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  1. added 2018-12-18
    Resisting Structural Epistemic Injustice.Michael D. Doan - 2018 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 4 (4).
    What form must a theory of epistemic injustice take in order to successfully illuminate the epistemic dimensions of struggles that are primarily political? How can such struggles be understood as involving collective struggles for epistemic recognition and self-determination that seek to improve practices of knowledge production and make lives more liveable? In this paper, I argue that currently dominant, Fricker-inspired approaches to theorizing epistemic wrongs and remedies make it difficult, if not impossible, to understand the epistemic dimensions of historic and (...)
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  2. added 2018-10-04
    Fostering Inclusivity Through Social Justice Education: An Interdisciplinary Approach (in Breaking Down Silos: Innovation, Collaboration, and EDI Across Disciplines).Paul E. Carron & Charles McDaniel (eds.) - forthcoming - Rowman and Littlefield.
    Teaching at a private, conservative religious institution poses unique challenges for equality, diversity, and inclusivity education (EDI). Given the realities of the student population in the Honors College of a private, religious institution, it is necessary to first introduce students to the contemporary realities of inequality and oppression and thus the need for EDI. This chapter proposes a conceptual framework and pedagogical suggestions for teaching basic concepts of social justice in a team-taught, interdisciplinary social science course. The course integrates four (...)
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  3. added 2018-08-23
    Legal Subversion of the Criminal Justice Process? Judicial, Prosecutorial and Police Discretion in Edmondson, Kindrat and Brown.Lucinda Vandervort - 2012 - In Elizabeth Sheehy (ed.), SEXUAL ASSAULT IN CANADA: LAW, LEGAL PRACTICE & WOMEN'S ACTIVISM,. Ottawa, ON, Canada: Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press. pp. 111-150.
    In 2001, three non-Aboriginal men in their twenties were charged with the sexual assault of a twelve year old Aboriginal girl in rural Saskatchewan. Legal proceedings lasted almost seven years and included two preliminary hearings, two jury trials, two retrials with juries, and appeals to the provincial appeal court and the Supreme Court of Canada. One accused was convicted. The case raises questions about the administration of justice in sexual assault cases in Saskatchewan. Based on observation and analysis of the (...)
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  4. added 2018-02-17
    Africanising Institutional Culture: What Is Possible and Plausible.Thaddeus Metz - 2017 - In Michael Cross & Amasa Ndofirepi (eds.), Knowledge and Change in African Universities, Volume 2. Sense Publishers. pp. 19-41.
  5. added 2017-09-22
    So Goes the Nation? (Review of The Fifty Year Rebellion). [REVIEW]Michael D. Doan - 2017 - Riverwise Magazine 1 (3):30.
    The Fifty-Year Rebellion invites us to consider Detroit’s recent history as both epitomizing and shaping national trends. But it’s not the kind of invitation we’ve all grown used to...
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  6. added 2017-05-31
    What's Wrong with Differential Punishment?Benjamin S. Yost - 2017 - Utilitas 29 (3):257-285.
    Half of the drug offenders incarcerated in the United States are black, even though whites and blacks use and sell drugs at the same rate, and blacks make up only 13 percent of the population. Noncomparativists about retributive justice see nothing wrong with this picture; for them, an offender’s desert is insensitive to facts about other offenders. By contrast, comparativists about retributive justice assert that facts about others can partially determine an offender’s desert. Not surprisingly, comparativists, especially comparative egalitarians, contend (...)
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  7. added 2017-05-20
    Detroit to Flint and Back Again: Solidarity Forever.Michael D. Doan, Ami Harbin & Sharon Howell - 2017 - Critical Sociology 43.
    For several years the authors have been working in Detroit with grassroots coalitions resisting Emergency Management. In this essay, we focus on how community groups in Detroit and Flint advanced common struggles for clean, safe, affordable water as a human right, particularly during the period of 2014 to 2016. We explore how, through a series of direct interventions – including public meetings and international gatherings, independent journalism and social media, community-based research projects, and citizen-led policy initiatives – these groups contributed (...)
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  8. added 2017-02-26
    Epistemic Injustice and Epistemic Redlining.Michael D. Doan - 2017 - Ethics and Social Welfare 11 (2):177-190.
    The practice of Emergency Management in Michigan raises anew the question of whose knowledge matters to whom and for what reasons, against the background of what projects, challenges, and systemic imperatives. In this paper, I offer a historical overview of state intervention laws across the United States, focusing specifically on Michigan’s Emergency Manager laws. I draw on recent analyses of these laws to develop an account of a phenomenon that I call epistemic redlining, which, I suggest, is a form of (...)
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  9. added 2016-09-26
    A Plea for Anti-Anti-Individualism: How Oversimple Psychology Misleads Social Policy.Alex Madva - 2016 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 3:701-728.
    This essay responds to the criticism that contemporary efforts to redress discrimination and inequality are overly individualistic. Critics of individualism emphasize that these systemic social ills stem not from the prejudice, irrationality, or selfishness of individuals, but from underlying structural-institutional forces. They are skeptical, therefore, of attempts to change individuals’ attitudes while leaving structural problems intact. I argue that the insistence on prioritizing structural over individual change is problematic and misleading. My view is not that we should instead prioritize individual (...)
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  10. added 2016-03-28
    The Imperative of Integration.Elizabeth Anderson - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    More than forty years have passed since Congress, in response to the Civil Rights Movement, enacted sweeping antidiscrimination laws in the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Fair Housing Act of 1968. As a signal achievement of that legacy, in 2008, Americans elected their first African American president. Some would argue that we have finally arrived at a postracial America, butThe Imperative of Integration indicates otherwise. Elizabeth Anderson demonstrates that, despite progress toward racial (...)
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  11. added 2016-01-14
    Structural Racism, Institutional Agency, and Disrespect.Andrew J. Pierce - 2014 - Journal of Philosophical Research 39:23-42.
    In recent work, Joshua Glasgow has offered a definition of racism that is supposed to put to rest the debates between cognitive, behavioral, attitudinal, and institutionalist definitions. The key to such a definition, he argues, is the idea of disrespect. He claims: “φ is racist if and only if φ is disrespectful toward members of racialized group R as Rs.” While this definition may capture an important commonality among cognitive, behavioral, and attitudinal accounts of racism, I argue that his attempt (...)
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  12. added 2015-10-07
    Death and Other Penalties: Philosophy in a Time of Mass Incarceration.Lisa Guenther, Geoffrey Adelsberg & Scott Zeman (eds.) - 2015 - Fordham UP.
    Motivated by a conviction that mass incarceration and state execution are among the most important ethical and political problems of our time, the contributors to this volume come together from a diverse range of backgrounds to analyze, critique, and envision alternatives to the injustices of the U.S. prison system, with recourse to deconstruction, phenomenology, critical race theory, feminism, queer theory, and disability studies. They engage with the hyper-incarceration of people of color, the incomplete abolition of slavery, the exploitation of prisoners (...)
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  13. added 2015-08-25
    Philosophy Imprisoned: The Love of Wisdom in the Age of Mass Incarceration (Book Chapter).Eric Anthamatten, Anders Benander, Natalie Cisneros, Michael DeWilde, Vincent Greco, Timothy Greenlee, Spoon Jackson, Arlando Jones, Drew Leder, Chris Lenn, John Douglas Macready, Lisa McLeod, William Muth, Cynthia Nielsen, Aislinn O’Donnell & Andre Pierce - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    Western philosophy’s relationship with prisons stretches from Plato’s own incarceration to the modern era of mass incarceration. Philosophy Imprisoned: The Love of Wisdom in the Age of Mass Incarceration draws together a broad range of philosophical thinkers, from both inside and outside prison walls, in the United States and beyond, who draw on a variety of critical perspectives (including phenomenology, deconstruction, and feminist theory) and historical and contemporary figures in philosophy (including Kant, Hegel, Foucault, and Angela Davis) to think about (...)
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  14. added 2015-02-20
    Subversive Humor.Chris A. Kramer - 2015 - Dissertation, Marquette
    Oppression is easily recognized. That is, at least, when oppression results from overt, consciously professed racism, for example, in which violence, explicit exclusion from economic opportunities, denial of adequate legal access, and open discrimination perpetuate the subjugation of a group of people. There are relatively clear legal remedies to such oppression. But this is not the case with covert oppression where the psychological harms and resulting legal and economic exclusion are every bit as real, but caused by concealed mechanisms subtly (...)
