About this topic
Summary Indian Philosophy encompasses the systems of thought and reflection that developed on the Indian subcontinent. They include philosophical systems generally classified as orthodox (astika, from the Sanskrit asti "there is") such as Nyāya ("Rule" or "Method"), Vaiśeṣika ("Particular"), Saṃkhya ("Enumeration" or "Number"), Yoga ("Union"), Mīmāṃsā ("Reflection" or "Critical Investigation") and Vedanta ("conclusion of the Veda"). They are classified as orthodox because they rely on the authority of the Vedas (an ancient collection of hymns of religio-philosophical nature). In contrast, the heterodox (nāstika) systems of thought reject the authority of the Vedas and the superiority of Brahmins in matters of philosophical reflection. Besides Buddhism, the other heterodox schools include the Jainas ("Followers of Conquerors", from the Sanskrit verb ji "to conquer"), the ascetic Ājīvikas, and the Cārvākas materialists. Given the diversity of views, theories, and doctrines espoused by philosophers on the Indian subcontinent, there is no unifying thread or single characteristic that would be common to all. Although all the orthodox systems profess some allegiance to the Vedas, they range widely in their interpretations of Vedic statements and pursue their speculative ventures unhindered by tradition (the acceptance of the Vedas is often just a convenient device for a philosopher to gain acceptance in orthodox circles). Among the key concepts of Indian Philosophy are those of karma ("action," which addresses the moral efficiency of human actions), atman ("self," which stands for the sense of an absolute or transcendental spirit or self) and its countervailing notion of anatman ("not-self") in Buddhism, mokṣa ("liberation," conceived as the highest ideal of moral and spiritual cultivation), and the similarly formed ideal of nirvāṇa ("cessation") in Buddhism. A great deal of philosophical speculation in India is concerned with establishing reliable sources of knowing (pramāṇas) such that metaphysical concerns about the nature of reality are seldom pursued in isolation from logical and epistemological concerns about the nature of knowledge and its sources. Indian philosophy is comparable in the range and scope of its metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical concerns with Western philosophy, although philosophers in India have also pursued problems that their Western counterparts never did. Examples include such matters as the source (utpatti) and apprehension (jñapti) of reliable cognitions (prāmāṇya). Likewise, there are problems central to Western philosophy (e.g., whether knowledge arises from experience or from reason) that philosophers in India did not pursue, and important distinctions (such as that between analytic and synthetic judgments) they did not make.  
Key works Refer to the subcategories
Introductions The vast and broad scope of Indian philosophy defies an easy introduction. However, a broad surveys of key concepts, figures, and areas of Indian philosophy can be found in Potter 1970.
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  1. Hawley’s Sūr—and Beyond: A Review Article of Recent Publications (and More) by John Stratton Hawley.John E. Cort - forthcoming - International Journal of Hindu Studies.
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  2. The Mothers and Daughters of Bhakti: Janābāī in Marathi Literature.Madhuri Deshmukh - forthcoming - International Journal of Hindu Studies.
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  3. Poetry and the Play of the Goddess: Theology in Jayaratha’s Alaṃkāravimarśinī.James D. Reich - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-10.
    The beginning of Jayaratha’s commentary on Ruyyaka’s Alaṃkārasarvasva contains a long digression on the nature of the goddess Parā Vāc, “Highest Speech,” referred to in Ruyyaka’s benedictory verse. This is an unusual choice in a text on poetics, and attention to Jayaratha’s religious context reveals that the digression is based closely on Abhinavagupta’s Parātrīśikāvivaraṇa, a tantric commentary. Jayaratha models his opening passage on this text in order to bolster an argument he wants to make about poetry, namely that poetry is (...)
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  4. Mobility, Adaptability, and Accessibility: “Cute” Hanumān Figures Among Surinamese Hindu Children in The Netherlands.Priya Swamy & Albertina Nugteren - forthcoming - International Journal of Hindu Studies.
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  5. Dharmamegha in Yoga and Yogācāra: The Revision of a Superlative Metaphor.Karen O’Brien-Kop - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-31.
    The Pātañjalayogaśāstra concludes with a description of the pinnacle of yoga practice: a state of samādhi called dharmamegha, cloud of dharma. Yet despite the structural importance of dharmamegha in the soteriology of Pātañjala yoga, the śāstra itself does not say much about this term. Where we do find dharmamegha discussed, however, is in Buddhist yogācāra, and more broadly in early Mahāyāna soteriology, where it represents the apex of attainment and the superlative statehood of a bodhisattva. Given the relative paucity of (...)
