About this topic
Summary When engaging with a work of fiction we readily imagine all sorts of things, many of which depart from the world as we know it.  Moreover, we tend have no trouble imagining such factually deviant propositions; our knowledge that, e.g., there are no such things as hobbits does not get in the way of our imagining the world described by Tolkien.  Matters are different, however, when we are asked to imagine morally deviant propositions. If told: "Giselda gave birth to her fourth child," we go along with the author.  But if told, "In killing her baby, Giselda did the right thing; after all, it was a girl," we tend to resist.  How to explain this asymmetry has come to be known as the puzzle of imaginative resistance.
Key works This puzzle dates back at least to Hume 1757.  It was reintroduced into contemporary discussion by Walton in his 1990 and 1994/2015Moran 1994 first uses the term "resistance" to describe the phenomenon;Gendler 2000 coins the name for the puzzle.  Other important discussions occur in Gendler 2006, Walton 2006, and Weatherson 2004.
Introductions Gendler & Liao 2016 provides a useful overview of the debate.
Related categories

65 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 65
  1. added 2020-08-28
    Coping with Imaginative Resistance.Daniel Altshuler & Emar Maier - manuscript
    Philosophers have argued there is a particular kind of jarring effect in certain types of narrative fiction that prevents readers from imaginative engagement and/or detracts from the author’s authority over what’s fictionally true. In this paper we argue that this so-called imaginative resistance effect does not usually prevent readers from engaging imaginatively, nor does it detract from the author’s authority over what’s fictionally true. We distinguish three possible interpretation strategies that readers can follow to overcome an initial resistance: Face Value, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2020-07-24
    Making Sorrow Sweet: Emotion and Empathy in the Experience of Fiction. In A. Houen (Ed.), Affect and Literature (Cambridge Critical Concepts, Pp. 190-210). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Doi:10.1017/9781108339339.011.A. E. Denham, A. E. Denham & A. Denham - 2020 - In Denham, A. (2020). Making Sorrow Sweet: Emotion and Empathy in the Experience of Fiction. In A. Houen (Ed.), Affect and Literature (Cambridge Critical Concepts, pp. 190-210). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. doi:10.1017/9781108339339.011. Cambridge, UK: pp. 190-210.
    The nature and consequences of readers’ affective engagement with literature has, in recent years, captured the attention of experimental psychologists and philosophers alike. Psychological studies have focused principally on the causal mechanisms explaining our affective interactions with fictions, prescinding from questions concerning their rational justifiability. Transportation Theory, for instance, has sought to map out the mechanisms the reader tracks the narrative experientially, mirroring its descriptions through first-personal perceptual imaginings, affective and motor responses and even evaluative beliefs. Analytical philosophers, by contrast, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. added 2020-04-18
    Corruption by Literature.Joshua Landy - 2010 - Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2 (1).
    This essay argues not just that literature can corrupt its readers—if literature can improve, it can also corrupt—but that some of that is our fault: by telling people to extract moral lessons from fictions, we’ve set them up to be led astray by writers like Ayn Rand. A global attitude of message-mining sets readers up to be misled, confused, or complacent (because they “gave at the office”), as well as to reject some excellent books. Ironically, the best way to make (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. added 2020-02-04
    Imaginative Resistance and Modal Knowledge.Daniel Nolan - 2020 - Res Philosophica 97 (3):1-25.
    Readers of fictions sometimes resist taking certain kinds of claims to be true according to those fictions, even when they appear explicitly or follow from applying ordinary principles of interpretation. This "imaginative resistance" is often taken to be significant for a range of philosophical projects outside aesthetics, including giving us evidence about what is possible and what is impossible, as well as the limits of conceivability, or readers' normative commitments. I will argue that this phenomenon cannot do the theoretical work (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. added 2019-11-24
    Imaginability and Possibility.Yingying Tang - 2019 - Studies in Logic 12 (3):102-114.
    Recently there is heated discussion on the puzzle of imaginative resistance, i.e. the puzzle of why it is difficult to imagine certain counterfactual scenarios. After examining Brian Weatherson’s “In-Virtue-Of Hypothesis”, I put forward an alternative hypothesis that all and only conceptual impossibilities are unimaginable. I argue that my account has some theoretical advantages over the In-Virtue-Of hypothesis. I consider some challenges to my hypothesis and then attempt to show that those objections are unsuccessful.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. added 2019-06-06
    Marcel Danesi and Frank Nuessel, Eds. "The Imaginative Basis of Thought and Culture: Contemporary Perspectives on Giambattista Vico". [REVIEW]Nancy du Bois - 1995 - New Vico Studies 13:75.
