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  1. Buddhist Ethics.Kon-Sprul Blo-Gros-Mtha -Yas & International Translation Committee - 1998
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  2. Living the Skilful Life an Introduction to Buddhist Ethics. Abhaya - 1996
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  3. Classes of Agent and the Moral Logic of the Pali Canon.Martin T. Adam - 2008 - Argumentation 22 (1):115-124.
    This paper aims to lay bare the underlying logical structure of early Buddhist moral thinking. It argues that moral vocabulary in the Pali Suttas varies depending on the kind of agent under discussion and that this variance reflects an understanding that the phenomenology of moral experience also differs on the same basis. An attempt is made to spell this out in terms of attachment. The overall picture of Buddhist ethics that emerges is that of an agent-based moral contextualism. This account (...)
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  4. The Untested Dharma is Not Worth Living.Aditya Adarkar - 2005 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 9 (1-3):117-130.
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  5. Ludwig Wittgenstein: Ethics and Religion (Review). [REVIEW]Shabbir Ahsen - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (3):422-424.
    No one in twentieth-century analytic philosophy was more preoccupied with the issues of ethics and religion than Ludwig Wittgenstein. In an age when religion has remained a prominent force, contrary to what some would have thought a hundred years ago, it is not surprising to see a book on Wittgenstein's concern with ethics and religion by a group of Indian philosophers. Ludwig Wittgenstein: Ethics and Religion, edited by Kali Charan Pandey—a collection of fifteen essays, some of which were presented at (...)
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  6. Rules of Untouchability in Ancient and Medieval Law Books: Householders, Competence, and Inauspiciousness. [REVIEW]Mikael Aktor - 2002 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 6 (3):243-274.
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  7. Mahatma Gandhi on Violence and Peace Education.Douglas Allen - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (3):290-310.
    : Gandhi can serve as a valuable catalyst allowing us to rethink our philosophical positions on violence, nonviolence, and education. Especially insightful are Gandhi's formulations of the multidimensionality of violence, including educational violence, and the violence of the status quo. His peace education offers many possibilities for dealing with short-term violence, but its greatest strength is its long-term preventative education and socialization. Key to Gandhi's peace education are his ethical and ontological formulations of means-ends relations; the need to uncover root (...)
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  8. Dharma in Hindu Ethics.Harvey Paul Alper & Austin B. Creel - 1981 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 101 (4):492.
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  9. Sources of Hindu Dharma in its Socio-Religious Aspects.Anant Sadashiv Altekar - 1952 - Sholapur, Institute of Public Administration.
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  10. The Concept and Practice of Doing Merit in Early Theravada Buddhism.Roy C. Amore - 1971 - Umi Dissertation Information Service.
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  11. Compassion and Benevolence: A Comparative Study of Early Buddhist and Classical Confucian Ethics.Ok-Sun An - 1997 - Peter Lang.
  12. A Study of Early Buddhist Ethics: In Comparison with Classical Confucianist Ethics.Ok-sun An - 1995 - Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
    The purpose of this study is to explore early Buddhist ethics in comparison with classical Confucianist ethics and to show similarities. The study suggests that the popular belief that the two ethical systems are radically different from each other needs to be reconsidered. When a focus is given to the development, transformation, and realization of the self, a similar framework is revealed in the two ethical systems. Furthermore, this study intends to reject the popular thesis: early Buddhism is only self-liberation-concerned (...)
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  13. Character Consequentialism: Confucianism, Buddhism and Mill.Joshua Anderson - 2011 - Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion 16:138-153.
    When discussing Eastern philosophy there is often a difficulty since characteristically Eastern ways of thinking do not map well onto Western philosophic categories. Yet, P. J. Ivanhoe suggests that a careful reading of Confucianism can illuminate and expand Western approaches to ethics. Ivanhoe maintains that the best way to understand Confucian ethics is as a hybrid of virtue ethics and consequentialism, a view he calls character consequentialism (CC). The paper will progress in the following way. First, I present Ivanhoe’s conception (...)
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  14. Janamejaya's Last Question.Christopher R. Austin - 2009 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (6):597-625.
    This article examines closely an important passage at the conclusion of the Mahābhārata wherein the final state of the epic heroes after death is defined. The Critical Edition’s phrasing of what precisely became of the characters once they arrived in heaven is unclear, and manuscript variants offer two apparently contradictory readings. In this article I present evidence in support of one of these readings, and respond to the Mahābhārata ’s seventeenth century commentator Nīlakaṇṭha Caturdhara, who champions the other. Underlying and (...)
