will compare the result of this consideration (...)
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  21. Husserl’s Unnoticed Contribution to Selfhood.Hubert Wykretowicz - 2018 - Constructivist Foundations 14 (1):30-32.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Decentering the Brain: Embodied Cognition and the Critique of Neurocentrism and Narrow-Minded Philosophy of Mind” by Shaun Gallagher.: Shaun Gallagher’s philosophical inquiries are well known, among other things, for a phenomenological theory of an embodied selfhood. However, I show here that Gallagher has not considered all the means that phenomenology has to offer on this issue.
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  22. Phänomenologie Als Platonismus: Zu den Platonischen Wesensmomenten der Philosophie Edmund Husserls.Thomas Arnold - 2017 - De Gruyter.
  23. Hegel and Husserl on the Emergence of the I Out of Subjectivity.Alfredo Ferrarin - 2017 - Hegel Bulletin 38 (1):7-23.
  24. Mead and Husserl on the Self and Identification of the Subject.Alexei Krioukov - 2017 - Vestnik SPbSU. Philosophy and Conflict Studies 33 (4):477-489.
  25. Jaspers, Husserl, Kant: Boundary Situations as a " Turning Point".Gladys L. Portuondo - 2017 - Existenz 11 (1):51-56.
    Abstract: The essay addresses the meaning of boundary situations in the philosophy of Karl Jaspers, as a turning point drawing on Edmund Husserl's phenomenology and Immanuel Kant's transcendental philosophy, and as a key for the comprehension of some of the differences in Karl Jaspers' philosophy regarding the thought of Husserl and Kant, respectively. For Jaspers, the meaning of boundary situations as a structure of Existenz underlines the possibility of risk in the individual historicity. Taking risks breaks the flow of reflection (...)
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  26. Der Spannungsbogen von Autonomie und Verletzlichkeit. Eine phänomenologisch-anthropologische Reflexion/ The Unsolved Tension between Autonomy and Vulnerability.Alice Pugliese - 2017 - Gestalt Theory 39 (2-3):349-364.
    A phenomenological approach to anthropology should not propose a static definition of man, but inquire into specific human motivations, which never occur isolated. Therefore, the autonomy-dependency connection is presented as a possible human motivational ground. The notion of autonomy, presented with reference to the Kantian idea of the self-determining reason and to the Husserlian account of self-constitution, reveals in itself elements of dependency. On the other side, the notion of vulnerability and reliance is displayed through different approaches of Gehlen, MacIntyre (...)
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  27. Act Psychology and Phenomenology: Husserl on Egoic Acts.Benjamin Sheredos - 2017 - Husserl Studies 33 (3):191-209.
    Husserl famously retracted his early portrayal, in Logische Untersuchungen, of phenomenology as empirical psychology. Previous scholarship has typically understood this transcendental turn in light of the Ideen’s revised conception of the ἐποχή, and its distinction between noesa and noemata. This essay thematizes the evolution of the concept of mental acts in Husserl’s work as a way of understanding the shift. I show how the recognition of the pure ego in Ideen I and II enabled Husserl to radically alter his conception (...)
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  28. Sartre’s Transcendental Phenomenology.Jonathan Webber - 2017 - In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the History of Phenomenology. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press.
    The first phase of Sartre’s philosophical publications is marked by an apparent ambivalence towards Husserl’s transcendental turn. Sartre accepts both major aspects of that turn, the phenomenological reduction and the use of transcendental argumentation. Yet his rejection of the transcendental ego that Husserl derives from this transcendental turn overlooks an obvious transcendental argument in favour of it. His books on emotion and imagination, moreover, make only very brief comments about the transcendental constitution of the world of experience. In each case, (...)
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  29. Some Reflections on Time and the Ego in Husserl’s Late Texts on Time-Consciousness.John B. Brough - 2016 - Quaestiones Disputatae 7 (1):89-108.
    Time-consciousness made its appearance in Husserl’s thought in the first decade of the twentieth century in analyses that were notably silent on the issue of the ego. The ego itself made its debut in the Ideas in 1913, but without an account of its relationship to time. Husserl described time-consciousness, particularly what he called the absolute time-constituting flow of consciousness, as perhaps the most important matter in all of phenomenology. He also came to view phenomenology as centered on the study (...)
