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  1. After Death.Giuseppe Baroetto - manuscript
    A review of Dr Joel L. Whitton PhD, Joe Fisher, Life Between Life: Scientific Explorations into the Void Separating One Incarnation from the Next, Grafton Books, 1986, 265 pp.
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  2. Sedative-, Hypnotic-, or Anxiolytic-Related Disorders. Abuse Liability.A. C. Domenic & S. Ofra - forthcoming - Human Studies. In: Kaplan and Sadock’s Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry.
  3. Hyponosis as an Altered State of Consiousness.J. F. Kihlstrom - 2018 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 25 (11-12):53-72.
    The status of hypnosis as an altered state of consciousness has long been controversial. The classic phenomena of hypnosis, such as sensory anaesthesias, analgesia, amnesia, and posthypnotic suggestion, provide prima facie evidence of altered consciousness, but some theorists contend that these are the products of normal mental processes, such as suggestion and expectation. In this article, hypnosis is viewed against a general framework for describing ASCs in terms of four converging operations: induction procedure, subjective experience, behavioural correlates, and physiological correlates. (...)
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  4. Cognitive Penetration, Hypnosis and Imagination.Valtteri Arstila - 2017 - Analysis 77 (1):3-10.
    The thesis of cognitive penetrability, according to which cognitive states can affect perceptual experiences, remains the topic of intense debate among philosophers. A new candidate for a case of cognitive penetration is presented and defended. The candidate is based on studies involving suggestions that something is a certain way, which are usually given under hypnosis, rather than mere request to imagine that things are a certain way.
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  5. Changes in the Sense of Agency During Hypnosis: The Hungarian Version of the Sense of Agency Rating Scale and its Relationship with Phenomenological Aspects of Consciousness.András Költő & Vince Polito - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 49:245-254.
  6. The Illusion of Reincarnation.Giuseppe Baroetto - 2016 - In Hans Thomas Hakl (ed.), Octagon II - The Quest for Wholeness. H.Frietsch Verlag - scientia nova. pp. 265-272.
    What is 'rebirth' in Buddhism? The contribution of hypnotic regression.
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  7. Using Hypnosis to Model Fregoli Delusion and the Impact of Challenges on Belief Revision.Jocelyn M. Elliott, Rochelle E. Cox & Amanda J. Barnier - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 46:36-46.
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  8. Hypnosis and Belief: A Review of Hypnotic Delusions. [REVIEW]Michael H. Connors - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:27-43.
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  9. Patterns of Hypnotic Response, Revisited.John F. Kihlstrom - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 38:99-106.
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  10. The Neural Correlates of Movement Intentions: A Pilot Study Comparing Hypnotic and Simulated Paralysis.Vera U. Ludwig, Jochen Seitz, Carlos Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Annett Höse, Birgit Abler, Günter Hole, Rainer Goebel & Henrik Walter - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 35:158-170.
  11. Hypnosis, Hypnotic Suggestibility, Memory, and Involvement in Films.Reed Maxwell, Steven Jay Lynn & Liam Condon - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:170-184.
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  12. Discrete Response Patterns in the Upper Range of Hypnotic Suggestibility: A Latent Profile Analysis.Devin Blair Terhune - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:334-341.
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  13. Suggestion Overrides Automatic Audiovisual Integration.Catherine Déry, Natasha K. J. Campbell, Michael Lifshitz & Amir Raz - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 24:33-37.
    Cognitive scientists routinely distinguish between controlled and automatic mental processes. Through learning, practice, and exposure, controlled processes can become automatic; however, whether automatic processes can become deautomatized – recuperated under the purview of control – remains unclear. Here we show that a suggestion derails a deeply ingrained process involving involuntary audiovisual integration. We compared the performance of highly versus less hypnotically suggestible individuals in a classic McGurk paradigm – a perceptual illusion task demonstrating the influence of visual facial movements on (...)
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  14. Hypnosis in Spain : From Spectacle to Medical Treatment of Mediumship.Andrea Graus - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 48:85-93.