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  15. The Dhammapada.Irving Babbitt, F. Max Müller & Dora Drew Babbitt (eds.) - 1936 - London: Oxford University Press.
    The 423 verses in the collection known a The Dhammapada are attributed to the Buddha himself and form the essence of the ethics of Buddhist philosophy.
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  16. Metaphors & Morality.Nandita Bagchi - 2002 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 29 (2-3):229-235.
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  17. Reconceiving Surrogacy: Toward a Reproductive Justice Account of Indian Surrogacy.Alison Bailey - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (4):715-741.
    My project here is to argue for situating moral judgments about Indian surrogacy in the context of Reproductive Justice. I begin by crafting the best picture of Indian surrogacy available to me while marking some worries I have about discursive colonialism and epistemic honesty. Western feminists' responses to contract pregnancy fall loosely into two interrelated moments: post-Baby M discussions that focus on the morality of surrogacy work in Western contexts, and feminist biomedical ethnographies that focus on the lived dimensions of (...)
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  18. A Modern Introduction to Indian Ethics: My Impressions of Indian Moral Problems and Concepts.Surendra Sheodas Barlingay - 1998 - Penman Publishers.
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  19. Theory and Comparison in the Discussion of Buddhist Ethics.Michael G. Barnhart - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1):16-43.
    Comparisons, and by that I mean the hunt for essential similarities or at least serious family resemblances, between the ethical views of Western and non-Western thinkers have been a staple of comparative philosophy for quite some time now. Some of these comparisons, such as between the views of Aristotle and Confucius, seem especially apt and revealing. However, I’ve often wondered whether Western “ethical theory”—virtue ethics, deontology, or consequentialism—is always the best lens through which to approach non-Western ethical thought. Particularly when (...)
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  20. Buddhist Ethics.David Bastow - 1969 - Religious Studies 5 (2):195 - 206.
    The canonical texts of Early Buddhism describe and explain a way to achieve a goal. What the goal is is not immediately clear; many different descriptions are given of it, and these descriptions can be variously interpreted. It is to some extent easier to find out what is the way to achieve the goal; the texts contain frequently repeated lists of stages on this Way. The best way of starting a consideration of the nature of the goal and its moral (...)
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  21. Gandhian Nonviolence and the Problem of Preferable Violence.Jacob N. Bauer - 2014 - The Acorn 15 (1):26-32.
    In this article, I argue that Gandhi can prefer violence in cases, but still morally object to all forms of violence. Even though this can seem to be a contradiction, nonetheless, one can prefer an action without thinking that action is morally justified. Next, I explore the objection that preferring a violent act, such as violent self-defense, over a act that is not violent, such as running away, seems to prefer an action that is more violent to one that is (...)
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  22. The Veil of Maya: Schopenhauer's Theory of Falsification: The Key to Schopenhauer's Appropriation of Pre-Systematic Indian Philosophical Thought.Douglas Leo Berger - 2000 - Dissertation, Temple University
    Schopenhauer, perhaps more than any other Western philosopher, has been associated with Asian, and specifically Indian philosophy. The problem in the last hundred years of commentarial literature has been assessing what his relationship to pre-systematic Indian philosophical thought was. Both European and Indian scholars have vacillated over the years from great confidence that Schopenhauer's system was inspired by and even representative of classical Indian thought to a concurrence that Schopenhauer's knowledge of pre-systematic Hinduism and Buddhism was superficial and his invoking (...)
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  23. Javano! Vicara Aura Karttavya-Preraka Nibandha. Bhagavanadina - 1950 - Purvodaya Praka Sana.
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  24. Politics and Ethics of the Indian Constitution.Rajeev Bhargava (ed.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press India.
    This volume examines various aspects of the Indian Constitution from the perspective of political theory. The essays view the Constitution as a political or ethical document, thereby reflecting configurations of power and interests or articulating a moral vision.
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  25. Niti Satakam Samskrtatika Scahindi-Anglabhasanuvadasahitam.Ganga Sagar Bhartrhari & Rai - 1987 - Caukhambha Oriyantaliya.
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  26. Buddhist Foundations of Global Ethics.Sr Bhatt - 2003 - In S. R. Bhatt (ed.), Buddhist Thought and Culture in India and Korea. Indian Council of Philosophical Research. pp. 194.