  7. added 2019-03-07
    Imaginative Resistance as Imagistic Resistance.Uku Tooming - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 48 (5):684-706.
    When we are invited to imagine an unacceptable moral proposition to be true in fiction, we feel resistance when we try to imagine it. Despite this, it is nonetheless possible to suppose that the proposition is true. In this paper, I argue that existing accounts of imaginative resistance are unable to explain why only attempts to imagine the truth of moral propositions cause resistance. My suggestion is that imagination, unlike supposition, involves mental imagery and imaginative resistance arises when imagery that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. added 2019-03-01
    Death on the Freeway: Imaginative Resistance as Narrator Accommodation.Daniel Altshuler & Emar Maier - forthcoming - In Ilaria Frana, Paula Menendez Benito & Rajesh Bhatt (eds.), Making Worlds Accessible: Festschrift for Angelika Kratzer. Amherst: UMass ScholarWorks.
    We propose to analyze well-known cases of "imaginative resistance" from the philosophical literature (Gendler, Walton, Weatherson) as involving the inference that particular content should be attributed to either: (i) a character rather than the narrator or, (ii) an unreliable, irrational, opinionated, and/or morally deviant "first person" narrator who was originally perceived to be a typical impersonal, omniscient, "effaced" narrator. We model the latter type of attribution in terms of two independently motivated linguistic mechanisms: accommodation of a discourse referent (Lewis, Stalnaker, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. added 2018-10-23
    Imaginative Resistance and Variation.Eric Peterson - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (1):67-80.
    Imaginative resistance is roughly a phenomenon that is characterized by either an inability or an unwillingness to imagine some proposition. It has been noted that this phenomenon varies from person to person and from context to context. Most philosophers account for this variation by appealing to contextual factor. While such accounts make progress, I argue that the variation outruns the use of such a tactic. I propose a new account that can explain all of the variation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. added 2018-08-03
    On the Study of Imaginative Resistance.Andrea Sauchelli - 2019 - Analytic Philosophy 60 (2):164-178.
    I argue that the current methodology employed to study imaginative resistance should not be used to draw general conclusions about the influence of genre on episodes of imaginative resistance caused by complex works of art. One of the main problems is that the mini stories upon which the current methodology relies are inadequate—mostly because they are artless and ‘flat’. Mini stories cannot generate imaginative experiences structurally similar to the experiences elicited by complex and interesting works of fictional art.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. added 2017-02-15
    "SJ"'I Say More': Sacrament and Hopkins's Imaginative Realism.".John D. Boyd - 1989 - Renascence: Essays on Values in Literature 42:51-64.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. added 2017-02-13
    Education for Imaginative Knowledge.A. T. Nuyen - 1997 - Journal of Thought 32:37-48.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. added 2017-02-13
    Imaginative Writing.Wilbur Schramm - 1941 - In Norman Foerster, John Calvin McGalliard, René Wellek, Austin Warren & Wilbur Schramm (eds.), Literary Scholarship. Chapel Hill, the University of North Carolina Press. pp. 177--213.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. added 2017-02-11
    Imaginative Origins of Modernity: Life as Daydream and Nightmare.Claes G. Ryn - 1997 - Humanitas 10 (2):42.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. added 2017-01-26
    Deeply Imaginative Scepticism.Leonard Angel - 2010 - Dialogue 49 (3):489-496.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. added 2017-01-24
    Being There: On the Imaginative Aspects of Understanding Others and Being Understood.Douglas Hollan - 2008 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 36 (4):475-489.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  17. added 2017-01-23
    An Experimental Philosophy Approach to Imaginative Resistance.Sydney Levine - 2009 - Dissertation, Yale University
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. added 2017-01-19
    Evidence Marshaling for Imaginative Fact Investigation.David A. Schum - 2001 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 9 (2-3):165-188.
  19. added 2017-01-18
    Is Art the Imaginative Expression of a Wish?C. J. Ducasse - 1928 - Philosophical Review 37 (4):360-372.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. added 2017-01-17
    Poetic License: Learning Morality From Fiction in Light of Imaginative Resistance.John W. Rosenbaum - 2016 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 35 (3):165-183.