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  6. The Forgotten Consort: The Goddess and Kāmadeva in the Early Worship of Tripurasundarī.Anna A. Golovkova - forthcoming - International Journal of Hindu Studies.
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  7. Jayarāśi Bhaṭṭa: A Sceptic or Materialist?Piotr Balcerowicz - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-40.
    The paper examines the Tattvôpaplava-siṁha of Jayarāśi Bhaṭṭa, and presents an analysis of his positive arguments that can be traced in the work. Despite the widely held opinion that Jayarāśi was a sceptic or held no positive opinions, the author concludes that, first, Jayarāśi does not fit a standard description of a sceptic. What may appear as an approach to philosophical problems, typical of a sceptic, turns out to be Jayarāśi’s particular method of critical examination on the part of a (...)
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  8. Prajñākaramati on Śāntideva’s Case Against Anger: A Translation of Bodhicaryāvatāra-Pañjikā VI.1-69.Charles Goodman & Aaron Schultz - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-38.
    A translation of a major part of Prajñākaramati’s canonical commentary on the Perfection of Patient Endurance chapter of Śāntideva’s Bodhicaryāvatāra. The introduction clarifies the importance of the commentary and explores what can be learned from it. Prajñākaramati’s comments help illuminate the meaning of the verses and provide evidence for the view that the Bodhicaryāvatāra should be understood as offering not just meditation exercises, but also rational arguments that can be evaluated as philosophy.
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  9. Some Reflections on the Meaning of Dīkṣā in Kerala According to Mātṛsadbhāvatantra.Maciej Karasinski - forthcoming - International Journal of Hindu Studies.
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  10. The Rādhāsoāmī Theory of Subtle Body as an Expression of Religious Inclusivism.Jarosław Zapart - forthcoming - International Journal of Hindu Studies.
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  11. A Goddess Who Unites and Empowers: Śrīvidyā as a Link Between Tantric Traditions of Modern Kerala—Some Considerations.Maciej Karasinski - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-23.
    The paper considers the differences between the various Tantric traditions of Kerala and presents observations that emerged from my field research on the so-called Śākta Tantra of Kerala. This tradition incorporates the ritualistic practices of Kashmirian Śaivism or, more precisely, it integrates Krama-Trika ritualism with the folk mythology of Kerala and Śrīvidyā theology. This study presents the hypothesis that the Śākta tradition of Kerala could have been influenced directly by proponents of Kashmirian Śaivism and indirectly by Śrīvidyā. The Tantric texts (...)
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  12. Consciousness and Cognition in Classical Sāṃkhya Metaphysics.Raquel Ferrández Formoso - 2020 - Indialogs 2020 (7):63-78.
    This article explores the psychological dimension of classical Sāṃkhya philosophy, on the basis of its canonical treatise, Sāṃkhyakārikā of Īśvarakṛṣṇa (4th Century AD). The strong dualism defended by this ancient metaphysics establishes a division between what we will designate as the phenomenon of consciousness (puruṣa) and the cognitive phenomena (prakṛti). According to our approach, Sāṃkhya seems to offer a mechanical model of mind by means of an introspective self-research. In fact, we will argue that in this system of thought, mind (...)
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  13. Is Yogic Suicide Useless? The Practice of utkrānti in Some Tantric Vaiṣṇava and Śaiva Sources.Silvia Schwarz Linder - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-19.
    The aim of this article is to discuss the practice of yogic suicide, as it occurs in some Tantric Vaiṣṇava sources, as well as in the Mālinīvijayottaratantra, particularly as concerns the affinities between the latter and certain Pāñcarātra saṃhitās. After a summary account of the contents of the text-passages where this practice is either described or alluded to, some of the problems raised by these texts are identified and provisional working hypothesis are put forward. In the first place, it is (...)
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  14. Rejecting Monism: Dvaita Vedānta’s Engagement with the Bhāgavatapurāṇa.Kiyokazu Okita - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-19.
