Infanticide

Edited by Craig Paterson (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
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  1. Cultural Explanations and Clinical Ethics: Active Euthanasia in Neonatology.A. Ahmad - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):192-192.
    The authors have undertaken a study to explore the views in non-Western cultures about ending the lives of newborns with genetic defects. This study consists of including active euthanasia alongside withdrawal and withholding of treatment as potential methods used.Apart from radicalising the support for active euthanasia in certain instances of neonatal diagnoses, is another interesting point that views of children and death are shaped by religion and culture and are especially highly charged with culturally specific symbolism/s. Furthermore, this is augmented (...)
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  2. The Effect of Divorce on Infant Mortality in a Remote Area of Bangladesh.Nurul Alam, Sajal K. Saha, Abdur Razzaque & Jeroen K. van GinneKen - 2001 - Journal of Biosocial Science 33 (2):271-278.
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  3. Infant Mortality and Longevity.Chester Alexander - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  4. Infant and Child Mortality in Bangladesh.Ruhul Amin - 1988 - Journal of Biosocial Science 20 (1):59.
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  5. A Committee Consults: The Care of an Anencephalic Infant.Sheldon T. Berkowitz - 1986 - Hastings Center Report 16 (3):18-19.
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  6. The Moral Significance of Birth.Jose Luis Bermudez - 1996 - Ethics 106 (2):378 - 403.
    The author challenges the view that birth cannot be a morally relevant fact in the process of development from zygote to child. He reviews specific arguments against giving any moral significance to the fact of birth. Drawing on recent work in developmental psychology, he contends that the lives of neonates can have a level of self-consciousness that confers moral significance but can only be possessed after birth. He shows that the position he has argued for provides a framework within which (...)
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  7. Do Infant Rats Cry?Mark S. Blumberg & Greta Sokoloff - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (1):83-95.
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  8. Philosophers On Abortion And Infanticide.Frank Bouchier-Hayes - 1998 - Minerva 2.
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  9. Measurements, Morality, and the Politics of €œNormal” Infant Growth.Leslie Butt - 1999 - Journal of Medical Humanities 20 (2):81-100.
    Although the birth and early life of an infant is similar throughout the world, meanings ascribed to infants differ according to cultural values and beliefs. This essay describes how scholars and healers have come to see the infant as distinct from other types of people, and what implications this distinction carries for how health care is practiced. The first portion of this essay explores how understanding of the infant, particularly the well-accepted notion of normal infant growth and development, came to (...)
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  10. Is the Pro-Choice Position for Infanticide 'Madness'?Charles Camosy - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):301-302.
    Professor George and I agree more than we disagree, but I continue to question his use of ‘madness’ to describe support of infanticide. Many will think he means no reasonable person can support infanticide—especially when he compares it with support of slavery and he claims that ‘anyone’ should ‘immediately’ be able to see that infanticide is wrong.George admits that Jefferson Davis’ support of slavery was not the same as support of slavery today because Davis’ social order was built around principles (...)
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  11. Infanticide and the Value of Life.A. G. M. Campbell - 1979 - Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (3):150-150.
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  12. Infanticide and the Liberal View on Abortion.Robert F. Card - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (4):340–351.
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  13. Infanticide and the Right to Life.Alan Carter - 1997 - Ratio 10 (1):1–9.
    Michael Tooley defends infanticide by analysing ‘A has a right to X’ as roughly synonymous with ‘If A desires X, then others are under a prima facie obligation to refrain from actions that would deprive him [or her] of it.’ An infant who cannot conceive of himself or herself as a continuing subject of experiences cannot desire to continue existing. Hence, on Tooley’s analysis, killing the infant is not impermissible, for it does not go against any of the infant’s desires. (...)
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  14. Infant Suffering Revisited.Andrew Chignell - 2001 - Religious Studies 37 (4):475-484.
    I respond to two sets of objections to my characterization of infant suffering and the problem that it presents to traditional theism. My main theses were that infant suffering to death is not ‘horrendous’ in the technical sense defined, but that a good God still needs to "balance off" rather than "defeat" such suffering. David Basinger, on the other hand, claims that some infant suffering should be considered horrendous, while Nathan Nobis suggests that such suffering must be defeated rather than (...)
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  15. The Problem of Infant Suffering.Andrew Chignell - 1998 - Religious Studies 34 (2):205-217.
    The problem of infant suffering and death is often regarded as one of the more difficult versions of the problem of evil (see Ivan Karamazov), especially when one considers how God can be thought good to infant victims by the infant victims. In the first section of this paper, I examine two recent theodicies that aim to solve this problem but (I argue) fail. In the second section, I suggest that the only viable approach to the problem rejects the idea (...)
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  16. You Should Not Have Let Your Baby Die.Gary Comstock - 2017 July 12 - New York Times.
    Sam, your newborn son, has been suffocating in your arms for the past 15 minutes. You’re as certain as you can be that he is going to die in the next 15.
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  17. Infanticide for the Handicapped Newborn--A Secular Rejection.A. Davis - 1988 - Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (4):223-223.
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  18. Abortion and Infanticide.Nancy Davis & Michael Tooley - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (3):436.
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  19. Abortion, Contraception, Infanticide.E. Devine Philip - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (226):513 - 520.
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  20. TOOLEY, MICHAEL Abortion and Infanticide. [REVIEW]Philip E. Devine - 1984 - Philosophy 59:545.
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  21. Abortion and Infanticide By Michael Tooley Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983, 441 Pp., £20.00. [REVIEW]Philip E. Devine - 1984 - Philosophy 59 (230):545-.
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  22. Lick Rates in Infant Mongolian Gerbils.Robert T. Dickinson & Robert W. Schaeffer - 1975 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (5):509-510.
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  23. Killing Babies: Hrdy on the Evolution of Infanticide. [REVIEW]Catherine Driscoll - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):271-289.
    Sarah Hrdy argues that women (1) possess a reproductive behavioral strategy including infanticide, (2) that this strategy is an adaptation and (3) arose as a response to stresses mothers faced with the agrarian revolution. I argue that while psychopathological and cultural evolutionary accounts for Hrdy's data fail, her suggested psychological architecture for the strategy suggests that the behavior she describes is really only the consequence of the operation of practical reasoning mechanism(s) – and consequently there is no reproductive strategy including (...)
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  24. Michael Tooley, Abortion and Infanticide.Richard Edwards - 1986 - Radical Philosophy 44:44.
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  25. Reinventing the Asexual Infant: On the Recent "Explosion" in Infant Research.Arthur Efron - 1985 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 6 (2).
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  26. Infanticide, Moral Status and Moral Reasons: The Importance of Context.Leslie Francis & Anita Silvers - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):289-292.
    Giubilini and Minerva ask why birth should be a critical dividing line between acceptable and unacceptable reasons for terminating existence. Their argument is that birth does not change moral status in the sense that is relevant: the ability to be harmed by interruption of one's aims. Rather than question the plausibility of their position or the argument they give, we ask instead about the importance to scholarship or policy of publishing the article: does it to any extent make a novel (...)
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  27. Infant Mortality in Sri Lanka.Indra Gajanayake - 1988 - Journal of Biosocial Science 20 (1):79.
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  28. Scholarly Discussion of Infanticide?MirkO D. Garasic - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (4):inside back cover-inside back co.
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  29. Infanticide and Madness.Robert P. George - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):299-301.
    I am, of course, aware that infanticide was accepted and practiced in ancient Greece and Rome, and is still practiced in places like India and China today; just as I am aware that slavery was accepted and practiced in ancient Greece and Rome , and is still practiced in some places today. But if philosophers, no matter how sophisticated, were to step forward today to argue that slavery is morally acceptable , I would call that madness.Of course, the ‘madness’ I (...)
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  30. Response To: Is the Pro-Choice Position for Infanticide 'Madness'?Robert P. George - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):302-302.
    As Charles Camosy observes, he and I agree more than we disagree. He believes with no less conviction than I do that deliberately killing infant children is profoundly morally wrong and a grave violation of human rights.1 So where do we disagree?I think that killing infant children, or promoting the moral permissibility of doing so, is moral madness, and that we should say so, rather than treating infanticide as just one more legitimate, albeit in the end morally mistaken view. We (...)
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  31. Infant Arithmetic: Wynn's Hypothesis Should Not Be Dismissed.Marcus Giaquinto - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (4):364-366.
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  32. Twin Infanticide‐A Cross‐Cultural Test of a Materialistic Explanation.Gary Granzberg - 1973 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 1 (4):405-412.
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  33. Abortion and Neonaticide: Ethics, Practice and Policy in Four Nations.Michael L. Gross - 2002 - Bioethics 16 (3):202–230.
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  34. Infanticide in History.Gershon B. Grunfeld - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (5):48-48.
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  35. Infanticide and Society.Gershon Benyamin Grunfeld - 1989 - Dissertation, The University of Tennessee
    As the framework to this study I accept that rights are meaningful only within the context of a social system, and belong to individuals only in virtue of their role within the system. The implications of this theory are examined in the study. ;The study opens with a historical review of infanticide in Western civilization, it continues with a socio-biological perspective of infanticide. Both points of view stress the fact that infanticide crosses both social, geographical and historical borders. ;A theory (...)