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  30. Das „Problem“ der Habituskonstitution Und Die Spätlehre des Ich in der Genetischen Phänomenologie E. Husserls.Marco Cavallaro - 2016 - Husserl Studies 32 (3):237-261.
    Der vorliegende Aufsatz behandelt zwei Bereiche, deren Zusammenhang in der aktuellen Husserlforschung zu Unrecht in Vergessenheit geraten zu sein scheint: Zum einen konturiere ich den Habitusbegriff und das damit verbundene Problem der Habituskonstitution im Spätwerk E. Husserls. Zum anderen dient das Ergebnis dieser ersten Untersuchung dann als Grundlage für die Frage nach dem Wesen des Ich in der genetischen Phänomenologie. Die Untersuchung besteht aus drei Teilen: Zuerst stelle ich, um die Bedeutung des Begriffs „Habitus“ zu klären, Ingardens Interpretationsalternativen der Habituskonstitution (...)
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  31. Fenomenología, sentimientos e identidad. La contribución de la fenomenología husserliana de los sentimientos a la cuestión de la identidad personal.Mariano Crespo - 2016 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 33 (2):605-617.
    El artículo aborda la cuestión de la contribución de los sentimientos a la “conformación” y a la “revelación” de la identidad personal desde la perspectiva de la fenomenología husserliana. Para ello se parte de una breve descripción de qué entiende Edmund Husserl por “sentimientos” señalando el error de considerar esta esfera como una esfera homogénea. La distinción fundamental que cruza la misma es la existente entre sensaciones afectivas y actos afectivos. Manuscritos inéditos de Husserl a los que el autor ha (...)
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  32. O motivo ético do recurso à subjetividade transcendental.Marcelo Fabri - 2016 - Philósophos - Revista de Filosofia 21 (1):59-81.
    The paper aims to investigate the ethical motive which led Husserl to defend the transcendental subjectivity. The central thesis is that phenomenological attitude is more than a pure methodical and theoretical approach on human subjectivity. Husserlian’s use of the transcendental ego has a practical purpose. Considering that phenomenology always begins by the suspension of the natural attitude, the possibility of this suspension implicates a paradox: the ego must preserve his belief in reason and science in order to carry out the (...)
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  33. Suffering and Ipseity in Michel Henry: The Problem of the Ego’s Transcendental Identity.Jean-François Lavigne - 2016 - Analecta Hermeneutica 8.
    The double expansion that Husserl’s phenomenology imposed on subjective experience posed, among other difficulties, a new and particularly difficult problem for Husserl; that of the trans-temporal identity of the transcendental subject, the “ego.” This problem involves also, and still more fundamentally, the question of the ontological status of the ego. Beginning with his descriptivepsychological understanding of consciousness and its intentional acts in the 1901 Logical Investigations, Husserl had first identified the subjective ego with the empirical person, and considered it sufficient (...)
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  34. Intentionality, Consciousness, and the Ego: The Influence of Husserl’s Logical Investigations on Sartre’s Early Work.Lior Levy - 2016 - The European Legacy 21 (5-6):511-524.
    Jean-Paul Sartre’s early phenomenological texts reveal the complexity of his relationship to Edmund Husserl. Deeply indebted to phenomenology’s method as well as its substance, Sartre nonetheless confronted Husserl’s transcendental turn from Ideas onward. Although numerous studies have focused on Sartre’s points of contention with Husserl, drawing attention to his departure from Husserlian phenomenology, scholars have rarely examined the way in which Sartre engaged and responded to the early Husserl, particularly to his discussions of intentionality, consciousness, and self in Logical Investigations. (...)
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  35. Transcendental Anthropology. Formation of Sense, Personal I, and Self-Identity in Edmund Husserl and Their Reception in the Phenomenological Metaphysics of László Tengelyi.Bence Péter Marosán - 2016 - HORIZON. Studies in Phenomenology 5 (1):150-170.
