This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:

20 found
Order:
  1. added 2019-06-18
    The Vindication of Tarka as a Pramāṇa in Jaina Philosophy.Arvind Jaiswal - 2019 - Śramaṇa 69 (1):61-68.
    This paper encapsulates the debate as to whether or not tarka is an additional source of knowledge. In this regard, Jaina thinkers opine that they are, unlike Buddhists and Nyāya thinkers, an additional source of knowledge, for what we come to know through tarka is not known through any other means of knowledge. En route, Jaina’s understanding of tarka is put forth, thereafter their criticism of others’ understanding is supplied. Eventually, some recent discussions over this debate are intimated that seem (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2019-03-09
    Eastern Proto-Logics.Fabien Schang - 2016 - In Jean-Yves Beziau, Mihir Chakraborty & Soma Dutta (eds.), New Directions in Paraconsistent Logic: 5th WCP, Kolkata, India, February 2014. pp. 529-552.
    An alternative semantic framework is proposed in the following to reconstruct and make sense of “Eastern logics”: a Question-Answer Semantics (thereafter: QAS), including a set of questions-answers and a finite number of ensuing non-Fregean logical values. Thus, meaning is provided by yes-no answers to corresponding questions about relevant properties. These logical values help to show that the saptabhaṅgī (and its dual, viz., the Buddhist Mādhyamaka catuṣkoṭi) is not a many-valued paraconsistent logic but, rather, a one-valued proto-logic: a constructive machinery that (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. added 2019-03-09
    A One-Valued Logic for Non-One-Sidedness.Fabien Schang - 2013 - International Journal of Jaina Studies 9 (1):1-25.
    Does it make sense to employ modern logical tools for ancient philosophy? This well-known debate2 has been re-launched by the indologist Piotr Balcerowicz, questioning those who want to look at the Eastern school of Jainism with Western glasses. While plainly acknowledging the legitimacy of Balcerowicz's mistrust, the present paper wants to propose a formal reconstruction of one of the well-known parts of the Jaina philosophy, namely: the saptabhangi, i.e. the theory of sevenfold predication. Before arguing for this formalist approach to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. added 2019-02-04
    Recapture, Transparency, Negation and a Logic for the Catuskoti.Adrian Kreutz - 2019 - Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):67-92.
    The recent literature on Nāgārjuna’s catuṣkoṭi centres around Jay Garfield’s (2009) and Graham Priest’s (2010) interpretation. It is an open discussion to what extent their interpretation is an adequate model of the logic for the catuskoti, and the Mūla-madhyamaka-kārikā. Priest and Garfield try to make sense of the contradictions within the catuskoti by appeal to a series of lattices – orderings of truth-values, supposed to model the path to enlightenment. They use Anderson & Belnaps's (1975) framework of First Degree Entailment. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. added 2018-10-27
    Understanding a Philosophical Text. The Problem of “Meaning” in Jayanta’s Nyāyamañjarī, Book 5.Elisa Freschi & Artemij Keidan - 2017 - In Patrick McAllister (ed.), Reading Bhaṭṭa Jayanta on Buddhist Nominalism. Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. pp. 251-290.
    The authors make an attempt to comparatively analyse some stances of the Old Indian philosophy of language, exemplified by the Medieval Indian author Jayanta, along with the Western tradition of the analytical philosophy of language, and to highlight the differences as well as the similarities. The main focus is on Jayanta's discussion of the meaning vs. reference problem.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. added 2018-02-23
    Metonymy and Metaphor as Verbal Postulation: The Epistemic Status of Non-Literal Speech in Indian Philosophy.Malcolm Keating - 2017 - Journal of World Philosophies 2 (1).
    In this paper, I examine Kumārila Bha ṭṭ a's account of figurative language in Tantravārttika 1.4.11-17, arguing that, for him, both metonymy and metaphor crucially involve verbal postulation, a knowledge-conducive cognitive process which draws connections between concepts without appeal to speaker intention, but through compositional and contextual elements. It is with the help of this cognitive process that we can come to have knowledge of what is meant by a sentence in context. In addition, the paper explores the relationship between (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. added 2018-02-23
    (Close) the Door, the King (Is Going): The Development of Elliptical Resolution in Bhāṭṭa Mīmāṃsā.Malcolm Keating - 2017 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 45 (5):911-938.
    This paper examines three commentaries on the Śabdapariccheda in Kumārila Bhaṭṭa’s Ślokavārttika, along with the the seventeenth century Bhāṭṭa Mīmāṃsā work, the Mānameyodaya. The focus is the Mīmāṃsā principle that only sentences communicate qualified meanings and Kumārila’s discussion of a potential counter-example to this claim–single words which appear to communicate such content. I argue that there is some conflict among commentators over precisely what Kumārila describes with the phrase sāmarthyād anumeyetvād, although he is most likely describing ellipsis completion through arthāpatti. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. added 2017-09-12
    Buddhist Philosophy of Logic.Koji Tanaka - 2013 - In Steven Michael Emmanuel (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 320-330.
    Logic in Buddhist Philosophy concerns the systematic study of anumāna (often translated as inference) as developed by Dignāga (480-540 c.e.) and Dharmakīti (600-660 c.e.). Buddhist logicians think of inference as an instrument of knowledge (pramāṇa) and, thus, logic is considered to constitute part of epistemology in the Buddhist tradition. According to the prevalent 20th and early 21st century ‘Western’ conception of logic, however, logical study is the formal study of arguments. If we understand the nature of logic to be formal, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. added 2017-09-04
    The Nyaya-Sutra: Selections with Early Commentaries.Matthew Dasti & Stephen Phillips - 2017 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Often translated simply as "logic," the Sanskrit word _nyāya_ means "rule of reasoning" or "method of reasoning." Texts from the school of classical Indian philosophy that bears this name are concerned with cognition, reasoning, and the norms that govern rational debate. This translation of selections from the early school of Nyāya focuses on its foundational text, the _Nyāya-sūtra_, with excerpts from the early commentaries. It will be welcomed by specialists and non-specialists alike seeking an accessible text that both represents some (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. added 2017-01-03
    The Cow is to Be Tied Up: Sort-Shifting in Classical Indian Philosophy.Keating Malcolm - 2013 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 30 (4):311-332.