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  15. added 2015-02-16
    Will the Real Tolerant Racist Please Stand Up?Magali Bessone - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (3):209-223.
    One of the most perplexing paradoxes of toleration concerns the ‘tolerant racist’. According to most current definitions of toleration, a person is considered tolerant if, and only if, 1) he refrains from interfering with something 2) he deeply disapproves of, 3) in spite of having the power to interfere. Hence, a racist who refrains from discriminating against members of races he considers inferior despite having the power to do so, should be considered a tolerant person. Moreover, a person can apparently (...)
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  16. added 2015-02-16
    Race, Racism, and Reparations.J. Angelo Corlett - 2005 - Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (4):568–585.
  17. added 2014-09-05
    Unpacking “Institutional Racism”.T. J. Berard - 2010 - Schutzian Research 2:109-133.
    Overt racism and discrimination have been on the decline in the United States for at least two generations. Yet many American institutions continue to produce racial disparities. Sociologists and social critics have predominantly explained continuing disparities as results of continuing racism and discrimination, albeit in increasingly covert, anonymous forms; these critics suggest racism and discrimination have to be understood as historical, systemic problems operating at the level of institutions, culture, and society, even if overt forms are now rare. With increasing (...)
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  18. added 2014-03-28
    Conceptualizing a du Boisian Philosophy of Education: Toward a Model for African-American Education.Derrick P. Alridge - 1999 - Educational Theory 49 (3):359-379.
  19. added 2014-03-27
    Populism and Elitism in African-American Political Thought.Bernard Boxill - 1997 - The Journal of Ethics 1 (3):209-238.
    African-American political thought finds its premises in European philosophical traditions. But these traditions often challenge African-American humanity which African-American political thought defends. African-American political thought is therefore an extended commentary on the consistency of European philosophical traditions.
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  20. added 2014-03-19
    Latino/as, Asian Americans, and the Black–White Binary.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2003 - The Journal of Ethics 7 (1):5-27.
    This paper aims to contribute toward coalitionbuilding by showing that, even if we try tobuild coalition around what might look like ourmost obvious common concern – reducing racism –the dominant discourse of racial politics inthe United States inhibits an understanding ofhow racism operates vis-à-vis Latino/as andAsian Americans, and thus proves more of anobstacle to coalition building than an aid. Theblack/white paradigm, which operates to governracial classifications and racial politics inthe U.S., takes race in the U.S. to consist ofonly two racial (...)
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  21. added 2013-10-01
    Fanon and the Decolonization of Philosophy.Elizabeth A. Hoppe & Tracey Nicholls (eds.) - 2010 - Lexington (Rowman & Littlefield).
    Fanon and the Decolonization of Philosophy explores the range of ways in which Frantz Fanon's decolonization theory can reveal new answers to perennial philosophical questions and new paths to social justice. The aim is to show not just that Fanon's thought remains philosophically relevant, but that it is relevant to an even wider range of philosophical issues than has previously been realized. The essays in this book are written by both renowned Fanon scholars and new scholars who are emerging as (...)
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  22. added 2013-04-16
    Book Review:African-American Perspectives on Biomedical Ethics. Harley E. Flack, Edmund D. Pelligrino. [REVIEW]Anita L. Allen - 1994 - Ethics 104 (2):404-.
  23. added 2013-01-04
    The Double Face of the Political and the Social: Hannah Arendt and America's Racial Divisions.Robert Bernasconi - 1996 - Research in Phenomenology 26 (1):3-24.
  24. added 2013-01-04
    Racist Symbols: Reply to George Schedler.Torin Alter - unknown
    A symbol might have racist connotations in the sense that a substantial portion of the relevant population associates it with racist values or institutions. A governmental symbol display might therefore carry racist connotations that the government doesn’t intend, including connotations that haven’t always been attached to the symbol. So I claimed recently in the pages of this journal (Alter 2000b). I also explained how those claims create problems for some of George Schedler’s (1998) main views about governmental displays of the (...)
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