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  1. Complete Works of Swami Abhedananda. Abhedānanda - 1967 - Calcutta, Ramakrishna Vedanta Math.
  2. Relevance of Indian Philosophy to Modern Society.Tanaji Acharya - 1990 - Distributor, Indo-Vision.
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  3. Christian Contribution to Indian Philosophy.Anand Amaladass (ed.) - 1995 - Christian Literature Society.
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  4. Call for Papers ``Educations and Their Purposes: A Philosophical Dialogue Among Cultures'' Ninth East-West Philosophers' Conference University of Hawai'i East-West Center May 29–June 11, 2005. [REVIEW]Roger T. Ames - 2004 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 32 (2/3):293-294.
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  5. An Investigation of Moksha in the Advaita Vedanta of Shankara and Gaudapada.Joshua Anderson - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (3):275-287.
    In this article, I suggest that moksha (liberation or enlightenment) in Advaita Vedanta is best understood psychologically. A psychological understanding is not only consistent with the Advaita Vedanta articulated by Shankara and Gaudapada, but avoids what will be called the problem of jivan mukti. This article will consist of three main parts. First, I will briefly discuss the metaphysics and ontology of Advaita Vedanta. Next, I will present the problem of jivan mukti, and the Advaitin response to the problem. The (...)
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  6. The Influence of Indian Thought on the Thought of the West. Ashokananda - 1931 - Mayavati, Almora, University Press, Advaita Ashrama.
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  7. The Indian View of History.Pratima Asthana - 1992 - M.G. Publishers.
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  8. Scandals, Cover-Ups, and Other Imagined Occurrences in the Life of Rāmakṙṣṅa: An Examination of Jeffrey Kripal's Kālī's Child. [REVIEW]Svāmī Ātmajñānānanda - 1997 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 1 (2):401-420.
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  9. On the Definition of a Hindu World and its Portrayal: A Review Article. [REVIEW]Greg Bailey - 2007 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 11 (1):99-114.
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  10. Manassuṃ Ātmīyatayuṃ.Maṅṅāṭ Bālacandran - 2011 - Ḍi. Si. Buks.
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  11. T.M.P. Mahadevan.R. Balasubramanian - 1998 - Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.
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  12. Facets of Recent Indian Philosophy.R. Balasubramanian (ed.) - 1994 - Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.
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  13. Letter to Aristotle.James Bardis - forthcoming - In Conference Proceedings of IICAHHawaii2017.
    …A reconstructed imaginal account of Alexander’s (the Great) historical letter to Aristotle pursuant to his (in-) famous meeting with the gymnosophist Dandimus on the paradoxes of Zeno ( presaging those of Nagarjuna ) as a means of presenting a synthesis of the stasis and dynamism implicit in the potential of a phenomenally real world beyond a rigid designation of a chain-of-being taxonomy where animal dignity resides side by side with predator-prey relations and a mind-laden ( theory ) of evolution.
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  14. The Appearance of Emptiness Through Time.Rudolph Bauer - 2012 - Transmission 4.
    This paper focuses on the appearance of emptiness through time.
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  15. Understanding Indian Value System Through Sri Aurobindo’s Education System.Gitanjali Bora & Desh Raj Sirswal - 2011 - The Philosophist 9 (18):July to Dec.2011.
    “Our call is to young India. It is the young who must be the builders of the new world.” Sri Aurobindo -/- India was always rich in the establishment of centers even in Vedic times where the first principles of education were to be found in the Ashrams and Gurukuls and later on in the great universities of Nalanda and Taxila. The term education usually refers to the technical sense and is generally limited to the context of teachers instructing students. (...)
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  16. Perceptual Experience and Concepts in Classical Indian Philosophy.Monima Chadha - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  17. Troubles with a Second Self: The Problem of Other Minds in 11th Century Indian and 20th Century Western Philosophy.Arindam Chakrabarti - 2011 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 1 (1):23-36.