    Imaginative resistance (IR) is rejecting a claim that is true within a fictional world. Accounts that describe IR hold that readers exit a fiction at points of resistance. But if resistance entails exiting a fiction, then learning morality from fiction doesn’t occur. But moral learning from fiction does occur; some such cases are instances of accepting a norm one first denied. I amend current solutions to IR with poetic license. The more poetic license granted a work, the more flexible one (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. added 2017-01-17
    Alfarabi's Imaginative Critique: Overflowing Materialism in Virtuous Community.Joshua M. Hall - 2015 - South African Journal of Philosophy 34 (2):175-192.
    Though currently marginalised in Western philosophy, tenth-century Arabic philosopher Abu Nasr Alfarabi is one of the most important thinkers of the medieval era. In fact, he was known as the ‘second teacher’ (after Aristotle) to philosophers such as Avicenna and Averroes. As this epithet suggests, Alfarabi and his successors engaged in a critical and creative dialogue with thinkers from other historical traditions, including that of the Ancient Greeks, although the creativity of his part is often marginalised as well. In this (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. added 2017-01-16
    The Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance.Tamar Szabo Gendler - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):55.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   128 citations  
  23. added 2017-01-15
    Being There: On the Imaginative Aspects of Understanding Others and Being Understood.Douglas Hollan - 2008 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 36 (4):475-489.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  24. added 2017-01-01
    Morals in Fiction and Fictional Morality.Kendall L. Walton & Michael Tanner - 1994 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 68 (1):27-66.
  25. added 2016-12-08
    The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction.Shaun Nichols (ed.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This volume presents new essays on the propositional imagination by leading researchers. The propositional imagination---the mental capacity we exploit when we imagine that everyone is colour-blind or that Hamlet is a procrastinator---plays an essential role in philosophical theorizing, engaging with fiction, and indeed in everyday life. Yet only recently has there been a systematic attempt to give a cognitive account of the propositional imagination. These thirteen essays, specially written for the volume, capitalize on this recent work, extending the theoretical picture (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  26. added 2016-09-12
    Imaginative and Fictionality Failure: A Normative Approach.Nils-Hennes Stear - 2015 - Philosophers' Imprint 15.
    If a work of literary fiction prescribes us to imagine that the Devil made a bet with God and transformed into a poodle, then that claim is true in the fiction and we imagine accordingly. Generally, we cooperate imaginatively with literary fictions, however bizarre, and the things authors write into their stories become true in the fiction. But for some claims, such as moral falsehoods, this seems not to be straightforwardly the case, which raises the question: Why not? The puzzles (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  27. added 2016-05-14
    Hume.Fabian Dorsch - 2016 - In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge. pp. 40-54.
    This chapter overviews Hume’s thoughts on the nature and role of imagining and focusses primarily on three important distinctions that Hume draws among our conscious mental episodes: (i) between impressions and ideas; (ii) between ideas of the memory and ideas of the imagination; and (iii), among the ideas of the imagination, between ideas of the judgement and ideas of the fancy. In addition, the chapter considers Hume’s views on the imagination as a faculty of producing ideas, as well as on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28. added 2016-05-14
    Hume on the Imagination.Fabian Dorsch - 2015 - Rero Doc Digital Library:1-28.
    This is the original, longer draft for my entry on Hume in the 'The Routledge Hand- book of Philosophy of Imagination', edited by Amy Kind and published by Routledge in 2016 (see the separate entry). — Please always cite the Routledge version, unless there are passages concerned that did not make it into the Handbook for reasons of length. — -/- This chapter overviews Hume’s thoughts on the nature and the role of imagining, with an almost exclusive focus on the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. added 2015-12-11
    Imagining as a Guide to Possibility.Peter Kung - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (3):620-663.
    I lay out the framework for my theory of sensory imagination in “Imagining as a guide to possibility.” Sensory imagining involves mental imagery , and crucially, in describing the content of imagining, I distinguish between qualitative content and assigned content. Qualitative content derives from the mental image itself; for visual imaginings, it is what is “pictured.” For example, visually imagine the Philadelphia Eagles defeating the Pittsburgh Steelers to win their first Super Bowl. You picture the greenness of the field and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  30. added 2015-09-15
    Imaginative Resistance, Narrative Engagement, Genre.Shen-yi Liao - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (2):461-482.
    Imaginative resistance refers to a phenomenon in which people resist engaging in particular prompted imaginative activities. On one influential diagnosis of imaginative resistance, the systematic difficulties are due to these particular propositions’ discordance with real-world norms. This essay argues that this influential diagnosis is too simple. While imagination is indeed by default constrained by real-world norms during narrative engagement, it can be freed with the power of genre conventions and expectations.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  31. added 2015-08-04
    Neuroscientific Prediction and the Intrusion of Intuitive Metaphysics.David Rose, Wesley Buckwalter & Shaun Nichols - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (7).