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  36. Abortion and Infanticide.J. Harris - 1985 - Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (4):212-212.
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  37. Michael Tooley and the Jolly Nasty Conclusion.John Harris - 1986 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (2):255-259.
    Some recent powerful and persuasive arguments seem to imply that a world of people with lives that are barely worth living is preferable to a world which contains fewer people all of whom have extremely satisfying lives. This ‘repugnant conclusion’ is clearly to be rejected if possible—but is it possible? Many attempts to reject or avoid it have failed. One of the latest, by Michael Tooley, looked promising but the present essay argues that this attempt has also failed.
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  38. Consciousness and the Moral Permissibility of Infanticide.Nicole Hassoun & Uriah Kriegel - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):45–55.
    In this paper, we present a conditional argument for the moral permissibility of some kinds of infanticide. The argument is based on a certain view of consciousness and the claim that there is an intimate connection between consciousness and infanticide. In bare outline, the argument is this: it is impermissible to intentionally kill a creature only if the creature is conscious; it is reasonable to believe that there is some time at which human infants are conscious; therefore, it is reasonable (...)
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  39. Estimating Infant Mortality Rates Prospectively in Honduras.David Hubacher, Patricia Bailey, Barbara Janowitz, Fidel Barahona & Marco Pinel - 1992 - Journal of Biosocial Science 24 (4):433-445.
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  40. Do Male cheetahsAcinonyx Jubatuscommit Infanticide?L. T. B. Hunter & J. D. Skinner - 2003 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 58 (1):79-82.
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  41. Karmic Criticism of Abortion and Infanticide.Noriaki Iwasa - unknown
    Employing both hedonistic and preference utilitarianism, Peter Singer argues for abortion and infanticide. This essay challenges his arguments from the perspective of karma. There is suggestive evidence for karma. Singer's claim that fetuses and newborn infants are not persons is false if they have souls. Abortion and infanticide, if performed on human embryos with souls, fetuses with souls, and infants with souls, temporarily deprive them and possibly potential mothers of their opportunities to decrease their negative karma and increase their positive (...)
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  42. Prior and Proximate Causes of Infant Survival in Ghana, with Special Attention to Polygyny. A Comment.William H. James - 1998 - Journal of Biosocial Science 30 (1):127-133.
    Amankwaa (1996) gives data on infant mortality in monogamous and polygynous families. However he does not categorise his data by sex. This is important because one might expect infant mortality to vary by sex; moreover the offspring sex ratios of polygynous and monogamous women reportedly differ.
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  43. Against Infanticide.E. W. Keyserlingk - 1986 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 14 (3-4):154-157.
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  44. Against Infanticide.E. W. Keyserlingk - 1986 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (3-4):154-157.
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  45. Infanticide and the Vulnerable Newborn: The Dutch Debate.G. K. Kimsma - 1993 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (3):259.
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  46. Michael Tooley, Abortion and Infanticide. [REVIEW]Eike-Henner Kluge - 1985 - Philosophy in Review 5:363-368.
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  47. Michael Tooley, Abortion and Infanticide Reviewed By.Eike-Henner W. Kluge - 1985 - Philosophy in Review 5 (8):363-368.
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  48. Neonatal Euthanasia is Unsupportable: The Groningen Protocol Should Be Abandoned.Alexander A. Kon - 2007 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (5):453-463.
    The growing support for voluntary active euthanasia is evident in the recently approved Dutch Law on Termination of Life on Request. Indeed, the debate over legalized VAE has increased in European countries, the United States, and many other nations over the last several years. The proponents of VAE argue that when a patient judges that the burdens of living outweigh the benefits, euthanasia can be justified. If some adults suffer to such an extent that VAE is justified, then one may (...)
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  49. Michael Tooley on Possible People and Promising.Helga Kuhse - 1993 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (3):353.
    In Abortion and Infanticide, Michael Tooley argues that it is not wrong to destroy potential persons, such as fetuses and newly born infants. His argument presupposes the following: 1)that the destruction of potential persons is not directly wrong because potential persons do not have a right to life; 2)that destroying a potential person—a fetus or an infant—is morally the same as preventing the existence of an possible person by, for example, using a contraceptive or refraining from, intercourse during a woman's (...)
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  50. Quality of Life and the Death of "Baby M". A Report From Australia.Helga Kuhse - 1992 - Bioethics 6 (3):233–250.
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