    In contemporary Western analytic philosophy, the classic analogical argument explaining our knowledge of other minds has been rejected. But at least three alternative positive theories of our knowledge of the second person have been formulated: the theory-theory, the simulation theory and the theory of direct empathy. After sketching out the problems faced by these accounts of the ego’s access to the contents of the mind of a “second ego”, this paper tries to recreate one argument given by Abhinavagupta (Shaiva philosopher (...)
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  18. Review of Alternative Standpoints: A Tribute to Kalidas Bhattacharyya. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2016 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (September):673.
    This review brings to the fore the Indian philosopher Kalidas Bhattacharyya. It makes a case for Indian and Asian Studies' scholars to take up the study of Bhattacharya so that his corpus can be used to construct a clear hermeneutic for assessing and accessing Indian texts, say in English and also other English literary texts. Bhattacharyya has been neglected too long by the world.
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  19. Review of Hindu Samskaras: Socio-Religious Study of the Hindu Sacraments.Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2014 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 119 (8):501-2.
    This review addresses issues regarding the very shaping of Hinduism and the resistance that such shaping faces from non-Hindus. Non-Hindu polemic is challenged using Western methods.
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  20. Review of Being Different: An Indian Challenge to Western Universalism. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2013 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 118 (6):407-8.
    Malhotra is generally portrayed by American and European philosophers as a theologian and he is relegated to the backwaters of Hindutva. This review makes a strong case for Malhotra's scholarship and contextualizes him within the domains of philosophy and even Liberation theology. Malhotra's scholarship has been non-pejoratively assessed in this review.
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  21. Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report.Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng - manuscript
    This report highlights and explores five questions that arose from the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, September 21st to 22nd, 2013: 1. How does the understanding of attention in Indian philosophy bear on contemporary western debates? 2. How can we train our attention, and what are the benefits of doing so? 3. Can meditation give us moral knowledge? 4. What can Indian philosophy tell us about how we perceive the world? 5. Are there cross-cultural (...)
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  22. Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question One.Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng - manuscript
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This part of the report explores the question: How does the understanding of attention in Indian philosophy bear on contemporary western debates?
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  23. Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Two.Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng - manuscript
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: How can we train our attention, and what are the benefits of doing so?
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  24. Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Four.Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng - manuscript
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: What can Indian philosophy tell us about how we perceive the world?
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  25. Śrīharṣa.Nilanjan Das - 2018 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  26. Object Reidentification and the Epistemic Role of Attention.Nilanjan Das - 2018 - Ratio 31 (4):402-414.
    Reidentification scepticism is the view that we cannot knowledgeably reidentify previously perceived objects. Amongst classical Indian philosophers, the Buddhists argued for reidentification scepticism. In this essay, I will discuss two responses to this Buddhist argument. The first response, defended by Vācaspati Miśra (9th century CE), is that our outer senses allow us to knowledgeably reidentify objects. I will claim that this proposal is problematic. The second response, due to Jayanta Bhaṭṭa (9th century CE), is that the manas or the inner (...)
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  27. Skepticism in Classical Indian Philosophy.Matthew R. Dasti - forthcoming - In Diego Machuca & Baron Reed (eds.), Skepticism from Antiquity to the Present.
    There are some tantalizing suggestions that Pyrrhonian skepticism has its roots in ancient India. Of them, the most important is Diogenes Laertius’s report that Pyrrho accompanied Alexander to India, where he was deeply impressed by the character of the “naked sophists” he encountered (DL IX 61). Influenced by these gymnosophists, Pyrrho is said to have adopted the practices of suspending judgment on matters of belief and cultivating an indifferent composure amid the vicissitudes of ordinary life. Such conduct, and the attitudes (...)
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  28. A Sketch on Nāgārjuna's Perspectives on "Relation".Krishna Del Toso - 2016 - Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia 57 (133):153-176.