  15. Using Suggestion to Model Different Types of Automatic Writing.E. Walsh, M. A. Mehta, D. A. Oakley, D. N. Guilmette, A. Gabay, P. W. Halligan & Q. Deeley - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 26:24-36.
    Our sense of self includes awareness of our thoughts and movements, and our control over them. This feeling can be altered or lost in neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in phenomena such as “automatic writing” whereby writing is attributed to an external source. Here, we employed suggestion in highly hypnotically suggestible participants to model various experiences of automatic writing during a sentence completion task. Results showed that the induction of hypnosis, without additional suggestion, was associated with a small but significant (...)
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  16. A Laboratory Analogue of Mirrored-Self Misidentification Delusion: The Role of Hypnosis, Suggestion, and Demand Characteristics.Michael H. Connors, Amanda J. Barnier, Robyn Langdon, Rochelle E. Cox, Vince Polito & Max Coltheart - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1510-1522.
    Mirrored-self misidentification is the delusional belief that one's own reflection in the mirror is a stranger. In two experiments, we tested the ability of hypnotic suggestion to model this condition. In Experiment 1, we compared two suggestions based on either the delusion's surface features (seeing a stranger in the mirror) or underlying processes (impaired face processing). Fifty-two high hypnotisable participants received one of these suggestions either with hypnosis or without in a wake control. In Experiment 2, we examined the extent (...)
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  17. Individual but Not Fragile: Individual Differences in Task Control Predict Stroop Facilitation.E. Kalanthroff & A. Henik - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):413-419.
    The Stroop effect is composed of interference and facilitation effects. The facilitation is less stable and thus many times is referred to as a “fragile effect”. Here we suggest the facilitation effect is highly vulnerable to individual differences in control over the task conflict . We replicated previous findings of a significant correlation between stop-signal reaction time and Stroop interference, and also found a significant correlation between SSRT and the Stroop facilitation effect—participants with low inhibitory control had no facilitation effect (...)
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  18. Commentary on “Altered and Asymmetric Default Mode Network Activity in a “Hypnotic Virtuoso”: An fMRI and EEG Study” – Reply.Susanna Lipari, Francesca Baglio, Ludovica Griffanti, Laura Mendozzi, Massimo Garegnani, Achille Motta, Pietro Cecconi & Luigi Pugnetti - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):385.
  19. Impulsivity, Self-Control, and Hypnotic Suggestibility.V. U. Ludwig, C. Stelzel, H. Krutiak, C. E. Prunkl, R. Steimke, L. M. Paschke, N. Kathmann & H. Walter - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):637-653.
    Hypnotic responding might be due to attenuated frontal lobe functioning after the hypnotic induction. Little is known about whether personality traits linked with frontal functioning are associated with responsiveness to hypnotic suggestions. We assessed whether hypnotic suggestibility is related to the traits of self-control and impulsivity in 154 participants who completed the Brief Self-Control Scale, the Self-Regulation Scale, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale , and the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility . BIS-11 non-planning impulsivity correlated positively with HGSHS:A . Furthermore, (...)
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  20. 7 Hallucinations in Hypnosis.Peter Naish - 2013 - In Fiona Macpherson & Dimitris Platchias (eds.), Hallucination. MIT Press. pp. 121.
  21. Hypnotic Suggestibility Predicts the Magnitude of the Imaginative Word Blindness Suggestion Effect in a Non-Hypnotic Context.Benjamin A. Parris & Zoltan Dienes - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):868-874.
    The present study investigated how the magnitude the word blindness suggestion effect on Stroop interference depended on hypnotic suggestibility when given as an imaginative suggestion and under conditions in which hypnosis was not mentioned. Hypnotic suggestibility is shown to be a significant predictor of the magnitude of the imaginative word blindness suggestion effect under these conditions. This is therefore the first study to show a linear relationship between the imaginative word blindness suggestion effect and hypnotic suggestibility across the whole hypnotizability (...)
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  22. Alcohol Increases Hypnotic Susceptibility.Rebecca Semmens-Wheeler, Zoltán Dienes & Theodora Duka - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):1082-1091.