    Madhvācārya’s Bhāgavatatātparyanirṇaya is the oldest Bhāgavata commentary available to us, most probably predating the Advaitic commentary of Śrīdhara. Thus Madhva’s commentary occupies a crucial place in the development of the Bhāgavata tradition. In this paper, I examine Madhva’s commentary on the first verse of the Bhāgavatapurāṇa, focusing on his exegesis. In so doing, I shall point out how Madhva emphasizes what are arguably the two most important doctrines of Dvaita Vedānta, namely, Viṣṇu’s absolute independence and the reality of the world. (...)
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  15. When Texts Clash: Mīmāṃsā Thinkers on Conflicting Prescriptions and Prohibitions.Shishir Saxena - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-35.
    The Mīmāṃsā mission of disambiguating Vedic texts led the thinkers of the tradition to confront several instances of apparently conflicting Vedic commands. Consider the two cases: ‘give alms daily’ vs ‘do not give alms during ritual X’, and ‘never harm another’ vs ‘sacrifice an animal during ritual Y’. Each command in these two cases is derived from the Vedas and Mīmāṃsā authors thus attempted to resolve such cases of deontic conflict by putting forth hermeneutic solutions, without taking recourse to any (...)
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  16. Through the Logician’s Strainer: A Nyāya Technique.Nirmalya Guha - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-16.
    The strainer tests the strength of a definition of a particular kind. Suppose the definition D is stated in terms of an absence, and x is a definiendum of D. The strainer collects each x-token or x-individual that dissatisfies D in a specific case. Then, all the x-individuals put together would be equivalent to the type x. Hence—one would be forced to conclude that—in a sense, x dissatisfies D. This is a case of under-application of D, since, despite being a (...)
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  17. Horror Vacui : Metaphysical Yogācāra Reaction to Madhyamaka Antimetaphysical Emptiness.Giuseppe Ferraro - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-26.
    In the first part of this paper I critically examine some of the main interpretations of “classical” Yogācāra philosophy of Maitreya, Asaṅga and Vasubandhu. Among these interpretations, based on extant textual and contextual data, I consider philologically unlikely both metaphysical-idealistic readings, which ascribe to these authors the view that ultimate reality is a mental or subjective stuff, and epistemological-idealistic readings which advocate that either Yogācāra suspends judgment on the existence of the extramental or that it maintains that the extramental exists (...)
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  18. The Kāvyaprakāśa in the Benares-Centered Network of Sanskrit Learning.Patrick T. Cummins - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-32.
    This article tells an intellectual history of Mammaṭa Bhaṭṭa’s Kāvyaprakāśa in the Benares-Centered Network of Sanskrit Learning from c. 1600–1750 CE. The core narrative proposed herein is that the discourse on Sanskrit Poetics reaches a bifurcated state by the 1400s and 1500s: the Kāvyaprakāśa commentarial tradition constitutes a distinct domain, wherein commentators debate exclusively among themselves on lower-order issues. This period of normalcy is ruptured by Appayya Dīkṣita, who effectively destabilizes the discourse, overhauling the conventional wisdom via his empiricist polemics (...)
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  19. Conscious of Everything or Consciousness Without Objects? A Paradox of Nirvana.Tse-fu Kuan - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-23.
    Seemingly contrary ideas of Nirvana are found in early Buddhist literature. Whereas some texts describe one who attains Nirvana as being conscious of everything, others depict Nirvana as a state in which consciousness has no object but emptiness or Nirvana. In this paper I deal with this paradox of Nirvana consciousness by exploring the correlations between several statements in early Buddhist texts. A number of sutta passages are cited to show that they contain doctrinal elements which, when considered collectively, may (...)
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  20. Quisquis Deum intellegit, Deus Fit: The Syntax of upa √ās in the Bṛhadāraṇyaka and Chāndogya Upaniṣad.Paolo Visigalli - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (2):191-228.
    Verbal forms of upa √ās are one of the characteristic features of Upaniṣadic diction. While several studies have investigated their semantics, very little attention has been given to their syntax. A quick comparison of different translations shows that there is no agreement among Upaniṣadic interpreters regarding the syntax of upa √ās. By considering all its occurrences in the Bṛhadāraṇyaka and Chāndogya Upaniṣads, this paper offers the first systematic study of its syntax. It is hoped that the analytic model proposed here (...)
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  21. The Concept of Manas in Jaina Philosophy.Jayandra Soni - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (2):315-328.