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  36. The Community of Solitude.Christopher Pulte - 2016 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 16 (1-2):207-216.
    This paper re-examines the egos of Edmund Husserl and Max Scheler with reference to Friedrich Nietzsche and the psychologist, James Hillman, and in the process also confronts the ego in other of its many manifestations, misappropriations, and mystifications.The ego is a multi-headed enigma which defies phenomenological description, and only reaches the status of concept by virtue of the gropings of an epistemology which is not up to the task. The goal of this paper is twofold: firstly, to come to terms (...)
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  37. O problema da autoconstituição do eu transcendental na fenomenologia de Husserl: de Ideias I a Meditações Cartesianas.Carlos Diógenes Côrtes Tourinho - 2016 - Trans/Form/Ação 39 (3):87-100.
    RESUMO: O presente artigo aborda um tema específico da fenomenologia de Husserl: o problema da autoconstituição do eu transcendental. O artigo se encontra dividido em duas partes. Inicialmente, investiga o eu como polo idêntico que acompanha todos os vividos. Em seguida, introduz o problema da autoconstituição: ao constituir seus objetos, o eu transcendental se autoconstitui. Por fim, retoma o referido problema, para investigar a gênese temporal da vida subjetiva e a autoconstituição do ego por meio dos seus próprios habitus. ABSTRACT: (...)
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  38. Dan Zahavi: Self and Other: Exploring Subjectivity, Empathy, and Shame: Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2015, Hardcover: $49.95; £, ISBN: 9780199590681. [REVIEW]Philip J. Walsh - 2016 - Husserl Studies 32 (1):75-82.
  39. The Disinterested Spectator: Geiger’s and Husserl’s Place in the Debate on the Splitting of the Ego.Michele Averchi - 2015 - Studia Phaenomenologica 15:227-246.
    Moritz Geiger developed an original phenomenological account of the splitting of the Ego in two papers, written in 1911 and 1913. Husserl read the 1911 paper as he was working on preliminary manuscripts to Ideas I. The first part of Husserl’s comments focused precisely on the splitting of the Ego. In this paper I will answer three questions: What is the historical-philosophical context of Geiger’s and Husserl’s discussion on the splitting of the ego? What are the phenomenological features of the (...)
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  40. Against Unnecessary Duplication of Selves: A Sartrean Argument Against Zahavi.Simon Gusman - 2015 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 46 (4):323-335.
    In this article I argue that Zahavi's Sartre-inspired combination of the experiential and narrative self entails an unnecessary duplication of selves. Sartre himself accused Husserl of the same mistake in The Transcendence of the Ego. He claims that Husserl's combination of the transcendental I and the Me is unnecessary, and that we can do without the first. I try to show that Sartre's critique of Husserl also applies to Zahavi. Sartre's critique is based on his idea of impersonal consciousness, which (...)
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  41. Husserl’s Motivation and Method for Phenomenological Reconstruction.Matt Bower - 2014 - Continental Philosophy Review 47 (2):135-152.
    In this paper I piece present an account of Husserl’s approach to the phenomenological reconstruction of consciousness’ immemorial past, a problem, I suggest, that is quite pertinent for defenders of Lockean psychological continuity views of personal identity. To begin, I sketch the background of the problem facing the very project of a genetic phenomenology, within which the reconstructive analysis is situated. While the young Husserl took genetic matters to be irrelevant to the main task of phenomenology, he would later come (...)
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  42. From Nature to Spirit: Husserl's Phenomenology of the Person in Ideen II.Timothy Burns - 2014 - Perspectives: International Postgraduate Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):4-22.
    In this article, I explicate Husserl’s phenomenology of the person as found in Ideen II by examining the most important aspects of persons in this work. In the first section, I explicate the concept of the surrounding world (Umwelt) with special attention to the difference between the different attitudes (Einstellungen) that help determine the sense of constituted objects of experience. In the second section, I investigate Husserl’s description of the person as a founded, higher order, spiritual (geistig) objectivity. I consider (...)
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  43. Transcendental Subjectivity and the Human Being.Hanne Jacobs - 2014 - In Sara Heinämaa Mirja Hartimo & Timo Miettinen (eds.), Phenomenology and the Transcendental. Routledge. pp. 87-105.