    How might advanced neuroscience—in which perfect neuro-predictions are possible—interact with ordinary judgments of free will? We propose that peoples' intuitive ideas about indeterminist free will are both imported into and intrude into their representation of neuroscientific scenarios and present six experiments demonstrating intrusion and importing effects in the context of scenarios depicting perfect neuro-prediction. In light of our findings, we suggest that the intuitive commitment to indeterminist free will may be resilient in the face of scientific evidence against such free (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  32. added 2015-04-25
    The Cognitive Architecture of Imaginative Resistance.Kengo Miyazono & Shen-yi Liao - 2016 - In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. pp. 233-246.
    Where is imagination in imaginative resistance? We seek to answer this question by connecting two ongoing lines of inquiry in different subfields of philosophy. In philosophy of mind, philosophers have been trying to understand imaginative attitudes’ place in cognitive architecture. In aesthetics, philosophers have been trying to understand the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. By connecting these two lines of inquiry, we hope to find mutual illumination of an attitude (or cluster of attitudes) and a phenomenon that have vexed philosophers. Our (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  33. added 2015-03-23
    Counterfactual Examples in Philosophy: The Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance.Brad Murray - forthcoming - Prolegomena.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. added 2015-03-23
    1 Imaginative Resistance and the White Gaze in Machete and The Help.Dan Flory - 2013 - In Dan Flory & Mary Bloodsworth-Lugo (eds.), Race, Philosophy, and Film. Routledge. pp. 50--17.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. added 2015-03-23
    1. The Puzzle (s) of Imaginative Resistance.Aaron Meskin & Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2011 - In Elisabeth Schellekens & Peter Goldie (eds.), The Aesthetic Mind: Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. pp. 239.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. added 2015-03-22
    The Island Has Its Reasons: Moral Subjectivism in Fiction.Kasandra Barker - 2016 - Dialogue 55 (2):121-124.
    Tamar Gendler takes on “explaining our comparative difficulty in imagining fictional worlds that we take to be morally deviant” (56), otherwise known as the puzzle of imaginative resistance. Generally speaking, readers have no trouble believing untrue factual claims such as in Alice in Wonderland or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, but we resist claims which advocate praise or approval of immoral acts such as murder. Gendler submits that the implied author aims to persuade the reader to change his or her (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. added 2014-04-02
    Empirically Investigating Imaginative Resistance.Shen-yi Liao, Nina Strohminger & Chandra Sekhar Sripada - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):339-355.
    Imaginative resistance refers to a phenomenon in which people resist engaging in particular prompted imaginative activities. Philosophers have primarily theorized about this phenomenon from the armchair. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of empirical methods for investigating imaginative resistance. We present two studies that help to establish the psychological reality of imaginative resistance, and to uncover one factor that is significant for explaining this phenomenon but low in psychological salience: genre. Furthermore, our studies have the methodological upshot of showing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  38. added 2014-04-02
    Not Moderately Moral: Why Hume Is Not a "Moderate Moralist".E. M. Dadlez & Jeanette Bicknell - 2013 - Philosophy and Literature 37 (2):330-342.
    If philosophers held popularity contests, David Hume would be a perennial winner. Witty, a bon vivant, and champion of reason over bigotry and superstition, it is not surprising that many contemporary thinkers want to recruit him as an ally or claim his views as precursors to their own. In the debate over the moral content of artworks and its possible relevance for artistic and aesthetic value, the group whose views are known variously as “ethicism,” “moralism,” or “moderate moralism” has claimed (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. added 2014-03-29
    Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology.Tamar Gendler - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    In this volume, Tamar Gendler draws together fourteen essays that together illuminate this topic. Three intertwined themes connect the essays.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  40. added 2014-03-28
    The Problem of Imaginative Resistance.Tamar Szabó Gendler & Shen-yi Liao - 2016 - In John Gibson & Noël Carroll (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge. pp. 405-418.
    The problem of imaginative resistance holds interest for aestheticians, literary theorists, ethicists, philosophers of mind, and epistemologists. We present a somewhat opinionated overview of the philosophical discussion to date. We begin by introducing the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. We then review existing responses to the problem, giving special attention to recent research directions. Finally, we consider the philosophical significance that imaginative resistance has—or, at least, is alleged to have—for issues in moral psychology, theories of cognitive architecture, and modal epistemology.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  41. added 2014-03-21
    The Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance.Tamar Szabo Gendler - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):55-81.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   94 citations  
  42. added 2014-03-18
    The Evaluative Character of Imaginative Resistance.Dustin R. Stokes - 2006 - British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (4):287-405.