    This paper undertakes textual exegesis and rational reconstruction of Mukula Bhaṭṭa’s Abhidhā-vṛttta-mātṛkā, or “The Fundamentals of the Communicative Function.” The treatise was written to refute Ānandavardhana’s claim, made in the Dhvanyāloka, that there is a third “power” of words, vyañjanā (suggestion), beyond the two already accepted by traditional Indian philosophy: abhidhā (denotation) and lakṣaṇā(indication).1 I argue that the explanation of lakṣaṇā as presented in his text contains internal tensions, although it may still be a compelling response to Ānandavardhana.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. added 2016-07-24
    Some (Critical) Remarks on Priest's Dialetheist Reading of Nagarjuna.Goran Kardaš - 2015 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 11 (2):35--49.
    Graham Priest in collaboration with J. Garfield and Y. Deguchi (henceforth: DGP) wrote several articles and responses arguing that the Buddhist philosopher Nagarjuna was a dialetheist thinker, i.e. that he not just identified and exposed certain contradictions but that he embraced it. These contradictions, according to DGP, always occur ``at the limits of thought'' i.e. when a certain view at the same time transcends the limit (``transcendence'') and is within that limit (``closure''). In Nagarjuna's case, these limital contradictions arise at (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. added 2016-04-22
    Reconsidering Classical Indian Thoughts.Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) - 2011 - Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    Recent years have seen the beginning of a radical reassessment of the philosophical literature of ancient and classical India. The analytical techniques of contemporary philosophy are being deployed towards a fresh and original interpretation of the texts. This rational rather than mystical approach towards Indian philosophical theories has resulted in a need to work which explains afresh its central methods, courses and devices. It is with this spirit of thought and background that I want to publish a book to discuss (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. added 2015-11-14
    Mīmāṃsā Deontic Logic: Proof Theory and Applications.Agata Ciabattoni, Francesco Antonio Genco, Björn Lellmann & Elisa Freschi - 2015 - In Hans De Nivelle (ed.), Automated Reasoning with Analytic Tableaux and Related Methods. Springer. pp. 323--338.
  14. added 2014-03-25
    Intrinsic Validity Reconsidered: A Sympathetic Study of the MÄ«māMsaka Inversion of Buddhist Epistemology. [REVIEW]Dan Arnold - 2001 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 29 (5/6):589-675.
  15. added 2013-09-16
    Methods of Philosophical Inquiry in Upanishads.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2012 - International Journal of Multidisciplinary Educational Research 1 (2):57-62.
    Philosophy is a subject which does not concerned only to an expert or specialist. It appears that there is probably no human being who does not philosophise. Good philosophy expands one’s imagination as some philosophy is close to us, whoever we are. Then of course some is further away, and some is further still, and some is very alien indeed. We raise questions about the assumptions, presuppositions, or definitions upon which a field of inquiry is based, and these questions can (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. added 2013-05-16
    The Arrival of Navya-Nyāya Techniques in Varanasi.Johannes Bronkhorst, Bogdan Diaconescu & Malhar Kulkarni - 2013 - In Kuruvilla Pandikattu Sj & Binoy Pichalakkattu Sj (eds.), An Indian Ending: Rediscovering the Grandeur of Indian Heritage for a Sustainable Future. Essays in Honour of Professor Dr. John Vattanky SJ On Completing Eighty Years. Serials Publications.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. added 2013-05-16
    Debating Verbal Cognition: The Theory of the Principal Qualificand (Mukyaviśeṣya) in Classical Indian Thought.Bogdan Diaconescu - 2012 - Motilal Banarsidass.
    The intellectual culture of India presents us with highly elaborated theories of verbal cognition, known in Sanskrit philosophical literature under the generic name of sabdabodha. The theory explored in this book represents the content of the cognition derived from linguistic utterances as a paraphrase centered on a meaning element-the principal qualificand, which is qualified by other meaning elements. Thinkers of the Mimamsa, Nyaya and Vyakarana schools concern themselves with this topic, situated at the interface between epistemology, linguistics, scriptural exegesis and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. added 2012-04-10
    The Argumentative Tradition in Indian Philosophy.Balaganapathi Devarakonda - 2008-09 - Journal of Philosophy, Culture and Traditions 5:173-186.
    A spirit of disintegration and disunity is conspicuous on the contemporary social, as well as philosophical scene. There is a celebration of fragments and differences. In such a scenario, no less than a person like Amartya Sen, an eminent economist and a Noble Laureate rose to the occasion and traced out the roots and the space for a democratic discourse that has been sustained in the Indian philosophical tradition. It is laudable that he opened up a discussion that will strengthen (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. added 2012-01-06
    The Elements of Indian Logic.B. L. Atreya - 1962 - Moradabad, Darshana Printers.
  20. added 2011-01-21
    Place of Logic in Indian Philosophy.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2015 - Lokayata: Journal of Positive Philosophy 2:39-49.
    The title of the present paper might arouse some curiosity among the minds of the readers. The very first question that arises in this respect is whether India produced any logic in the real sense of the term as has been used in the West. This paper is centered only on the three systems of Indian philosophy namely Nyāya, Buddhism and Jainism. We have been talking of Indian philosophy, Indian religion, Indian culture and Indian spirituality, but not that which are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark