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  1. Sceptical Theism and the Paradox of Evil.Luis R. G. Oliveira - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 98 (2):319-333.
    Given plausible assumptions about the nature of evidence and undercutting defeat, many believe that the force of the evidential problem of evil depends on sceptical theism’s being false: if evil is...
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  2. The Reception of Positivism in Whewell, Mill and Brentano.Arnaud Dewalque - forthcoming - In Ion Tanasescu (ed.), Brentano – Comte – Mill: The Idea of Philosophy and Psychology as Science.
    This article compares and contrasts the reception of Comte’s positivism in the works of William Whewell, John Stuart Mill and Franz Brentano. It is argued that Whewell’s rejection of positivism derives from his endorsement of a constructivist account of the inductive sciences, while Mill and Brentano’s sympathies for positivism are connected to their endorsement of an empiricist account. The mandate of the article is to spell out the chief differences between these two rival accounts. In the last, conclusive section, Whewell’s (...)
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  3. The Future of Human-Artificial Intelligence Nexus and its Environmental Costs.Petr Spelda & Vit Stritecky - forthcoming - Futures.
    The environmental costs and energy constraints have become emerging issues for the future development of Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI). So far, the discussion on environmental impacts of ML/AI lacks a perspective reaching beyond quantitative measurements of the energy-related research costs. Building on the foundations laid down by Schwartz et al., 2019 in the GreenAI initiative, our argument considers two interlinked phenomena, the gratuitous generalisation capability and the future where ML/AI performs the majority of quantifiable inductive inferences. The (...)
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  4. Has Science Established That the Universe is Physically Comprehensible?Nicholas Maxwell - 2013 - In A. Travena & B. Soen (eds.), Recent Advances in Cosmology. New York, USA: Nova Science. pp. 1-56.
    Most scientists would hold that science has not established that the cosmos is physically comprehensible – i.e. such that there is some as-yet undiscovered true physical theory of everything that is unified. This is an empirically untestable, or metaphysical thesis. It thus lies beyond the scope of science. Only when physics has formulated a testable unified theory of everything which has been amply corroborated empirically will science be in a position to declare that it has established that the cosmos is (...)
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  5. A Demonstration of the Incompleteness of Calculi of Inductive Inference.John D. Norton - 2019 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 70 (4):1119-1144.
    A complete calculus of inductive inference captures the totality of facts about inductive support within some domain of propositions as relations or theorems within the calculus. It is demonstrated that there can be no complete, non-trivial calculus of inductive inference. 1Introduction 2The Deductive Structure 2.1Finite Boolean algebras of propositions 2.2Symmetries of the Boolean algebra 3Deductively Definable Logics of Induction: The Formal Expression of Completeness 3.1Strength of inductive support 3.2Explicit definition 3.3Implicit definition 4The Symmetry Theorem 4.1An illustration 4.2The general case 5Asymptotic (...)
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  6. What Do We Mean by “True” in Scientific Realism?Robert W. P. Luk - forthcoming - Foundations of Science:1-12.
    A crucial aspect of scientific realism is what do we mean by true. In Luk’s theory and model of scientific study, a theory can be believed to be “true” but a model is only accurate. Therefore, what do we mean by a “true” theory in scientific realism? Here, we focus on exploring the notion of truth by some thought experiments and we come up with the idea that truth is related to what we mean by the same. This has repercussion (...)
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  7. Non-Inferential Transitions: Imagery and Association.Eric Mandelbaum & Jake Quilty-Dunn - forthcoming - In Timothy Chan & Anders Nes (eds.), Inference and Consciousness. New York, NY, USA:
    Unconscious logical inference seems to rely on the syntactic structures of mental representations (Quilty-Dunn & Mandelbaum 2018). Other transitions, such as transitions using iconic representations and associative transitions, are harder to assimilate to syntax-based theories. Here we tackle these difficulties head on in the interest of a fuller taxonomy of mental transitions. Along the way we discuss how icons can be compositional without having constituent structure, and expand and defend the “symmetry condition” on Associationism (the idea that associative links and (...)
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  8. Public Trust in Science: Exploring the Idiosyncrasy-Free Ideal.Marion Boulicault & S. Andrew Schroeder - manuscript
    What makes science trustworthy to the public? This chapter examines one proposed answer: the trustworthiness of science is based at least in part on its independence from the idiosyncratic values, interests, and ideas of individual scientists. That is, science is trustworthy to the extent that following the scientific process would result in the same conclusions, regardless of the particular scientists involved. We analyze this "idiosyncrasy-free ideal" for science by looking at philosophical debates about inductive risk, focusing on two recent proposals (...)
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  9. Why is Bayesian Confirmation Theory Rarely Practiced?Robert W. P. Luk - 2019 - Science and Philosophy 7 (1):3-20.