    A fiction may prescribe imagining that a pig can talk or tell the future. A fiction may prescribe imagining that torturing innocent persons is a good thing. We generally comply with imaginative prescriptions like the former, but not always with prescriptions like the latter: we imagine non-evaluative fictions without difficulty but sometimes resist imagining value-rich fictions. Thus arises the puzzle of imaginative resistance. Most analyses of the phenomenon focus on the content of the relevant imaginings. The present analysis focuses instead (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  43. added 2014-03-16
    Imaginative Resistance and Psychological Necessity.Julia Driver - 2008 - Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (1):301-313.
    Some of our moral commitments strike us as necessary, and this feature of moral phenomenology is sometimes viewed as incompatible with sentimentalism, since sentimentalism holds that our commitments depend, in some way, on sentiment. His dependence, or contingency, is what seems incompatible with necessity. In response to this sentimentalists hold that the commitments are psychologically necessary. However, little has been done to explore this kind of necessity. In this essay I discuss psychological necessity, and how the phenomenon of imaginative resistance (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  44. added 2014-03-15
    Review: The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. [REVIEW]A. Everett - 2007 - Mind 116 (464):1151-1154.
  45. added 2014-03-14
    Imaginative Resistance and the Moral/Conventional Distinction.Neil Levy - 2005 - Philosophical Psychology 18 (2):231 – 241.
    Children, even very young children, distinguish moral from conventional transgressions, inasmuch as they hold that the former, but not the latter, would still be wrong if there was no rule prohibiting them. Many people have taken this finding as evidence that morality is objective, and therefore universal. I argue that reflection on the phenomenon of imaginative resistance will lead us to question these claims. If a concept applies in virtue of the obtaining of a set of more basic facts, then (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  46. added 2014-02-19
    Morality, Fiction, and Possibility.Brian Weatherson - 2004 - Philosophers' Imprint 4:1-27.
    Authors have a lot of leeway with regard to what they can make true in their story. In general, if the author says that p is true in the fiction we’re reading, we believe that p is true in that fiction. And if we’re playing along with the fictional game, we imagine that, along with everything else in the story, p is true. But there are exceptions to these general principles. Many authors, most notably Kendall Walton and Tamar Szabó Gendler, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  47. added 2013-08-24
    The Imaginative Agent.Neil Van Leeuwen - 2016 - In Amy Kind & Peter Kung (ed.), Knowledge through Imagination. Oxford University Press. pp. 85-109.
    Imagination contributes to human agency in ways that haven't been well understood. I argue here that pathways from imagistic imagining to emotional engagement support three important agential capacities: 1. bodily preparedness for potential events in one's nearby environment; 2. evaluation of potential future action; and 3. empathy-based moral appraisal. Importantly, however, the kind of pathway in question (I-C-E-C: imagining-categorization-emotion-conceptualization) also enables engagement with fiction. So human enchantment with fiction is a consequence of imaginative pathways that make us the kind of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  48. added 2013-01-14
    Imaginative Resistance.Tamar Szabó Gendler - 2009 - In Stephen Davies, Kathleen Marie Higgins, Robert Hopkins, Robert Stecker, David Cooper & E. (eds.), A Companion to Aesthetics: Second Edition. Blackwell.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49. added 2012-10-10
    The Aesthetics of Actor-Character Race Matching in Film Fictions.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2012 - Philosophers' Imprint 12.
    Marguerite Clark as Topsy in Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1918). Charlton Heston as Ramon Miguel Vargas in Touch of Evil (1958). Mizuo Peck as Sacagawea in Night at the Museum (2006). From the early days of cinema to its classic-era through to the contemporary Hollywood age, the history of cinema is replete with films in which the racial (or ethnic) background of a principal character does not match the background of the actor or actress portraying that character. I call this actor-character (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. added 2012-10-10
    Unrealistic Fictions.Allan Hazlett & Christy Mag Uidhir - 2011 - American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):33--46.
    In this paper, we develop an analysis of unrealistic fiction that captures the everyday sense of ‘unrealistic’. On our view, unrealistic fictions are a species of inconsistent fictions, but fictions for which such inconsistency, given the supporting role we claim played by genre, needn’t be a critical defect. We first consider and reject an analysis of unrealistic fiction as fiction that depicts or describes unlikely events; we then develop our own account and make an initial statement of it: unrealistic fictions (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
1 — 50 / 65