    The first time Umāsvāti uses the word manas in his Tattvārtha-sūtra, the standard work for matters concerning Jaina philosophy, is when he lists the means of knowledge: mati, śruta, avadhi, manaḥ-paryāya and kevala. These are the pramāṇas. In TAS 1, 14 mati or sense perception is said to be caused by indriya and aninindriya; Pūjyapāda’s commentary says that anindriya, antaḥ-karaṇa and manas are synonyms. This obviously raises questions about the specific role and function of the manas/anindriya in mati, manaḥ-paryāya and (...)
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  22. Diagrams for Navya-Nyāya.Jim Burton - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (2):229-254.
    Although a number of authors have used diagrams extensively in their studies of Navya-Nyāya, they have done so to explain and illustrate concepts, not with the goal of reasoning with the diagrams themselves. Adherents of diagrammatic reasoning have made claims for its potential by pointing to key structural correspondences between diagrams and logical concepts, arguably lacking in sentential representations, and describing these relations using concepts such as “well matchedness” and “iconicity”. A canonical example of this iconicity is the use of (...)
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  23. Abhinavagupta on Reflection (Pratibimba) in the Tantrāloka.Mrinal Kaul - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (2):161-189.
    In the celebrated tantric manual, the Tantrāloka, Abhinavagupta and his commentator Jayaratha establish a non-dual Śaiva theory of reflection using the key metaphors of light and reflective awareness. This paper attempts to explain the philosophical problem of reflection from the standpoint of these non-dual Śaivas. It also evaluates the problem in its hermeneutical context, analysing multiple layers of meaning and interpretation. Is the metaphor of reflection only a way of explaining the particular currents of the Śaiva phenomenology represented by the (...)
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  24. Ceṭṭiyār Vedānta: Fashioning Hindu Selves in Colonial South India.Eric Steinschneider - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):101-118.
    This article seeks to pluralize current scholarly perceptions of what constitutes Advaita Vedānta in colonial India. It suggests, in particular, that the tendency to concentrate on the so-called “neo-Vedānta” of a handful of cosmopolitan reformers has obscured other kinds of innovative Vedānta-inspired discourses that have significantly shaped the formation of modern Hindu consciousness. These discourses are indebted, in ways that are only beginning to be understood, to religious traditions rooted in particular regions and vernacular languages. The article illustrates this argument (...)
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  25. Greater Advaita Vedānta: The Case of Sundardās.Michael S. Allen - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):49-78.
    To understand the history of Advaita Vedānta and its rise to prominence, we need to devote more attention to what might be termed “Greater Advaita Vedānta,” or Advaita Vedānta as expressed outside the standard canon of Sanskrit philosophical works. Elsewhere I have examined the works of Niścaldās, whose Hindi-language Vicār-sāgar was once referred to by Swami Vivekananda as the most influential book of its day. In this paper, I look back to one of Niścaldās’s major influences: Sundardās, a well-known Hindi (...)
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  26. The Persian Writings on Vedānta Attributed to Banwālīdās Walī.Supriya Gandhi - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):79-99.
    The Mughal court was the main sponsor of Persian works on Vedānta, broadly conceived, from the late sixteenth until the mid-seventeenth century. Thereafter, the audience for such works shifted outside the court. Several Hindus literate in Persian composed or circulated Vedāntic writings. This article surveys three hitherto neglected Persian texts treating Vedānta that appear to have been composed independently from court sponsorship. All three are attributed to Banwālīdās Walī. They comprise the Gulzār-i ḥāl [Rose-garden of ecstatic states], which is itself (...)
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  27. On Jain Anekantavada and Pluralism in Philosophy of Mathematics.Landon D. C. Elkind - 2019 - International School for Jain Studies-Transactions 2 (3):13-20.
    I claim that a relatively new position in philosophy of mathematics, pluralism, overlaps in striking ways with the much older Jain doctrine of anekantavada and the associated doctrines of nyayavada and syadvada. I first outline the pluralist position, following this with a sketch of the Jain doctrine of anekantavada. I then note the srrong points of overlaps and the morals of this comparison of pluralism and anekantavada.
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  28. Pluralizing the Non-dual: Multilingual Perspectives on Advaita Vedānta, 1560–1847.Jonathan R. Peterson - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):1-7.