    Bayesian confirmation theory is a leading theory to decide the confirmation/refutation of a hypothesis based on probability calculus. While it may be much discussed in philosophy of science, is it actually practiced in terms of hypothesis testing by scientists? Since the assignment of some of the probabilities in the theory is open to debate and the risk of making the wrong decision is unknown, many scientists do not use the theory in hypothesis testing. Instead, they use alternative statistical tests that (...)
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  10. Menachem Fisch. Creatively Undecided: Toward a History and Philosophy of Scientific Agency. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017. Pp. 304. $27.92. [REVIEW]Karim Bschir - 2019 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 9 (1):189-192.
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  11. What is Inductive Risk?: Kevin C. Elliott and Ted Richards : Exploring Inductive Risk: Case Studies of Values in Science. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, 312pp, $39.95 PB. [REVIEW]S. Schroeder - 2019 - Metascience 28 (1):29-32.
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  12. Induction and Epistemological Naturalism.Lars-Göran Johansson - 2018 - Philosophies 3 (4):31-0.
    Epistemological naturalists reject the demand for a priori justification of empirical knowledge; no such thing is possible. Observation reports, being the foundation of empirical knowledge, are neither justified by other sentences, nor certain; but they may be agreed upon as starting points for inductive reasoning and they function as implicit definitions of predicates used. Making inductive generalisations from observations is a basic habit among humans. We do that without justification, but we have strong intuitions that some inductive generalisations will fail, (...)
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  13. Historical Inductions Meet the Material Theory.Elay Shech - forthcoming - Philosophy of Science.
    Historical inductions, viz., the pessimistic meta-induction and the problem of unconceived alternatives, are critically analyzed via John D. Norton’s material theory of induction and subsequently rejected as non-cogent arguments. It is suggested that the material theory is amenable to a local version of the pessimistic meta-induction, e.g., in the context of some medical studies.
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  14. Direct Inference in the Material Theory of Induction.William Peden - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (4):672-695.
    John D. Norton’s “Material Theory of Induction” has been one of the most intriguing recent additions to the philosophy of induction. Norton’s account appears to be a notably natural account of actual inductive practices, although his theory has attracted considerable criticism. I detail several novel issues for his theory but argue that supplementing the Material Theory with a theory of direct inference could address these problems. I argue that if this combination is possible, a stronger theory of inductive reasoning emerges, (...)
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  15. Newton's Regulae Philosophandi.Zvi Biener - 2018 - In Chris Smeenk & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Isaac Newton. Oxford University Press.
    Newton’s Regulae philosophandi—the rules for reasoning in natural philosophy—are maxims of causal reasoning and induction. This essay reviews their significance for Newton’s method of inquiry, as well as their application to particular propositions within the Principia. Two main claims emerge. First, the rules are not only interrelated, they defend various facets of the same core idea: that nature is simple and orderly by divine decree, and that, consequently, human beings can be justified in inferring universal causes from limited phenomena, if (...)
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  16. William Whewell’s Semantic Account of Induction.Corey Dethier - 2018 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 8 (1):141-156.
    William Whewell’s account of induction differs dramatically from the one familiar from twentieth-century debates. I argue that Whewell’s induction can be usefully understood by comparing the difference between his views and more standard accounts to contemporary debates between semantic and syntactic views of theories: rather than understanding inductive inference as capturing a relationship between sentences or propositions, Whewell understands it as a method for constructing a model of the world. The difference between this view and the more familiar picture of (...)
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  17. Local Induction. Radu J. Bogdan.Jonathan E. Adler - 1977 - Philosophy of Science 44 (1):173-177.
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  18. Newton and the Ideal of Exegetical Success.Zvi Biener - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 60:82-87.
    Review Essay of ‘Isaac Newton’s Scientific Method’ by William L. Harper.
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  19. II.—On a Defect in the Customary Logical Formulation of Inductive Reasoning.Bernard Bosanquet - 1910 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 11 (1):29-40.
  20. Corroboration Versus Induction.Joseph Agassi - 1958 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 9 (33):311.
  21. Induction and Non-Instantial Hypothesis.R. Das - 1957 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 8 (29):317.
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  22. Whewell's Philosophy of Induction.Homer H. Dubs - 1931 - Journal of Philosophy 28 (14):385-386.
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  23. Abstraction, Relation, and Induction: Three Essays in the History of Thought.Ernest A. Moody - 1967 - Journal of Philosophy 64 (17):538-541.
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  24. The Problem of Induction and Its Solution.Frederic Schick - 1963 - Journal of Philosophy 60 (16):473-478.
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  25. A Treatise on Induction and Probability.William H. Hay - 1953 - Journal of Philosophy 50 (25):782-788.
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  26. Induction, Probability, and Causation.Howard Smokler - 1970 - Journal of Philosophy 67 (2):45-49.
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  27. Hypotheses and Inductive Predictions: Including Examples on Crash Data.J. -W. Romeyn - 2004 - Synthese 141 (3):333-364.
