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Summary Inferential theories of concepts hold that they are individuated by reference to their relationships with other concepts. These may be causal, functional, computational, inferential, or associative. So a concept such as PLUS is individuated by the fact that it plays the appropriate role in inferences concerning addition, and a concept such as WATER is individuated by its reference to concepts such as CLEAR, DRINKABLE, and LIQUID. Localistic inferential theories hold that only a small number of these inferences are needed to individuate a concept; holistic inferential theories hold that a concept is individuated by many or all of the inferences that it can participate in.
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  1. Pensamientos de primer orden.Mariela Aguilera - 2013 - Critica 45 (133):55-81.
    Uno de los argumentos en favor de la dependencia entre lenguaje y conceptos descansa en la premisa de que la posesión de conceptos involucra pensamientos de segundo orden y éstos, a su vez, requieren lenguaje. Este trabajo se centra en una variante de este argumento formulada por José Luis Bermúdez. Sostendré que aun cuando el pensamiento de segundo orden suponga competencia lingüística, no es necesario aceptar esa premisa. Propondré, en cambio, dos condiciones alternativas para la posesión de conceptos, la identificación (...)
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  2. Peacocke's Thoughts.Richard E. Aquila - 1987 - Inquiry 30 (1 & 2):195 – 205.
  3. Arthur Peacocke: "Intimations of Reality". [REVIEW]William H. Austin - 1987 - The Thomist 51 (1):194.
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  4. Truly Understood, by Christopher Peacocke.J. L. Bermudez - 2011 - Mind 120 (480):1276-1280.
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  5. Naturalism and Conceptual Norms.Jose Luis Bermudez - 1999 - Philosophical Quarterly 50 (194):77-85.
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  6. Holistic Explanation by Christopher Peacocke. [REVIEW]Akeel Bilgrami - 1984 - Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):106-118.
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  7. Natural Kinds and Concepts: A Pragmatist and Methodologically Naturalistic Account.Ingo Brigandt - 2011 - In Jonathan Knowles & Henrik Rydenfelt (eds.), Pragmatism, Science and Naturalism. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing. pp. 171–196.
    In this chapter I lay out a notion of philosophical naturalism that aligns with pragmatism. It is developed and illustrated by a presentation of my views on natural kinds and my theory of concepts. Both accounts reflect a methodological naturalism and are defended not by way of metaphysical considerations, but in terms of their philosophical fruitfulness. A core theme is that the epistemic interests of scientists have to be taken into account by any naturalistic philosophy of science in general, and (...)
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  8. A Theory of Conceptual Advance: Explaining Conceptual Change in Evolutionary, Molecular, and Evolutionary Developmental Biology.Ingo Brigandt - 2006 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    The theory of concepts advanced in the dissertation aims at accounting for a) how a concept makes successful practice possible, and b) how a scientific concept can be subject to rational change in the course of history. Traditional accounts in the philosophy of science have usually studied concepts in terms only of their reference; their concern is to establish a stability of reference in order to address the incommensurability problem. My discussion, in contrast, suggests that each scientific concept consists of (...)
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  9. Conceptual Comparison and Conceptual Innovation.Harold I. Brown - manuscript
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  10. Sellars, Concepts, and Conceptual Change.Harold I. Brown - 1986 - Synthese 68 (August):275-307.
    A major theme of recent philosophy of science has been the rejection of the empiricist thesis that, with the exception of terms which play a purely formal role, the language of science derives its meaning from some, possibly quite indirect, correlation with experience. The alternative that has been proposed is that meaning is internal to each conceptual system, that terms derive their meaning from the role they play in a language, and that something akin to "meaning" flows from conceptual framework (...)
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  11. Putting Concepts to Work: Some Thoughts for the Twenty-First Century.Andy Clark & Jesse J. Prinz - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (1):57-69.
  12. Peacocke's Self-Knowledge.Annalisa Coliva - 2008 - Ratio 21 (1):13–27.
    knowledge. His proposal relies on the claim that first-order mental..
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  13. I concetti: Teorie ed esercizi.Annalisa Coliva - 2004 - Carocci.
  14. Concepts and Epistemic Individuation (Christopher Peacocke).Wayne A. Davis - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):290-325.
    Christopher Peacocke has presented an original version of the perennial philosophical thesis that we can gain substantive metaphysical and epistemological insight from an analysis of our concepts. Peacocke's innovation is to look at how concepts are individuated by their possession conditions, which he believes can be specified in terms of conditions in which certain propositions containing those concepts are accepted. The ability to provide such insight is one of Peacocke's major arguments for his theory of concepts. I will critically examine (...)
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  15. Concepts and Epistemic Individuation.Wayne A. Davis - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):290-325.
