Infanticide

Edited by Craig Paterson (Complutense University of Madrid)
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129 found
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  1. Abortion and Infanticide: A Radical Libertarian Defence.J. C. Lester - manuscript
    There is an outline of the libertarian approach this takes. On the assumption of personhood, it is explained how there need be no overall inflicted harm and no proactive killing with abortion and infanticide. This starts with an attached-adult analogy and transitions to dealing directly with the issues. Various well-known criticisms are answered throughout. There is then a more-abstract explanation of how it is paradoxical to assume a duty to do more than avoid inflicting overall harm and, instead, positively benefit. (...)
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  2. Infant Mortality and Longevity.Chester Alexander - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  3. Defending the Distinction Between Pregnancy and Parenthood.Prabhpal Singh - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (3):189-191.
    In this paper, I respond to criticisms toward my account of the difference in moral status between fetuses and newborns. I show my critics have not adequately argued for their view that pregnant women participate in a parent-child relationship. While an important counterexample is raised against my account, this counterexample had already been dealt with in my original paper. Because the criticisms against my account lack argumentative support, they do not pose a problem for my account. I conclude the raised (...)
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  4. Parental Responsibilities and Moral Status.Bruce Philip Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (3):187-188.
    Prabhpal Singh has recently defended a relational account of the difference in moral status between fetuses and newborns as a way of explaining why abortion is permissible and infanticide is not. He claims that only a newborn can stand in a parent–child relation, not a fetus, and this relation has a moral dimension that bestows moral value. We challenge Singh’s reasoning, arguing that the case he presents is unconvincing. We suggest that the parent–child relation is better understood as an extension (...)
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  5. Being Human: Why and in What Sense It is Morally Relevant.Roland Kipke - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (2):148-158.
    The debate on the question of the moral status of human beings and the boundaries of the moral community has long been dominated by the antagonism between personism and speciesism: either certain mental properties or membership of the human species is considered morally crucial. In this article, I argue that both schools of thought are equally implausible in major respects, and that these shortcomings arise from the same reason in both cases: a biological notion of being human. By contrast, I (...)
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  6. Fetuses, Newborns, and Parental Responsibility.Prabhpal Singh - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (3):188-193.
    I defend a relational account of difference in the moral status between fetuses and newborns. The difference in moral status between a fetus and a newborn is that the newborn baby is the proper object of ‘parental responsibility’ whereas the fetus is not. ‘Parental responsibilities’ are a moral dimension of a ‘parent-child relation’, a relation which newborn babies stand in, but fetuses do not. I defend this relational account by analyzing the concepts of ‘parent’ and ‘child’, and conclude that the (...)
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  7. Reasonable Parental and Medical Obligations in Pediatric Extraordinary Therapy.Michal Pruski & Nathan K. Gamble - 2019 - The Linacre Quarterly 86 (2-3):198-206.
    The English cases of Charlie Gard and Alfie Evans involved a conflict between the desires of their parents to preserve their children’s lives and judgments of their medical teams in pursuit of clinically appropriate therapy. The treatment the children required was clearly extraordinary, including a wide array of advanced life-sustaining technological support. The cases exemplify a clash of worldviews rooted in different philosophies of life and medical care. The article highlights the differing perspectives on parental authority in medical care in (...)
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  8. The Meaning of Killing. [REVIEW]Nicolas Delon - 2018 - Books and Ideas 2018.
    Why do we consider killing and letting someone die to be two different things? Why do we believe that a doctor who refuses to treat a terminally ill patient is doing anything less than administering a lethal substance? After all, the consequences are the same, and perhaps the moral status of these acts should be judged accordingly. -/- Reviewed: Jonathan Glover, Questions de vie ou de mort (Causing Death and Saving Lives), translated into French and introduced by Benoît Basse, Genève, (...)
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  9. Beyond Infanticide: How Psychological Accounts of Persons Can Justify Harming Infants.Daniel Rodger, Bruce P. Blackshaw & Calum Miller - 2018 - The New Bioethics 24 (2):106-121.
    It is commonly argued that a serious right to life is grounded only in actual, relatively advanced psychological capacities a being has acquired. The moral permissibility of abortion is frequently argued for on these grounds. Increasingly it is being argued that such accounts also entail the permissibility of infanticide, with several proponents of these theories accepting this consequence. We show, however, that these accounts imply the permissibility of even more unpalatable acts than infanticide performed on infants: organ harvesting, live experimentation, (...)