    This article addresses an ambiguity in Edmund Husserl’s descriptions of what it means to be a human being in the world. On the one hand, Husserl often characterizes the human being in natural scientific terms as a psychophysical unity. On the other hand, Husserl also describes how we experience ourselves as embodied persons that experience and communicate with others within a socio-historical world. The main aim of this article is to show that if one overlooks this ambiguity then one will (...)
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  44. What Does Heidegger Mean by the Transcendence of Dasein?Dermot Moran - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (4):491-514.
    In this paper, I shall examine the evolution of Heidegger?s concept of?transcendence? as it appears in Being and Time,?On the Essence of Ground? and related texts from the late 1920s in relation to his rethinking of subjectivity and intentionality. Heidegger defines Being as?transcendence? in Being and Time and reinterprets intentionality in terms of the transcendence of Dasein. In the critical epistemological tradition of philosophy stemming from Kant, as in Husserl, transcendence and immanence are key notions. Indeed,?transcendence in immanence? is a (...)
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  45. Self and Other: Exploring Subjectivity, Empathy, and Shame.Dan Zahavi - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Dan Zahavi engages with classical phenomenology, philosophy of mind, and a range of empirical disciplines to explore the nature of selfhood. He argues that the most fundamental level of selfhood is not socially constructed or dependent upon others, but accepts that certain dimensions of the self and types of self-experience are other-mediated.
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  46. Le partage du monde: Husserl et la constitution des animaux comme "autres moi".Christiane Bailey - 2013 - Chiasmi International: Trilingual Studies Concerning Merleau-Ponty’s Thought 15:219-250.
    Alors que les phénoménologues prétendent avoir dépassé le solipsisme, la plupart n’ont en fait que repousser les frontières de l’intersubjectivité des individus humains aux individus des autres espèces. Pourtant, Husserl reconnaît l’existence d’une intersubjectivité interspécifique, c’est-à-dire d’une intersubjectivité dépassant les limites de l’espèce. Il va même jusqu’à affirmer qu’on comprend parfois mieux un animal familier qu’un humain étranger. Toutefois, même s’il admet que plusieurs animaux sont capables d’une vie de conscience subjective et qu’ils vivent dans un monde de sens partagé, (...)
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  47. Egos & Selves—From Husserl to Nagel.Brian T. Baldwin - 2013 - In Christer Svennerlind, Jan Almäng & Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (eds.), Johanssonian Investigations. Essays in Honour of Ingvar Johansson on His Seventieth Birthday. Ontos Verlag. pp. 5--53.
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  48. The Habitus Made Me Do It: Bourdieu's Key Concept as a Substruction of the Monad.Carlos Belvedere - 2013 - Philosophy Study 3 (12).
    My claim is that Bourdieu’s concept of habitus is not consistent and its ambiguities conceal an imprecision concerning the subject of social action. Indeed, Bourdieu defines habitus in three different ways: as a capacity, as a set of dispositions, and as a scheme for practice. That is why he cannot solve the problem of the duality of agent and habitus and produces a problem of fundamentation, as we can see in his troubles to determine which is the substratum of social (...)
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  49. The Phenomenology of Body and Self In Dietrich von Hildebrand and Edmund Husserl.Ann-Therese Gardner - 2013 - Quaestiones Disputatae 3 (2):28-36.
  50. Fiction in Edith Stein's Idea of Empathy.Fernando Infante Del Rosal - 2013 - Ideas Y Valores 62 (153):137-155.
    RESUMEN En su primera investigación, Edith Stein se propuso definir la esencia de la Einfühlung (empatía) como experiencia de la conciencia ajena; pretendía así fundamentar que, como había indicado Husserl, ese acto abría la posibilidad de una intersubjetividad trascendental como solución al solipsismo de la conciencia. Stein halló la clave de esa esencia en la idea de originariedad, pero intentó evitar el problema de la empatía estética, sirviéndose de Los ídolos del autoconocimiento de Scheler. ABSTRACT In her first research project, (...)
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