    One approach to hypnosis suggests that for hypnotic experience to occur frontal lobe activity must be attenuated. For example, cold control theory posits that a lack of awareness of intentions is responsible for the experience of involuntariness and/or the subjective reality of hypnotic suggestions. The mid-dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex and the ACC are candidate regions for such awareness. Alcohol impairs frontal lobe executive function. This study examined whether alcohol affects hypnotisability. We administered 0.8 mg/kg of alcohol or a placebo to 32 (...)
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  23. Increased Response Time of Primed Associates Following an “Episodic” Hypnotic Amnesia Suggestion: A Case of Unconscious Volition.Caleb Henry Smith, David A. Oakley & John Morton - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1305-1317.
    Following a hypnotic amnesia suggestion, highly hypnotically suggestible subjects may experience amnesia for events. Is there a failure to retrieve the material concerned from autobiographical memory, or is it retrieved but blocked from consciousness? Highly hypnotically suggestible subjects produced free-associates to a list of concrete nouns. They were then given an amnesia suggestion for that episode followed by another free association list, which included 15 critical words that had been previously presented. If episodic retrieval for the first trial had been (...)
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  24. Can We Recreate Delusions in the Laboratory?Lisa Bortolotti, Rochelle Cox & Amanda Barnier - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):109 - 131.
    Clinical delusions are difficult to investigate in the laboratory because they co-occur with other symptoms and with intellectual impairment. Partly for these reasons, researchers have recently begun to use hypnosis with neurologically intact people in order to model clinical delusions. In this paper we describe striking analogies between the behavior of patients with a clinical delusion of mirrored self misidentification, and the behavior of highly hypnotizable subjects who receive a hypnotic suggestion to see a stranger when they look in the (...)
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  25. Hypnotic Ingroup–Outgroup Suggestion Influences Economic Decision-Making in an Ultimatum Game.Martin Brüne, Cumhur Tas, Julia Wischniewski, Anna Welpinghus, Christine Heinisch & Albert Newen - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):939-946.
    Studies in economic decision-making have demonstrated that individuals appreciate social values supporting equity and disapprove unfairness when distributing goods between two or more parties. However, this seems to critically depend on psychological mechanisms partly pertaining to the ingroup–outgroup distinction. Little is known as to what extent economic bargaining can be manipulated by means of psychological interventions such has hypnosis. Here we show that a hypnotic ingroup versus outgroup suggestion impacts the tolerance of unfairness in an Ultimatum Game. Specifically, the ingroup (...)
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  26. Commentary on “Altered and Asymmetric Default Mode Network Activity in a “Hypnotic Virtuoso”: An fMRI and EEG Study”.Etzel Cardeña - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1575-1576.
  27. Is Hypnotic Responding the Strategic Relinquishment of Metacognition?Zoltán Dienes, Michael Beran, Johannes L. Brandl, Josef Perner & Joelle Proust - 2012 - In Michael Beran, Johannes Brandl, Josef Perner & Joëlle Proust (eds.), The Foundations of Metacognition. Oxford University Press.
  28. Varieties of Attention in Hypnosis and Meditation.Michael Lifshitz, Natasha Kj Campbell & Amir Raz - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1582-1585.
  29. Can Expectation Enhance Response to Suggestion? De-Automatization Illuminates a Conundrum.Michael Lifshitz, Catherine Howells & Amir Raz - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):1001-1008.
    Disparate theoretical viewpoints construe hypnotic suggestibility either as a stable trait, largely determined by underlying cognitive aptitude, or as a flexible skill amenable to attitudinal factors including beliefs and expectations. Circumscribed findings support both views. The present study attempted to consolidate these orthogonal perspectives through the lens of expectancy modification. We surreptitiously controlled light and sound stimuli to convince participants that they were responding strongly to hypnotic suggestions for visual and auditory hallucinations. Extending our previous findings, we indexed hypnotic suggestibility (...)