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  27. Ethics and Virtue in Classical Indian Thinking.Purushottama Bilimoria - 2014 - In Stan van Hooft & Nafsika Athanassoulis (eds.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen Publishing.
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  28. The Essentials of Buddhist Doctrine and Ethics.Maurice Bloomfield - 1892 - International Journal of Ethics 2 (3):313-326.
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  29. The Essentials of Buddhist Doctrine and Ethics.Maurice Bloomfield - 1892 - International Journal of Ethics 2 (3):313-326.
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  30. The Essentials of Buddhist Doctrine and Ethics.Maurice Bloomfield - 1891 - Ethics 2 (3):313.
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  31. Varnadharma, Nishkam Karma and Practical Morality.S. Bokil - 2000 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 27 (4):499.
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  32. Varnadharma, Niskama Karma and Practical Morality.S. V. Bokil - 2001 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 28 (2):272-279.
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  33. Bile & Bodhisattvas: Śāntideva on Justified Anger.Nicolas Bommarito - 2011 - Journal of Buddhist Ethics 18:357-81.
    In his famous text the Bodhicaryāvatāra, the 8th century Buddhist philosopher Śāntideva argues that anger towards people who harm us is never justified. The usual reading of this argument rests on drawing similarities between harms caused by persons and those caused by non-persons. After laying out my own interpretation of Śāntideva's reasoning, I offer some objections to Śāntideva's claim about the similarity between animate and inanimate causes of harm inspired by contemporary philosophical literature in the West. Following this, I argue (...)
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  34. Punishment and Reincarnation.Thom Brooks - 2008 - Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion 13:21-37.
    The doctrine of reincarnation is endorsed by various philosophers in both the Western and Eastern traditions. This paper will explore the relationship between reincarnation and legal punishment. Three competing views of reincarnation will be analyzed on this issue: Plato's work on Socrates, the Bhagavad Gita, and Mahayana Buddhism. Each view presents interesting, but different perspectives on how our view of the person might affect how we punish. The paper will claim that there are practical implications on the administration of justice (...)
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  35. What is Global About Global Justice? Toward a Global Philosophy.Thom Brooks - unknown
    Global justice as a field must confront a central problem: how global is global justice? A defining feature about the burgeoning literature in global justice is its operation within a bounded, philosophical tradition. Global justice research is too often a product of one tradition in self-isolation from others that nonetheless claims to speak for what is best for all. This criticism applies to various philosophical traditions whether so-called “analytic,” “Continental” or others. The problem is that each tradition too often works (...)
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  36. Svaraj, the Indian Ideal of Freedom: A Political or Religious Concept?: C. MacKenzie Brown.C. Mackenzie Brown - 1984 - Religious Studies 20 (3):429-441.
    To many Western students of India, svarāj and mokṣa have often seemed to represent two very different ideals of freedom, the former social, political, and modern; the latter individual, spiritual, and traditional. It is not surprising that the Hindu ideal of spiritual freedom is most commonly known by the term mokṣa , for it is this word that is usually listed as the fourth and supreme goal in the famous four ends of man . The first three ends, desire , (...)
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  37. The Ethics of Excess and Indian Intervention in South Asia.Ralph Buultjens - 1989 - Ethics and International Affairs 3 (1):73–100.
    India has promoted its power through intervention in neighboring countries under the cloak of morality. The United States, Great Britain, and Russia have nonetheless tacitly endorsed India's role as the policing force in the region. Does this recognition justify India's actions toward its weaker and smaller neighbors?
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  38. Would A Buddhist Freeze A Cane Toad?An Exploration Of The Modern Phenomenon Of Environmental Buddhism And The Ethics Related To The Doctrine Of Ahimsa (Non-Harming).Cathy Byrne - 2006 - Contemporary Buddhism 7 (2):117-127.
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  39. Trivarga (The Threefold Sphere of Indian Ethics).M. Christopher Byrski - 1976 - Dialectics and Humanism 3 (3-4):17-31.
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  40. Indian Buddhist Philosophy.Amber Carpenter - 2013 - Acumen Publishing.
    Organised in broadly chronological terms, this book presents the philosophical arguments of the great Indian Buddhist philosophers of the fifth century BCE to the eighth century CE. Each chapter examines their core ethical, metaphysical and epistemological views as well as the distinctive area of Buddhist ethics that we call today moral psychology. Throughout, the book follows three key themes that both tie the tradition together and are the focus for most critical dialogue: the idea of an?tman or no-self, the appearance/reality (...)