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  10. You Should Not Have Let Your Baby Die.Gary Comstock - 2017 July 12 - New York Times.
    Sam, your newborn son, has been suffocating in your arms for the past 15 minutes. You’re as certain as you can be that he is going to die in the next 15.
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  11. Dutch Protocols for Deliberately Ending the Life of Newborns: A Defence.Matthew Tedesco - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):251-259.
    The Groningen Protocol, introduced in the Netherlands in 2005 and accompanied by revised guidelines published in a report commissioned by the Royal Dutch Medical Association in 2014, specifies conditions under which the lives of severely ill newborns may be deliberately ended. Its publication came four years after the Netherlands became the first nation to legalize the voluntary active euthanasia of adults, and the Netherlands remains the only country to offer a pathway to protecting physicians who might engage in deliberately ending (...)
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  12. Pro‐Life Arguments Against Infanticide and Why They Are Not Convincing.Joona Räsänen - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (9):656-662.
    Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva's controversial article ‘After-Birth Abortion: Why Should the Baby Live?’ has received a lot of criticism since its publishing. Part of the recent criticism has been made by pro-life philosopher Christopher Kaczor, who argues against infanticide in his updated book ‘Ethics of Abortion’. Kaczor makes four arguments to show where Giubilini and Minerva's argument for permitting infanticide goes wrong. In this article I argue that Kaczor's arguments, and some similar arguments presented by other philosophers, are mistaken (...)
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  13. Valuing Life as Necessary for Moral Status: A Noteon Depression and Personhood.Joshua Stein - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (1):45-51.
    Many contemporary accounts of moral status consider an individual's status to be grounded in some cognitive capacity, e.g. the capacity to experience certain states, to reason morally, etc. One proposed cognitive capacity significant particularly to killing, i.e. having a status that precludes being killed absent cause, is the capacity to value one's own life. I argue that considering this a condition for moral status is a mistake, as it would lead to the exclusion of some individuals with mental health problems (...)
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  14. Od eutanazie k infanticidě.Tomas Hribek - 2015 - Časopis Zdravotnického Práva a Bioetiky 5 (1):5-27.
    [From Euthanasia to Infanticide] The paper revisits the recent controversy over Dr. Mitlőhner’s defense of infanticide, published in this journal. In section 1, I point out the weaknesses of Mitlőhner’s paper. In sections 2 and 3 I turn to the most sophisticated defense of infanticide on offer today, that of Peter Singer’s. Section 2 sums up Singer’s description of the medical practice as already having abandoned the traditional ethic of equal value of all human lives, which motivates ethical revisionism. However, (...)
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  15. Cultural Explanations and Clinical Ethics: Active Euthanasia in Neonatology.Ayesha Ahmad - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):192-192.
    The authors have undertaken a study to explore the views in non-Western cultures about ending the lives of newborns with genetic defects. This study consists of including active euthanasia alongside withdrawal and withholding of treatment as potential methods used.Apart from radicalising the support for active euthanasia in certain instances of neonatal diagnoses, is another interesting point that views of children and death are shaped by religion and culture and are especially highly charged with culturally specific symbolism/s. Furthermore, this is augmented (...)
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  16. Is the Pro-Choice Position for Infanticide 'Madness'?Charles Camosy - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):301-302.
    Professor George and I agree more than we disagree, but I continue to question his use of ‘madness’ to describe support of infanticide. Many will think he means no reasonable person can support infanticide—especially when he compares it with support of slavery and he claims that ‘anyone’ should ‘immediately’ be able to see that infanticide is wrong.George admits that Jefferson Davis’ support of slavery was not the same as support of slavery today because Davis’ social order was built around principles (...)
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  17. Infanticide, Moral Status and Moral Reasons: The Importance of Context.Leslie Francis & Anita Silvers - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):289-292.
    Giubilini and Minerva ask why birth should be a critical dividing line between acceptable and unacceptable reasons for terminating existence. Their argument is that birth does not change moral status in the sense that is relevant: the ability to be harmed by interruption of one's aims. Rather than question the plausibility of their position or the argument they give, we ask instead about the importance to scholarship or policy of publishing the article: does it to any extent make a novel (...)
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  18. Infanticide and Madness.Robert P. George - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):299-301.