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  30. Altered and Asymmetric Default Mode Network Activity in a “Hypnotic Virtuoso”: An fMRI and EEG Study.S. Lipari, F. Baglio, L. Griffanti, L. Mendozzi, M. Garegnani, A. Motta, P. Cecconi & L. Pugnetti - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):393-400.
  31. Suggested Visual Hallucination Without Hypnosis Enhances Activity in Visual Areas of the Brain.William J. McGeown, Annalena Venneri, Irving Kirsch, Luca Nocetti, Kathrine Roberts, Lisa Foan & Giuliana Mazzoni - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):100-116.
    This functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study investigated high and low suggestible people responding to two visual hallucination suggestions with and without a hypnotic induction. Participants in the study were asked to see color while looking at a grey image, and to see shades of grey while looking at a color image. High suggestible participants reported successful alterations in color perception in both tasks, both in and out of hypnosis, and showed a small benefit if hypnosis was induced. Low suggestible people (...)
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  32. Offending the Public: Handke, Herzog, Hypnosis.B. Prager - 2012 - Télos 2012 (159):93-104.
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  33. Hypnosis as a Lens to the Development of Attention.Amir Raz - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1595-1598.
  34. Furnishing Hypnotic Instructions with Implementation Intentions Enhances Hypnotic Responsiveness.Inge Schweiger Gallo, Florian Pfau & Peter M. Gollwitzer - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):1023-1030.
    Forming implementation intentions has been consistently shown to be a powerful self-regulatory strategy. As the self-regulation of thoughts is important for the experience of involuntariness in the hypnotic context, investigating the effectiveness of implementation intentions on the suppression of thoughts was the focus of the present study. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions . Results showed that participants who received information included in the “Carleton Skill Training Program” and in addition formed implementation intentions improved their hypnotic responsiveness (...)
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  35. Prospects for de-Automatization.John F. Kihlstrom - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):332-334.
    Research by Raz and his associates has repeatedly found that suggestions for hypnotic agnosia, administered to highly hypnotizable subjects, reduce or even eliminate Stroop interference. The present paper sought unsuccessfully to extend these findings to negative priming in the Stroop task. Nevertheless, the reduction of Stroop interference has broad theoretical implications, both for our understanding of automaticity and for the prospect of de-automatizing cognition in meditation and other altered states of consciousness.
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  36. Suggestibility and Suggestive Modulation of the Stroop Effect.Irving Kirsch - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):335-336.
    Although the induction of a hypnotic state does not seem necessary for suggestive modulation of the Stroop effect, this important phenomenon has seemed to be dependent on the subject’s level of hypnotic suggestibility. Raz and Campbell’s study indicates that suggestion can modulate the Stroop effect substantially in very low suggestible subjects, as well as in those who are highly suggestible. This finding casts doubt on the presumed mechanism by which suggestive modulation is brought about. Research aimed at uncovering the means (...)
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  37. Hypnosis and the Control of Attention: Where to From Here?Colin M. MacLeod - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):321-324.
    Can suggestion, particularly hypnotic suggestion, influence cognition? Addressing this intriguing question experimentally is on the rise in cognitive research, nowhere more prevalently than in the domain of cognitive control and attention. This may well rest on the intuitive connection between hypnotic suggestion and attention, where the hypnotist controls the subject’s attention. Particularly impressive has been the work of Raz and his colleagues demonstrating the modulation and even the complete elimination of classic Stroop color–word interference when subjects are given a posthypnotic (...)
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  38. The Influence of Suggestibility on Memory.Serge Nicolas, Thérèse Collins, Yannick Gounden & Henry L. Roediger Iii - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):399-400.
  39. Natural Suggestibility in Children.Serge Nicolas, Thérèse Collins, Yannick Gounden & Henry L. Roediger Iii - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):394-398.
  40. Natural Suggestibility in Children.Serge Nicolas, Thérèse Collins, Yannick Gounden & Henry L. Roediger - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):394-398.
  41. Using Hypnosis to Gain Insights Into Healthy and Pathological Cognitive Functioning.David A. Oakley & Peter W. Halligan - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):328-331.