    With a textual record spanning dozens of languages—to say nothing of its oral histories—Advaita Vedānta’s multilingual archive presents obvious and daunting challenges for scholars of South Asian intellectual and religious histories. The papers in this issue build on recent multilingual and contextual approaches to South Asian intellectual history by reading a rich corpus of Advaita Vedānta material in Persian, Marathi, Tamil, Sanskrit and Braj Bhasha. In bringing these sources and their authors into conversation with one another, this issue acknowledges Advaita (...)
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  29. Pluralizing the Non-dual: Multilingual Perspectives on Advaita Vedānta, 1560–1847.Jonathan R. Peterson - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):1-7.
    With a textual record spanning dozens of languages—to say nothing of its oral histories—Advaita Vedānta’s multilingual archive presents obvious and daunting challenges for scholars of South Asian intellectual and religious histories. The papers in this issue build on recent multilingual and contextual approaches to South Asian intellectual history by reading a rich corpus of Advaita Vedānta material in Persian, Marathi, Tamil, Sanskrit and Braj Bhasha. In bringing these sources and their authors into conversation with one another, this issue acknowledges Advaita (...)
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  30. Greater Advaita Vedānta: The Case of Sundardās.Michael S. Allen - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):49-78.
    To understand the history of Advaita Vedānta and its rise to prominence, we need to devote more attention to what might be termed “Greater Advaita Vedānta,” or Advaita Vedānta as expressed outside the standard canon of Sanskrit philosophical works. Elsewhere I have examined the works of Niścaldās, whose Hindi-language Vicār-sāgar was once referred to by Swami Vivekananda as the most influential book of its day. In this paper, I look back to one of Niścaldās’s major influences: Sundardās, a well-known Hindi (...)
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  31. A Goddess and a Pañcāyat President: Narrative, Sanctity, and Authority in Rural Tamil Nadu.Amanda Randhawa Greenbaum - 2019 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 23 (3):283-308.
    In an examination of the interdependent relationship between narrative and ritual, this article discusses a ritual dilemma solved through narrative to explore how narrative sustains authority usually enacted, validated, and supported by ritual practice. In the Tamil village of Nagamalai Pudukkottai, Jeyakumar, the pañcāyat president, must perform as a cāmiyāti possessed by the village’s most powerful form of divinity, Taṭātakai Ammaṉ, to substantiate his family’s long lineage of traditional authority. For seventeen years, however, Jeyakumar was unable to substantiate his authoritative (...)
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  32. The Truth of Dharma and the Dharma of Truth: Reflections on Hinduism as a Dharmic Faith.Julius Lipner - 2019 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 23 (3):213-237.
    This article discusses what it might mean to characterize traditional Hinduism as a dharmic faith in relation to the concepts of truth and its opposite, without however expatiating on supposed contrasts between Hinduism and the “Abrahamic” faiths. The argument is conducted by recognizing two senses to anṛtam, namely, “non-truth” and “falsehood,” in contrast to satyam; and the method used is inductive in that a historically well-known episode of the Mahābhārata—the story of Kauśika and the bandits—and its authoritative interpretation by the (...)
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  33. Rādhātantram: Rādhā as Guru in the Service of the Great Goddess.Rebecca J. Manring - 2019 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 23 (3):259-282.
    The Rādhātantram can serve as a tool with which to examine textual and doctrinal appropriations that took place between Vaiṣṇavas and Śāktas in precolonial Bengal in their ongoing competition for membership and patronage. The unknown author of the Rādhātantram borrowed some basic Kṛṣṇa mythology and superimposed it on a Tantra framework. In so doing he changed Kṛṣṇa’s theological identity and his relationship to Rādhā, the devotee’s relationship to the couple, and, more significantly, the couple’s relationship to the cosmos. Rādhā’s identity (...)
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  34. India and Beyond: Vedism, Hinduism, and the Continuity of Culture.Herman Tull - 2019 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 23 (3):325-330.
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  35. Rekindling the Gāyatrī Mantra: Rabindranath Tagore and “Our Veda”.Brian A. Hatcher - 2019 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 23 (3):239-258.
    How is ancient Hindu wisdom made meaningful in new contexts? What might draw a modern Bengali poet to the cadences and mystic meaning of the Gāyatrī mantra? Through what processes of modern interpretation and religio- political aspiration was the ritually centered daily prayer of the twice-born rendered into universal truth for the twentieth century? This article attempts to answer such questions by exploring the reimagining of the Gāyatrī’s meaning in the poetry and expository writings of Rabindranath Tagore. The goal is (...)