    I am, of course, aware that infanticide was accepted and practiced in ancient Greece and Rome, and is still practiced in places like India and China today; just as I am aware that slavery was accepted and practiced in ancient Greece and Rome , and is still practiced in some places today. But if philosophers, no matter how sophisticated, were to step forward today to argue that slavery is morally acceptable , I would call that madness.Of course, the ‘madness’ I (...)
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  19. Response To: Is the Pro-Choice Position for Infanticide 'Madness'?Robert P. George - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):302-302.
    As Charles Camosy observes, he and I agree more than we disagree. He believes with no less conviction than I do that deliberately killing infant children is profoundly morally wrong and a grave violation of human rights.1 So where do we disagree?I think that killing infant children, or promoting the moral permissibility of doing so, is moral madness, and that we should say so, rather than treating infanticide as just one more legitimate, albeit in the end morally mistaken view. We (...)
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  20. Infanticide: A Reply to Giubilini and Minerva.Jacqueline A. Laing - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):336-340.
    The Groningen Protocol and contemporary defences of the legalisation of infanticide are predicated on actualism and personism. According to these related ideas, human beings achieve their moral status in virtue of the degree to which they are capable of laying value upon their lives or exhibiting certain qualities, like not being in pain or being desirable to third party family members. This article challenges these notions suggesting that both ideas depend on arbitrary and discriminatory notions of human moral status. Our (...)
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  21. Aristotle on Abortion and Infanticide.Mathew Lu - 2013 - International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (1):47-62.
    Some recent commentators have thought that, if updated with the findings of modern embryology, Aristotle’s views on abortion would yield a pro-life conclusion. On the basis of a careful reading of the relevant passage from Politics VII, I argue that the matter is more complicated than simply replacing his defective empirical embryological claims with our more accurate ones. Since Aristotle’s view on abortion was shaped not only by a defective embryology but also by an acceptance of the classical Greek practice (...)
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  22. Abortion, Infanticide and Moral Context.Lindsey Porter - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):350-352.
    In ‘After-birth abortion: why should the baby live?’, Giubilini and Minerva argue that infanticide should be permitted for the same reasons as abortion. In particular, they argue that infanticide should be permitted even for reasons that do not primarily serve the interests (or would-be best interests) of the newborn. They claim that abortion is permissible for reasons that do not primarily serve the interests (or would-be interests) of the fetus because fetuses lack a right to life. They argue that newborns (...)
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  23. Abortion, Infanticide and Allowing Babies to Die, 40 Years On.Julian Savulescu - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):257-259.
    In January 2012, the Journal of Medical Ethics published online Giubilini and Minerva's paper, ‘After-birth abortion. Why should the baby live?’.1 The Journal publishes articles based on the quality of their argument, their contribution to the existing literature, and relevance to current medicine. This article met those criteria. It created unprecedented global outrage for a paper published in an academic medical ethics journal. In this special issue of the Journal, Giubilini and Minerva's paper comes to print along with 31 articles (...)
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  24. Discussing Infanticide.Peter Singer - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):260-260.
    Jeremy Bentham, protesting against the cruelty of inflicting the death penalty on mothers who kill their newborn infants, described infanticide as the killing of a being ‘who has ceased to be, before knowing what existence is.’ He also pointed out that is an offence ‘of a nature not to give the slightest inquietude to the most timid imagination,’ for all those who come to learn of the offence are themselves too old to be threatened by it.1 These points still hold (...)
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  25. Scholarly Discussion of Infanticide?MirkO D. Garasic - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (4):inside back cover-inside back co.
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  26. The 'Strange' Case of the Infanticide Doctrine.Arlie Loughnan - 2012 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 32 (4):685-711.
    This article examines the doctrine of infanticide in relation to the norms and practices of criminal responsibility. It adopts an historicized approach to the law, which reveals that the legal proscription of child killing by mothers began as an instance of the principles of criminal liability that have been labelled ‘manifest criminality’. With changes in the social meanings accorded to women who kill their children in the 18th and 19th centuries, however, the law of infanticide developed into an instance of (...)
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  27. Standards, Norms, and Guidelines for Permissible Withdrawal of Life Support From Seriously Compromised Newborns.John J. Paris - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):33 - 34.
    (2011). Standards, Norms, and Guidelines for Permissible Withdrawal of Life Support From Seriously Compromised Newborns. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 33-34.