    Christopher Peacocke has presented an original version of the perennial philosophical thesis that we can gain substantive metaphysical and epistemological insight from an analysis of our concepts. Peacocke's innovation is to look at how concepts are individuated by their possession conditions, which he believes can be specified in terms of conditions in which certain propositions containing those concepts are accepted. The ability to provide such insight is one of Peacocke's major arguments for his theory of concepts. I will critically examine (...)
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  16. Spinning Threads: Peacocke on Moderate Rationalism.De Gaynesford Robert - unknown
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  17. Spinning Threads: Peacocke on Moderate Rationalism.Robert De Gaynesford - unknown
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  18. Spinning Threads: Peacocke on Moderate Rationalism.Robert De Gaynesford - unknown
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  19. Spinning Threads: Peacocke on Moderate Rationalism.Robert De Gaynesford - unknown
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  20. The Non-Circularity Constraint: Peacocke Vs. Peacocke.Dan López de Sa - 2003 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 22 (1-2):85-93.
    According to the view that Peacocke elaborates in A Study of Concepts (1992), a concept can be individuated by providing the conditions a thinker must satisfy in order to possess that concept. Hence possessions conditions for concepts should be specifiable in a way that respects a non-circularity constraint. In a more recent paper “Implicit Conceptions, Understanding and Rationality” (1998a) Peacocke argues against his former view, in the light of the phenomenon of rationally accepting principles which do not follow from what (...)
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  21. Dual Character Concepts in Social Cognition: Commitments and the Normative Dimension of Conceptual Representation.Del Pinal Guillermo & Reuter Kevin - 2016 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    The concepts expressed by social role terms such as artist and scientist are unique in that they seem to allow two independent criteria for categorization, one of which is inherently normative. This study presents and tests an account of the content and structure of the normative dimension of these “dual character concepts.” Experiment 1 suggests that the normative dimension of a social role concept represents the commitment to fulfill the idealized basic function associated with the role. Background information can affect (...)
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  22. Concepts: Fodor's Little Semantic BBs of Thought - A Critical Look at Fodor's Theory of Concepts -.Eric Dietrich - 2001 - J. Of Experimental and Theoretical AI 13 (2):89-94.
    I find it interesting that AI researchers don't use concepts very often in their theorizing. No doubt they feel no pressure to. This is because most AI researchers do use representations which allow a system to chunk up its environment, and basically all we know about concepts is that they are representations which allow a system to chunk up its environment.
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  23. Concepts and Inference.Jonathan S. B. T. Evans - 1989 - Mind and Language 4 (1-2):29-34.
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  24. Having Concepts: A Brief Refutation of the Twentieth Century.Jerry A. Fodor - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (1):29-47.
  25. Replies to Critics.Jerry A. Fodor - 2000 - Mind and Language 15 (2-3):350-374.
  26. Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong.Jerry A. Fodor - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    The renowned philosopher Jerry Fodor, a leading figure in the study of the mind for more than twenty years, presents a strikingly original theory on the basic constituents of thought. He suggests that the heart of cognitive science is its theory of concepts, and that cognitive scientists have gone badly wrong in many areas because their assumptions about concepts have been mistaken. Fodor argues compellingly for an atomistic theory of concepts, deals out witty and pugnacious demolitions of rival theories, and (...)
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  27. Concepts: A Potboiler.Jerry A. Fodor - 1995 - Philosophical Issues 50 (1-3):133-51.
  28. Sprechen über die Welt. Zu Robert Brandoms "Making it explicit".Johannes Haag - 2002 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 109 (2):323-342.
  29. Immanent and Transcendent Approaches to the Theory of Meaning.Gilbert Harman - 1990 - In Roger Gibson & Robert B. Barrett (eds.), Perspectives on Quine. Blackwell.
  30. Peirce's Contributions to Constructivism and Personal Construct Psychology: II. Science, Logic and Construction.Procter Harry - 2016 - Personal Construct Theory and Practice 13:210-265.
    Kelly suggested that it was useful to consider anyone as functioning as a scientist, in the business of applying theories, making hypotheses and predictions and testing them out in the practice of everyday life. One of Charles Peirce’s major contributions was to develop the disciplines of logic and the philosophy of science. We can deepen and enrich our understanding of Kelly’s vision by looking at what Peirce has to say about the process of science. For Peirce, the essence of science (...)
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  31. Review: Belief, Simulation and the First Person: Comments on A Study of Concepts by Christopher Peacocke. [REVIEW]Jane Heal - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (2):413 - 417.
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  32. A Nonmonotonic Sequent Calculus for Inferentialist Expressivists.Ulf Hlobil - 2016 - In Pavel Arazim & Michal Dančák (eds.), The Logica Yearbook 2015. College Publications. pp. 87-105.
    I am presenting a sequent calculus that extends a nonmonotonic consequence relation over an atomic language to a logically complex language. The system is in line with two guiding philosophical ideas: (i) logical inferentialism and (ii) logical expressivism. The extension defined by the sequent rules is conservative. The conditional tracks the consequence relation and negation tracks incoherence. Besides the ordinary propositional connectives, the sequent calculus introduces a new kind of modal operator that marks implications that hold monotonically. Transitivity fails, but (...)