    ABSTRACT The aim of this paper is to provide a sketch on the way Nāgārjuna deals with the idea of 'relation'. The concept of 'relation' as expressed in the Pāli sources is here theoretically systematized according to three patterns: 1. logical, 2. strictly subordinative existential, 3. non-strictly subordinative existential. After having discussed Nāgārjuna's acceptance and treatment of these three patterns, particular attention is paid to the non-strictly subordinative existential relation. This kind of relation is meant to describe the way the (...)
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  29. Some Problems Concerning Textual Reuses in the Madhyamakaratnapradīpa, with a Discussion of the Quotation From Saraha’s Dohākośagīti.Krishna Del Toso - 2015 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 43 (4-5):511-557.
    The aim of the present study is to shed light on why the citation taken from Saraha’s Dohākośagīti and occurring in the Madhyamakaratnapradīpa, chapter 7, opens the door to some fundamental reflections concerning the authority and the “nature” of this latter text. On the basis of a historical and doctrinal analysis, here a new interpretation is put forward, according to which the Madhyamakaratnapradīpa should be considered a tenth century CE handbook, written by some unknown Buddhist teacher perhaps as a manual (...)
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  30. Limitations and Alternatives: Understanding Indian Philosophy.Balaganapathi Devarakonda - 2009 - Calicut University Research Journal, ISSN No. 09723348 (1):47-58.
    This paper attempts to articulate certain inadequacies that are involved in the traditional way of categorizing Indian philosophy and explores alternative approaches, some of which otherwise are not explicitly seen in the treatises of the history of Indian Philosophies. By categorization, I mean, classifying Indian philosophy into two streams, which are traditionally called as astica and nastica or orthodox and heterodox systems. Further, these different schools in the astica Darsanas and nastica Darsanas are usually numbered into six and three respectively. (...)
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  31. Richness of Indian Symbolism and Changing Perspectives.Balaganapathi Devarakonda - 2009 - In Paata Chkheidze, Hoang Thi To & Yaroslav Pasko (eds.), Symbols in Cultures and Identities in a Time of Global Interaction.
    My aim in this paper is to explicate the diversity of Indian Symbolism and to show the changing patterns of symbols. The first part is mostly descriptive and interpretative and tries to bring out the different forms of Indian Symbolism. The second part tries to bring out the different kinds of changes that are possible with regard to symbols.
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  32. The Argumentative Tradition in Indian Philosophy.Balaganapathi Devarakonda - 2008-09 - Journal of Philosophy, Culture and Traditions 5:173-186.
    A spirit of disintegration and disunity is conspicuous on the contemporary social, as well as philosophical scene. There is a celebration of fragments and differences. In such a scenario, no less than a person like Amartya Sen, an eminent economist and a Noble Laureate rose to the occasion and traced out the roots and the space for a democratic discourse that has been sustained in the Indian philosophical tradition. It is laudable that he opened up a discussion that will strengthen (...)
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  33. Dana: A Foundation of the Indian Social Life.Balaganapathi Devarakonda - 2008 - In Sebastian Vt & Geeta Manakatala (eds.), Foundations of Indian Life: Cultural, Religious and Aesthetic Edited by ISBN. 1439201854. Booksurge.
    This paper discusses the concept of Dána or charity as the foundation of Indian Social life. Dána has been in vogue in India since the Vedic times, but it was codified by the smritis which prescribe do’s and don’ts of the life of the individual. Limiting its scope to Yagnavalkya smriti the paper analyses the significance of Dána as a regulative principle of accumulation of wealth.
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  34. On the New Ways of the Late Vedic Hermeneutics: Mīmāṃsā and Navya-Nyāya.Bogdan Diaconescu - 2012 - Asiatische Studien / Études Asiatiques 66 (2):261-306.
    This article aims to follow the process of adoption of Navya-Nyāya techniques of cognitive analysis in the school of Vedic hermeneutics, Mīmāṃsā, in the sixteenth and the seventeenth centuries, in the larger context of the spread of these techniques in India. I shall argue that this process arises in Mīmāṃsā on the sidelines of the Advaita-Dvaita Vedānta controversy in South India, then subsequently flourishes in Varanasi. These techniques are adopted gradually and selectively, for not all the Mīmāṃsā thinkers choose to (...)