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  28. Infant Homicide and Accidental Death in the United States, 1940-2005: Ethics and Epidemiological Classification.J. E. Riggs & G. R. Hobbs - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (7):445-448.
    Potential ethical issues can arise during the process of epidemiological classification. For example, unnatural infant deaths are classified as accidental deaths or homicides. Societal sensitivity to the physical abuse and neglect of children has increased over recent decades. This enhanced sensitivity could impact reported infant homicide rates. Infant homicide and accident mortality rates in boys and girls in the USA from 1940 to 2005 were analysed. In 1940, infant accident mortality rates were over 20 times greater than infant homicide rates (...)
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  29. Tooley on Abortion and Infanticide.Ben Saunders - 2011 - In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  30. A Life Worth Giving? The Threshold for Permissible Withdrawal of Life Support From Disabled Newborn Infants.Dominic James Wilkinson - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):20 - 32.
    When is it permissible to allow a newborn infant to die on the basis of their future quality of life? The prevailing official view is that treatment may be withdrawn only if the burdens in an infant's future life outweigh the benefits. In this paper I outline and defend an alternative view. On the Threshold View, treatment may be withdrawn from infants if their future well-being is below a threshold that is close to, but above the zero-point of well-being. I (...)
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  31. Amanda Rees, The Infanticide Controversy: Primatology and the Art of Field Science. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009. Pp. Ix+288. ISBN 978-0-226-70711-2. £40.00. [REVIEW]Georgina Montgomery - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Science 43 (3):502-503.
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  32. Should the Baby Live? Abortion and Infanticide: When Ontology Overlaps Ethics and Peter Singer Echoes the Stoics.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2010 - In Ancient Culture, European and Serbian Heritage. pp. 396-407.
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  33. Consciousness and the Moral Permissibility of Infanticide 1.Nicole Hassoun - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):45-55.
    In this paper, we present a conditional argument for the moral permissibility of some kinds of infanticide. The argument is based on a certain view of consciousness and the claim that there is an intimate connection between consciousness and infanticide. In bare outline, the argument is this: it is impermissible to intentionally kill a creature only if the creature is conscious; it is reasonable to believe that there is some time at which human infants are conscious; therefore, it is reasonable (...)
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  34. Reply to Tooley's Opening Statement.Alvin Plantinga - 2008 - In Knowledge of God. Blackwell.
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  35. Infant-Toddler Centers and Preschools as Places of Culture.Carla Rinaldi - 2008 - In Alexandra Miletta & Maureen McCann Miletta (eds.), Classroom Conversations: A Collection of Classics for Parents and Teachers. The New Press.
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  36. A Precautionary Tale: Separating the Infant From the Fetus.Lawrence Torcello - 2008 - Res Publica 15 (1):17-31.
    This article confronts growing conservative opposition to abortion based on the claim that abortion is morally equivalent to infanticide. By examining the relationship between moral skepticism and precautionary ethics the article promotes a completely permissive position on abortion from conception to birth while consistently rejecting the possibility that such a position entails permissive implications for infanticide. The article introduces and traces the implicit relationship between moral skepticism, the precautionary principle and political liberalism.
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  37. Neonatal Euthanasia is Unsupportable: The Groningen Protocol Should Be Abandoned.Alexander A. Kon - 2007 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (5):453-463.
    The growing support for voluntary active euthanasia is evident in the recently approved Dutch Law on Termination of Life on Request. Indeed, the debate over legalized VAE has increased in European countries, the United States, and many other nations over the last several years. The proponents of VAE argue that when a patient judges that the burdens of living outweigh the benefits, euthanasia can be justified. If some adults suffer to such an extent that VAE is justified, then one may (...)
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  38. Time-Relative Interests and Abortion.S. Liao - 2007 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (2):242-256.
    The concept of a time-relative interest is introduced by Jeff McMahan to solve certain puzzles about the badness of death. Some people (e.g. McMahan and David DeGrazia) believe that this concept can also be used to show that abortion is permissible. In this paper, I first argue that if the Time-Relative Interest Account permits abortion, then it would also permit infanticide.
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  39. Infanticide.Jeff Mcmahan - 2007 - Utilitas 19 (2):131-159.
    It is sometimes suggested that if a moral theory implies that infanticide can sometimes be permissible, that is sufficient to discredit the theory. I argue in this article that the common-sense belief that infanticide is wrong, and perhaps even worse than the killing of an adult, is challenged not so much by theoretical considerations as by common-sense beliefs about abortion, the killing of non-human animals, and so on. Because there are no intrinsic differences between premature infants and viable fetuses, it (...)