    The demonstration that hypnotic suggestion can inhibit word/colour Stroop highlights one of the benefits of using hypnosis to explore cognitive psychology and in particular attentional processes. The compelling results using a rigorous design have particular relevance for the presumed automaticity of some forms of information processing. Moreover the results support the potential that hypnotic suggestion offers for creating clinically informed analogues of relevant psychological and neuropsychological conditions. As with all novel research, the results of Raz and Campbell raise further operational (...)
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  42. Brain States and Hypnosis Research.Michael I. Posner & Mary K. Rothbart - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):325-327.
    Research in cognitive neuroscience now considers the state of the brain prior to the task an important aspect of performance. Hypnosis seems to alter the brain state in a way which allows external input to dominate over internal goals. We examine how normal development may illuminate the hypnotic state.
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  43. Hypnosis: A Twilight Zone of the Top-Down Variety.Amir Raz - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (12):555-557.
  44. Hypnosis: A Twilight Zone of the Top-Down Variety: Few Have Never Heard of Hypnosis but Most Know Little About the Potential of This Mind–Body Regulation Technique for Advancing Science.Amir Raz - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (12):555-557.
  45. Can Suggestion Obviate Reading? Supplementing Primary Stroop Evidence with Exploratory Negative Priming Analyses.Amir Raz & Natasha K. J. Campbell - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):312-320.
    Using the Stroop paradigm, we have previously shown that a specific suggestion can remove or reduce involuntary conflict and alter information processing in highly suggestible individuals . In the present study, we carefully matched less suggestible individuals to HSIs on a number of factors. We hypothesized that suggestion would influence HSIs more than LSIs and reduce the Stroop effect in the former group. As well, we conducted secondary post hoc analyses to examine negative priming – the apparent disruption of the (...)
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  46. Dissociated Control as a Signature of Typological Variability in High Hypnotic Suggestibility.Devin Blair Terhune, Etzel Cardeña & Magnus Lindgren - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):727-736.
    This study tested the prediction that dissociative tendencies modulate the impact of a hypnotic induction on cognitive control in different subtypes of highly suggestible individuals. Low suggestible , low dissociative highly suggestible , and high dissociative highly suggestible participants completed the Stroop color-naming task in control and hypnosis conditions. The magnitude of conflict adaptation was used as a measure of cognitive control. LS and LDHS participants displayed marginally superior up-regulation of cognitive control following a hypnotic induction, whereas HDHS participants’ performance (...)
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  47. The Freedom From the Perspective of Philosophy and Neuroscience The Critics B. Liberts, G. Roths and W. Singers.Iris Ticac - 2011 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 31 (2):335-352.
  48. Lack of Correlation Between Hypnotic Susceptibility and Various Components of Attention.Katalin Varga, Zoltán Németh & Anna Szekely - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1872-1881.
    The purpose of our study was to measure the relationship between performance on various attentional tasks and hypnotic susceptibility. Healthy volunteers participated in a study, where they had to perform several tasks measuring various attention components in a waking state: sustained attention, selective or focused attention, divided attention and executive attention in task switching. Hypnotic susceptibility was measured in a separate setting by the Waterloo-Stanford Groups Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C .We found no significant correlation between any of the (...)
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  49. The “Short Step” From Love to Hypnosis: A Reconsideration of the Stockholm Syndrome.Celia Jameson - 2010 - Journal for Cultural Research 14 (4):337-355.
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  50. A Phenomenological Survey of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in the Hypnagogic and Hypnopompic States.Simon R. Jones, Charles Fernyhough & Frank Larøi - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):213-224.
    The phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations occurring in hypnagogic and hypnopompic states has received little attention. In a sample of healthy participants, 108 participants reported H&H AVHs and answered subsequent questions on their phenomenology. AVHs in the H&H state were found to be more likely to only feature the occasional clear word than to be clear, to be more likely to be one-off voices than to be recurrent voices, to be more likely to be voices of people known to the (...)
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