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  35. Coscienza e Assoluto. Soggettività e oggettività tra filosofia bergsoniana e pensiero indiano.Giacomo Foglietta & Paolo Taroni - 2012 - Nóema 3:1-30.
    Nel contributo, partendo da una prospettiva teoretica, ci si prefigge di analizzare i rapporti fra la filosofia indiana di Śaṃkara (il massimo filosofo del Vedānta, vissuto nell’VIII sec. d. C.) e il pensiero di Bergson. Da un simile punto di vista diviene infatti possibile una riflessione critica e interpretativa sui testi dei due autori, utile a chiarire alcuni problemi ermeneutici del pensiero śaṃkariano. Reciprocamente, la conoscenza del pensiero di Śaṃkara permette di illuminare e chiarire aspetti problematici della filosofia bergsoniana, in (...)
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  36. HInduism and Environmental Ethics: Law, Literature, and Philosophy.Christopher G. Framarin - 2014 - Routledge.
    ... the Earth, San Francisco, CA: Sierra Club Books. Hill Jr., T. (2006)aFinding Value inNature«, Environmental Values 15(3): 331¥41. ¦¦(1983) aIdeals of Human Excellence and Preserving Natural Environments«, Environmental Ethics 5(3): ...
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  37. Saiva Siddhantham - a Hermeneutic and Psycho Analytic Interpretation.Ramanathan Gandhibabu (ed.) - 2015 - manibarathi.
    The SAIVA SIDDHANTHA sastra texts are not studied in debth and the interpretation varies from author to author on many issues. Besides the contemporary trends like hermeneutical and psycho-analytical interpretation are not done yet in the sastra texts. -/- A scientific study of the philosophy of the saiva doctrines especially the core philosophy is my aim. Traditional way to describe them would be to take up the three core issues of the saivite ontology that are the pathi, pasu and pasam. (...)
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  38. The Bhāgavata Purāṇa: Selected Readings.M. Gupta Ravi & Kenneth Valpey - 2016 - New York: Columbia University Press.
    Formalized by the tenth century, the expansive Bhāgavata Purāṇa resists easy categorization. While the narrative holds together as a coherent literary work, its language and expression compete with the best of Sanskrit poetry. The text's theological message focuses on devotion to Krishna or Vishnu, and its philosophical outlook is grounded in the classical traditions of Vedānta and Sāmkhya. This translation and detailed analysis of the Bhāgavata Purāṇa includes endnotes that explain unfamiliar concepts and essays that elucidate the rich debates found (...)
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  39. Individuality and Personality in Maritain and Classical Hindu Philosophy.Raymond Hain - 2014 - In Peter Koritansky (ed.), Human Nature, Contemplation, and the Political Order: Essays Inspired by Jacques Maritain’s Scholasticism and Politics. The American Maritain Association. pp. 63-73.
    Jacques Maritain claims in the opening pages of Scholasticism and Politics that his distinction between individuality and personality is a universal one, and is found prominently, for example, in classical Hindu philosophy. After explaining Maritain's use of these terms, and their importance in Scholasticism and Politics, I consider the principle Upanishads and The Bhagavad Gita in order to see how true Maritain's claim might be, and what importance this might have for politics.
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  40. インドの哲学体系.Nakamura Hajime - 1994 - Tokyo: shunjusha.
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  41. Moral Agency and the Paradox of Self-Interested Concern for the Future in Vasubandhu’s Abhidharmakośabhāṣya.Oren Hanner - forthcoming - Sophia:1-19.