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  36. The Modern Bhagavad Gītā: Caste in Twentieth-Century Commentaries.J. E. Llewellyn - 2019 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 23 (3):309-323.
    By the twentieth century the Bhagavad Gītā had become the single most important Hindu book. A clear indication of its popularity is that many of the major thinkers of that century wrote about it, often in book-length commentaries. In this article, we will analyze what Bal Gangadhar Tilak, Sri Aurobindo, Mohandas K. Gandhi, and Svāmī Śivānanda have to say about caste in their books about the Bhagavad Gītā. In colonial India, caste was understood to be a problem, at once critical (...)
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  37. Ceṭṭiyār Vedānta: Fashioning Hindu Selves in Colonial South India.Eric Steinschneider - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):101-118.
    This article seeks to pluralize current scholarly perceptions of what constitutes Advaita Vedānta in colonial India. It suggests, in particular, that the tendency to concentrate on the so-called “neo-Vedānta” of a handful of cosmopolitan reformers has obscured other kinds of innovative Vedānta-inspired discourses that have significantly shaped the formation of modern Hindu consciousness. These discourses are indebted, in ways that are only beginning to be understood, to religious traditions rooted in particular regions and vernacular languages. The article illustrates this argument (...)
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  38. The Persian Writings on Vedānta Attributed to Banwālīdās Walī.Supriya Gandhi - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):79-99.
    The Mughal court was the main sponsor of Persian works on Vedānta, broadly conceived, from the late sixteenth until the mid-seventeenth century. Thereafter, the audience for such works shifted outside the court. Several Hindus literate in Persian composed or circulated Vedāntic writings. This article surveys three hitherto neglected Persian texts treating Vedānta that appear to have been composed independently from court sponsorship. All three are attributed to Banwālīdās Walī. They comprise the Gulzār-i ḥāl [Rose-garden of ecstatic states], which is itself (...)
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  39. Pluralizing the Non-Dual: Multilingual Perspectives on Advaita Vedānta, 1560–1847.Jonathan R. Peterson - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):1-7.
    With a textual record spanning dozens of languages—to say nothing of its oral histories—Advaita Vedānta’s multilingual archive presents obvious and daunting challenges for scholars of South Asian intellectual and religious histories. The papers in this issue build on recent multilingual and contextual approaches to South Asian intellectual history by reading a rich corpus of Advaita Vedānta material in Persian, Marathi, Tamil, Sanskrit and Braj Bhasha. In bringing these sources and their authors into conversation with one another, this issue acknowledges Advaita (...)
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  40. On the Road to Renaissance? [REVIEW]Jakob De Roover - 2016 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 20 (3):373-383.
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  41. Introduction to Special Issue: Stotra, Hymns of Praise in Indian Literature.Jonathan B. Edelmann - 2016 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 20 (3):303-307.
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  42. The Persian Writings on Vedānta Attributed to Banwālīdās Walī.Supriya Gandhi - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):79-99.
    The Mughal court was the main sponsor of Persian works on Vedānta, broadly conceived, from the late sixteenth until the mid-seventeenth century. Thereafter, the audience for such works shifted outside the court. Several Hindus literate in Persian composed or circulated Vedāntic writings. This article surveys three hitherto neglected Persian texts treating Vedānta that appear to have been composed independently from court sponsorship. All three are attributed to Banwālīdās Walī. They comprise the Gulzār-i ḥāl [Rose-garden of ecstatic states], which is itself (...)
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  43. Ritual, Self and Yoga: On the Ways and Goals of Salvation in the Kaṭha Upaniṣad.Dominik Haas - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (5):1019-1052.
    Throughout its history, the renowned Kaṭha Upaniṣad has often been described as being both incoherent and contradictory. The aim of this paper is to show to what purpose the text was created. To this end, it discusses the connection of the three paths to salvation depicted in the text, viz. the Agnicayana, the Upaniṣadic method of self-knowledge, and yoga. The first part retraces how in the Upaniṣads, the Agnicayana was transformed into a non-material or mental ritual and linked with self-knowledge. (...)
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  44. Is There Anything Like Indian Logic? Anumāna, ‘Inference’ and Inference in the Critique of Jayarāśi Bhaṭṭa.Piotr Balcerowicz - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (5):917-946.