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  33. The Non-Circularity Constraint: Peacocke Vs. Peacocke. L. - 2003 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 22 (1-2):85-93.
    According to the view that Peacocke elaborates in _A Study of Concepts_ (1992), a concept can be individuated by providing the conditions a thinker must satisfy in or- der to possess that concept. Hence possessions conditions for concepts should be specifiable in a way that respects a non-circularity constraint. In a more recent paper.
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  34. Peacocke and Kraemer on Butler's Problem.E. J. Lowe - 1980 - Analysis 40 (3):113 - 118.
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  35. Blueprint for a Science of Mind: A Critical Notice of Christopher Peacocke's a Study of Concepts.Kirk A. Ludwig - 1994 - Mind and Language 9 (4):469-491.
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  36. Critical Notice of Christopher Peacocke,'The Realm of Reason'.Brad Majors - 2005 - Philosophical Papers 34 (2).
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  37. Concepts: Core Readings.Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.) - 1999 - MIT Press.
    The first part of the book centers around the fall of the Classical Theory of Concepts in the face of attacks by W. V. O. Quine, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Eleanor..
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  38. How to Use a Concept You Reject.Mark McCullagh - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (243):293-319.
    Inferentialist accounts of concept possession are often supported by examples in which rejection of some inference seems to amount to rejection of some concept, with the apparently implausible consequence that anyone who rejects the inference cannot so much as understand those who use the concept. This consequence can be avoided by distinguishing conditions necessary for direct uses of a concept (to describe the non-cognitive world) from conditions necessary for content-specifying uses (to specify what someone thinks or says). I consider how (...)
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  39. Response to Peacocke.John McDowell - 1998 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58:414-99.
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  40. Possessing Concepts: Christopher Peacocke's a Study of Concepts. [REVIEW]Alan Millar - 1994 - Mind 103 (409):73-82.
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  41. A Bet with Peacocke.R. G. Millikan - 1995 - In Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (eds.), Philosophy of Psychology: Debates on Psychological Explanation. Blackwell. pp. 285--292.
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  42. Can Concepts Ground Apriori Knowledge? Peacocke's Referential Turn and its Challenges.Nenad Miščević - 2008 - Acta Analytica 23 (3):233-256.
    The paper is a critical examination of Peacocke’s pioneering work on concepts as grounding the possibility of a priori knowledge. It focuses upon his more recent turn to reference and referential domain, and the two enlargements of the purely conceptual bases for apriority, namely appeal to conceptions and to direct referential sensitivity. I argue that the two are needed, but they produce more problem for the strategy as a whole than they solve. I conclude by suggesting that they point to (...)
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  43. Cristopher Peacocke, The Realm Of Reason.Nenad Miščević - 2005 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 14:377-380.
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  44. Posséder Un Concept Selon Peacocke.Martin Montminy - 2001 - Dialogue 40 (02):219-.
  45. Two Constraints on a Theory of Concepts.Andrea Onofri - 2016 - Dialectica 70 (1):3-27.
    Two general principles have played a crucial role in the recent debate on concepts. On the one hand, we want to allow different subjects to have the same concepts, thus accounting for concept publicity: concepts are ‘the sort of thing that people can, and do, share’. On the other hand, a subject who finds herself in a so-called ‘Frege case’ appears to have different concepts for the same object: for instance, Lois Lane has two distinct concepts SUPERMAN and CLARK KENT (...)
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  46. Review: Discussion of Christopher Peacocke's A Study of Concepts. [REVIEW]David Papineau - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (2):425 - 432.
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  47. A Study of Concepts.Peacocke Christopher - 1992 - MIT Press.
  48. Conceiving of Conscious States.Christopher Peacocke - 2012 - In J. Ellis & D. Guevara (eds.), Wittgenstein and the Philosophy of Mind. Oxford University Press.
    For a wide range of concepts, a thinker’s understanding of what it is for a thing to fall under the concept plausibly involves knowledge of an identity. It involves knowledge that the thing has to have the same property as is exemplified in instantiation of the concept in some distinguished, basic instance. This paper addresses the question: can we apply this general model of the role of identity in understanding to the case of subjective, conscious states? In particular, can we (...)
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  49. Rationale and Maxims in the Study of Concepts.Christopher Peacocke - 2005 - Noûs 39 (1):167-78.
    Is there any good reason for thinking that a concept is individuated by the condition for a thinker to possess it? Why is that approach superior to alternative accounts of the individuation of concepts? These are amongst the fundamental questions raised by Wayne Davis.
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  50. Interrelations: Concepts, Knowledge, Reference and Structure.Christopher Peacocke - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (1):85-98.
    What are the relations between the items mentioned in my title? This question is raised by Jerry Fodor.
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