    It is a common view in modern scholarship on Buddhist ethics, that attachment to the self constitutes a hindrance to ethics, whereas rejecting this type of attachment is a necessary condition for acting morally. The present article argues that in Vasubandhu's theory of agency, as formulated in the Abhidharmakośabhāṣya (Treasury of Metaphysics with Self-Commentary), a cognitive and psychological identification with a conventional, persisting self is a requisite for exercising moral agency. As such, this identification is essential for embracing the ethics (...)
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  42. Buddhism as Reductionism: Personal Identity and Ethics in Parfitian Readings of Buddhist Philosophy; From Steven Collins to the Present.Oren Hanner - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):211-231.
    Derek Parfit’s early work on the metaphysics of persons has had a vast influence on Western philosophical debates about the nature of personal identity and moral theory. Within the study of Buddhism, it also has sparked a continuous comparative discourse, which seeks to explicate Buddhist philosophical principles in light of Parfit’s conceptual framework. Examining important Parfitian-inspired studies of Buddhist philosophy, this article points out various ways in which a Parfitian lens shaped, often implicitly, contemporary understandings of the anātman doctrine and (...)
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  43. Where Does the Cetanic Break Take Place? Weakness of Will in Śāntideva’s Bodhicaryāvatāra.Stephen E. Harris - 2016 - Comparative Philosophy 7 (2).
    This article explores the role of weakness of will in the Indian Buddhist tradition, and in particular within Śāntideva’s Introduction to the Practice of Awakening. In agreement with Jay Garfield, I argue that there are important differences between Aristotle’s account of akrasia and Buddhist moral psychology. Nevertheless, taking a more expanded conception of weakness of will, as is frequently done in contemporary work, allows us to draw significant connections with the pluralistic account of psychological conflict found in Buddhist texts. I (...)
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  44. The Indian Mind: Essentials of Indian Philosophy and Culture, And: The Chinese Mind: Essentials of Chinese Philosophy and Culture, And: The Japanese Mind: Essentials of Japanese Philosophy and Culture.Philomène Harrison - 1970 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (1):115-121.
  45. Vergleich der Antithesen europäischen und indischen Denkens.Betty Heimann - 1926 - Kant-Studien 31 (1-3):549-562.
  46. Zur Struktur des indischen Denkens.Betty Heimann - 1925 - Kant-Studien 30 (1-2):1-22.
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  47. Indian Philosophy? Some Notes and Suggestions for an Approach (Kant).H. Herring - 1998 - Kant-Studien 89 (3):353-362.
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  48. Zur Rezeption deutscher Philosophie im zeitgenössischen indischen Denken.Herbert Herring - 1979 - Kant-Studien 70 (1-4):225-231.
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  49. Ācārya Kundakunda’s Pravacanasāra – Essence of the Doctrine.Vijay K. Jain - 2018 - Dehradun, India: Vikalp Printers.
    Ācārya Kundakunda’s (circa 1st century BCE) Pravacanasāra is among the most popular Jaina Scriptures that are studied with great reverence by the ascetics as well as the laymen. Consciousness manifests in form of cognition (upayoga) – pure-cognition (śuddhopayoga), auspicious-cognition (śubhopayoga) and inauspicious-cognition (aśubhopayoga). Pure-cognition represents conduct without-attachment (vītarāga cāritra). Perfect knowledge or omniscience (kevalajñāna) is the fruit of pure-cognition (śuddhopayoga). The soul engaged in pure-cognition (śuddhopayoga) enjoys supreme happiness engendered by the soul itself; this happiness is beyond the five senses (...)
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  50. Introduction to the Issue: Academic Study of Religion in South Asia.Marzenna Jakubczak - 2016 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 6 (1):5-10.
    A comparative perspective in the study of religion, which goes beyond the Eurocentric interests with their predominating Judeo‑Christian standpoint, has already been taken up in one of our previous issues (Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal, 2014, Vol. 4, No. 1). This time, we focus on the South Asian context only. In particular, we discuss the academic approach to the study of religion in contemporary India and Bangladesh, which may be distinguished from other attitudes such as the theological study of religion or (...)
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