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  40. The Ethics of Birth and Death: Gender Infanticide in India. [REVIEW]Renuka M. Sharma - 2007 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (3):181-192.
    This paper discusses the persistent devaluation of the girl child in India and the link between the entrenched perception of female valuelessness and the actual practice of infanticide of girl babies or foetuses. It seeks to place female infanticide, or ‘gendercide,’ within the context of Western-derived conceptions of ethics, justice and rights. To date, current ethical theories and internationally purveyed moral frameworks, as well as legal and political declarations, have fallen short of an adequate moral appraisal of infanticide. This paper (...)
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  41. Killing Babies: Hrdy on the Evolution of Infanticide. [REVIEW]Catherine Driscoll - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):271-289.
    Sarah Hrdy argues that women (1) possess a reproductive behavioral strategy including infanticide, (2) that this strategy is an adaptation and (3) arose as a response to stresses mothers faced with the agrarian revolution. I argue that while psychopathological and cultural evolutionary accounts for Hrdy's data fail, her suggested psychological architecture for the strategy suggests that the behavior she describes is really only the consequence of the operation of practical reasoning mechanism(s) – and consequently there is no reproductive strategy including (...)
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  42. Did the Jews Practice Infant Exposure and Infanticide in Antiquity?Daniel Schwartz - 2004 - The Studia Philonica Annual 16:61-95.
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  43. The Effect of Infant Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Facial Features on Adoption Preference.Katherine L. Waller, Anthony Volk & Vernon L. Quinsey - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (1):101-117.
    Infant facial characteristics may affect discriminative parental solicitude because they convey information about the health of the offspring. We examined the effect of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) infant facial characteristics on hypothetical adoption preferences, ratings of attractiveness, and ratings of health. As expected, potential parents were more likely to adopt “normal” infants, and they rated the FAS infants as less attractive and less healthy. Cuteness/attractiveness was the best predictor of adoption likelihood.
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  44. Do Male cheetahsAcinonyx Jubatuscommit Infanticide?L. T. B. Hunter & J. D. Skinner - 2003 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 58 (1):79-82.
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  45. Abortion and Neonaticide: Ethics, Practice and Policy in Four Nations.Michael L. Gross - 2002 - Bioethics 16 (3):202–230.
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  46. The Influence of Infant Facial Cues on Adoption Preferences.Anthony Volk & Vernon L. Quinsey - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (4):437-455.
    Trivers’s theory of parental investment suggests that adults should decide whether or not to invest in a given infant using a cost-benefit analysis. To make the best investment decision, adults should seek as much relevant information as possible. Infant facial cues may serve to provide information and evoke feelings of parental care in adults. Four specific infant facial cues were investigated: resemblance (as a proxy for kinship), health, happiness, and cuteness. It was predicted that these cues would influence feelings of (...)
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  47. The Effect of Divorce on Infant Mortality in a Remote Area of Bangladesh.Nurul Alam, Sajal K. Saha, Abdur Razzaque & Jeroen K. van Ginneken - 2001 - Journal of Biosocial Science 33 (2):271-278.
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  48. Do Infant Rats Cry?Mark S. Blumberg & Greta Sokoloff - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (1):83-95.
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  49. Infant Suffering Revisited.Andrew Chignell - 2001 - Religious Studies 37 (4):475-484.
    I respond to two sets of objections to my characterization of infant suffering and the problem that it presents to traditional theism. My main theses were that infant suffering to death is not ‘horrendous’ in the technical sense defined, but that a good God still needs to "balance off" rather than "defeat" such suffering. David Basinger, on the other hand, claims that some infant suffering should be considered horrendous, while Nathan Nobis suggests that such suffering must be defeated rather than (...)
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  50. Is the Self of the Infant Preserved in the Adult?Eva Mark - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):347-353.
    What does a confrontation between philosophy and psychoanalysis look like? My task is a philosophical investigation of a psychoanalytic concept. Thus, I offer a conceptual analysis of a concept that is used both clinically and as a part of a metapsychology. The concept that I investigate in this article is regression. I work with the following two problems: What does a conceptual analysis of the phenomenon called regression look like? Regression can be regarded as an instrument that can give us (...)
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