    This paper studies the use of hypotheses schemes in generating inductive predictions. After discussing Carnap-Hintikka inductive logic, hypotheses schemes are defined and illustrated with two partitions. One partition results in the Carnapian continuum of inductive methods, the other results in predictions typical for hasty generalization. Following these examples I argue that choosing a partition comes down to making inductive assumptions on patterns in the data, and that by choosing appropriately any inductive assumption can be made. Further considerations on partitions make (...)
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  28. Elementary Properties of Inductive Limits.Isidore Fleischer - 1963 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 9 (23):347-350.
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  29. Remarks on the Relevance of Induction to the Physical Sciences.George L. Farre - 1964 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 38:178.
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  30. Discussion: Katz on the Vindication of Induction.F. John Clendinnen - 1965 - Philosophy of Science 32 (3/4):370.
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  31. Induction and the Empiricist Model of Knowledge.Kutschera Franz - unknown
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  32. Eliminative Abduction: Examples From Medicine.Alexander Bird - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (4):345-352.
    Peter Lipton argues that inference to the best explanation involves the selection of a hypothesis on the basis of its loveliness. I argue that in optimal cases of IBE we may be able to eliminate all but one of the hypotheses. In such cases we have a form of eliminative induction takes place, which I call ‘Holmesian inference’. I argue that Lipton’s example in which Ignaz Semmelweis identified a cause of puerperal fever better illustrates Holmesian inference than Liptonian IBE. I (...)
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  33. Whewell’s Tidal Researches: Scientific Practice and Philosophical Methodology.Steffen Ducheyne - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):26-40.
    Primarily between 1833 and 1840, William Whewell attempted to accomplish what natural philosophers and scientists since at least Galileo had failed to do: to provide a systematic and broad-ranged study of the tides and to attempt to establish a general scientific theory of tidal phenomena. I document the close interaction between Whewell’s philosophy of science and his scientific practice as a tidologist. I claim that the intertwinement between Whewell’s methodology and his tidology is more fundamental than has hitherto been documented.Keywords: (...)
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  34. Demonstrative Induction.Henry E. Kyburg - 1960 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21:80.
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  35. Watkins, Eric, Ed. Kant and the Sciences. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Tlumak - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):684-687.
  36. More on Induction in the Language with a Satisfaction Class.Henryk Kotlarski & Zygmunt Ratajczyk - 1990 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 36 (5):441-454.
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  37. Pragmatic Truth and the Logic of Induction.Newton C. A. da Costa & Steven French - 1989 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (3):333-356.
    We apply the recently elaborated notions of 'pragmatic truth' and 'pragmatic probability' to the problem of the construction of a logic of inductive inference. It is argued that the system outlined here is able to overcome many of the objections usually levelled against such attempts. We claim, furthermore, that our view captures the essentially cumulative nature of science and allows us to explain why it is indeed reasonable to accept and believe in the conclusions reached by inductive inference.
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  38. Concepts of Projectibility and the Problems of Induction.John Earman - 1994 - In .
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  39. Inductive Probability.Wesley C. Salmon - 1963 - Philosophical Review 72 (3):392.
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  40. Reason and Prediction.Simon Blackburn - 1973 - London: Cambridge University Press.
    An original study of the philosophical problems associated with inductive reasoning. Like most of the main questions in epistemology, the classical problem of induction arises from doubts about a mode of inference used to justify some of our most familiar and pervasive beliefs. The experience of each individual is limited and fragmentary, yet the scope of our beliefs is much wider; and it is the relation between belief and experience, in particular the belief that the future will in some respects (...)
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  41. Inductive Learning in Small and Large Worlds.Simon M. Huttegger - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 95 (1):90-116.
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  42. Projectibility.Israel Scheffler - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (6):334-336.
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  43. A Note on Goodman’s Problem.Robert Schwartz - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy 102 (7):375-379.
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  44. Penny Pinching and Backward Induction.Martin Hollis - 1991 - Journal of Philosophy 88 (9):473.
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  45. The Principle of Induction.Asher Moore - 1952 - Journal of Philosophy 49 (24):741.
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  46. Measurement of the Thermoelectric Power of Ice by an Induction Method.J. L. Brownscombe† & B. J. Mason† - 1966 - Philosophical Magazine 14 (131):1037-1047.
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  47. IV.—Induction and Probability.G. T. Kneebone - 1950 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 50 (1):27-42.
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  48. Theory-Based Causal Induction.Thomas L. Griffiths & Joshua B. Tenenbaum - 2009 - Psychological Review 116 (4):661-716.
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  49. Conduct and the Weather--An Inductive Study of the Mental Effects of Definite Meterological Conditions.Edwin Grant Dexter - 1899 - Psychological Review 6 (5):539-540.
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  50. Demon Possession and Allied Themes, Being an Inductive Study of Phenomena of Our Own Times.No Authorship Indicated - 1895 - Psychological Review 2 (5):529-531.
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