    The paper presents an analysis of the anumāna chapter of Jayarāśi’s Tattvôpaplava-siṁha and the nature of his criticism levelled against the anumāna model. The results of the analysis force us to revise our understanding of Jayarāśi Bhaṭṭa as a sceptic. Instead, he emerges as a highly critical philosopher. In addition, the nature of Jayarāśi’s criticism of the anumāna model allow us to conclude that anumāna should not be equated with inference, but rather is its limited subset, and may at best (...)
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  45. A Buddhist Theory of Persistence: Śāntarakṣita and Kamalaśīla on Rebirth.Itsuki Hayashi - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (5):979-1001.
    The so-called Buddhist momentarists, such as Dharmakīrti and his followers, defend the momentariness of all things. However, with equal force they also defend the persistence of all things, not just within a single lifetime but over an indefinite cycle of rebirth. Naturally, they have an interesting theory of persistence, according to which things persist without being self-identical over time. The theory is best presented in the Lokāyatāparīkṣā chapter of Śāntarakṣita’s Tattvasaṃgraha and Kamalaśīla’s Paṅjikā, as they clearly articulate the criteria of (...)
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  46. The Amaraughaprabodha: New Evidence on the Manuscript Transmission of an Early Work on Haṭha- and Rājayoga.Jason Birch - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (5):947-977.
    The Amaraughaprabodha is a Sanskrit Śaiva yoga text attributed by its colophons to Gorakṣanātha. It was first published by Kalyani Devi Mallik in 1954 and has been discussed in various secondary sources. Most notably, Christian Bouy identified this work as a source text for the Haṭhapradīpikā of Svātmārāma. This article presents new manuscript evidence for a shorter recension of the Amaraughaprabodha than the one published by Mallik. Comparing the differences between the short and long recensions reveals that the structure of (...)
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  47. Vidyānandin’s Discussion with the Buddhist on Svasaṃvedana, Pratyakṣa and Pramāṇa.Jayandra Soni - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (5):1003-1017.
    Two of the terms in the title are from Vidyānandin’s Tattvārtha-śloka-vārttika, which is his commentary on Umāsvāti’s Tattvārtha-sūtra. Sūtra 6 of the TAS states the following: pramāṇa-nayair adhigamaḥ, ‘knowledge—of the seven categories—is obtained through the pramāṇas and the nayas’). Vidyānandin’s commentary on this sūtra 6 entails a total of 56 ślokas, with his own prose vārttika on each of them in varying lengths. TAŚV 1, 6, 1–8 deal with particulars and universals, for which he uses the synonymous pairs aṃśa/aṃśin and (...)
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  48. Beyond Time, Not Before Time: The Pratyabhijñā Śaiva Critique of Dharmakīrti on the Reality of Beginningless Conceptual Differentiation.Catherine Prueitt - forthcoming - Philosophy East and West 1:1-32.
    This paper, which will form part of a July 2020 special issue on conceptuality and nonconceptuality in Buddhist thought, evaluates the philosophical merits of the Pratyabhijñā Śaiva critique of Dharmakīrti’s stance that the judgment of sameness that constitutes a concept formed via exclusion (apoha) does not require ultimate grounding. For Dharmakīrti (7th century), the judgment of sameness rests on the existence of causally specific particulars that, while themselves lacking any similarity whatsoever, may be practically (but erroneously) judged to have the (...)
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  49. Dharma and Ecology of Hindu Communities: Sustenance and Sustainability.Pankaj Jain - 2016 - Routledge.
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  50. Remaking South Indian Śaivism: Greater Śaiva Advaita and the Legacy of the Śaktiviśiṣṭādvaita Vīraśaiva Tradition.Elaine M. Fisher - 2017 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 21 (3):319-344.
    Śaiva Advaita, or Śivādvaita, is typically regarded as an invention of the late sixteenth-century polymath Appayya Dīkṣita, who is said to have single-handedly revived Śrīkaṇṭha’s commentary on the Brahmasūtras from obscurity. And yet, the theological rapprochement between South Indian Śaivism and Advaita Vedānta philosophy has a much richer history, and one that left few South Indian Śaiva communities untouched by the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This article is an attempt to trace the outlines of what we can call a “Greater (...)
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