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  41. Buddhist Ethics?John Ross Carter - 2005 - In William Schweiker (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Religious Ethics. Blackwell.
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  42. Mahabharata Now: Narration, Aesthetics, Ethics.Arindam Chakrabarti & Sibaji Bandyopadhyay (eds.) - 2016 - Routledge India.
    The _Mahabharata _is at once an archive and a living text, a sourcebook complete by itself and an open text perennially under construction. Driving home this striking contemporary relevance of the famous Indian epic, _Mahabharata Now _focuses on the issues of narration, aesthetics and ethics, as also their interlinkages. The cross-disciplinary essays in the volume imaginatively re-interpret the ‘timeless’ classic in the light of the pre-modern Indian narrative styles, poetics, aesthetic codes, and moral puzzles; the Western theories on modern ethics, (...)
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  43. Is an Indian Ethics of Virtue Possible?D. Chakraborty - 2006 - Journal of Human Values 12 (1):91-98.
    The recent revival of interest in the importance of virtues marks a shift of substance and method in thinking about it. The shift is away from discussion of rules and principles and focused on a discussion of traits, character and conditions of their excellence. This article attempts at unfolding the exact nature of an Indian ethics of virtue, which is yet to be explored in a systematic way. This enquiry into the exciting terrain of Indian philosophy inevitably leads to the (...)
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  44. Gandhi Darshan: A Panacea to the Evil of Political Corruption in India.Shiladitya Chakraborty - 2017 - Dialogue and Universalism 27 (1):91-102.
    Corruption is the greatest pitfall of Indian democracy; it gradually erodes the faith of the Indian citizens in parliamentary democracy. Another disconcerting trend is the criminalization of politics which has emerged as a natural corollary to political corruption. The failure to deal with political corruption and criminalization has led to the depravation of political morality in India. It is against this backdrop that the article would examine the issues of political corruption and criminalization of politics in India. The article would (...)
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  45. Moral Values, Attitudes and Moods: A Book on Ethics for a New World Order.Jagdish Chander & K. B. - 1975 - Prajapita Brahma Kumaris Ishwariya Vishwa-Vidyalaya.
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  46. Self-with-Other in Teacher Practice: A Case Study Through Care, Aristotelian Virtue, and Buddhist Ethics.Dave Chang & Heesoon Bai - 2016 - Ethics and Education 11 (1):17-28.
    Many teacher candidates get their first taste of life as a full-time teacher in their practicums, during which they confront a host of challenges, pedagogical and ethical. Because ethics is fundamental to the connection between teachers and students, teacher candidates are often required to negotiate dilemmas in ways that keep with the ethical ideals espoused both by the professional body and the community at large. Presenting the case of a teacher candidate who finds herself emotionally depleted in her devotion to (...)
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  47. Searching for a Mahāyāna Social Ethic.David W. Chappell - 1996 - Journal of Religious Ethics 24 (2):351 - 375.
    Mahāyāna ethics has a threefold emphasis: avoiding all evil, cultivating good, and saving all beings. Most Western studies of Buddhist ethics have used Pali and Sanskrit sources to examine the first two components, which are based on monastic codes for avoiding wrong doing and attain- ing virtue. Among the few studies of the third category, which includes Buddhist social ethics, East Asian Mahāyāna materials have been sadly lacking despite the Mahāyāna rhetoric about saving all beings. To correct this deficiency, this (...)
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  48. East Meets West: Cross-Cultural Perspective in End-of-Life Decision Making From Indian and German Viewpoints. [REVIEW]Subrata Chattopadhyay & Alfred Simon - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):165-174.
    Culture creates the context within which individuals experience life and comprehend moral meaning of illness, suffering and death. The ways the patient, family and the physician communicate and make decisions in the end-of-life care are profoundly influenced by culture. What is considered as right or wrong in the healthcare setting may depend on the socio-cultural context. The present article is intended to delve into the cross-cultural perspectives in ethical decision making in the end-of-life scenario. We attempt to address the dynamics (...)
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  49. Ethical Ideas in the World Outlook of Swami Vivekananda, Lokamanya B.G. Tilak, and Aurobindo Ghose.I. P. Chelysheva - 1989 - Vostok.
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  50. Morality Beside and Beyond Religion: An Indian Approach to Morality.John B. Chethimattam - 1977 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 51:87-104.
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