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  1. Parallelism, Interactionism, and Causation.Laird Addis - 1984 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 9 (1):329-344.
    One may gather from the arguments of two of the last papers published before his death that J. L. Mackie held the following three theses concerning the mind/body problem : (1) There is a distinct realm of mental properties, so a dualism of properties at least is true and materialism false.
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  2. What Descartes Did Not Know.Kristoffer Ahlstrom - 2010 - Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (3):297-311.
    Descartes’ epistemologies of meditation and sense imply that we cannot know anything about the mind-body union, either in the Cartesian sense of having scientia or, more interestingly, in terms of any other concept of knowledge available to Descartes. After considering the implications of this conclusion for what we may know about mind-body interaction, it becomes clear that, on Descartes’ view, we at best can be said to know that mind-body interaction, if it does in fact take place, does not violate (...)
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  3. Felix Młynarski - Individualism and Interactionism.Zbigniew Ambrożewicz - 2010 - Diametros:124-144.
    In this article I discuss the rarely analyzed work of the Polish philosopher, sociologist, and economist Felix Młynarski. I present him against the background of contemporary intellectual currents and place him in the current of humanistic sociology, philosophy of life, and pragmatism. I also try to point out the original elements of his thought, emphasizing those which can be identified as individualism and interactionism.
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  4. Since Physical Formulas Are Not Violated, No Soul Controls the Body.Leonard Angel - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 377-391.
    This paper provides evidence from the history of the natural sciences in philosophy (particularly mathematical physics, chemistry, and biology) that a “piloting” soul would have to make physical changes in human beings violating well-established physical laws. But, among other things, it has been discovered that there can be no such changes, and thus that there is no piloting soul. -/- 1. Introduction -- 2. Suitable Restrictions in Physical Theories -- 3. Evidence that Physical Formulas are not Violated -- 4. How (...)
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  5. The Roots of “Radical Interactionism”.Lonnie Athens - 2009 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (4):387-414.
    A plea has been made for replacing the perspective of “symbolic interactionism” with a new interactionist's perspective—“radical interactionism.” Unlike in symbolic interactionism, where Mead's and Blumer's ideas play the most prominent roles, in radical interactionism's, Park's ideas play a more prominent role than either Mead's or Blumer's ideas. On the one hand, according to Mead, the general principle behind the organization of human group life was once dominance, but it is now “sociality.” On the other hand, according to Park, this (...)
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  6. Introduction.Keith Augustine - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 1-47.
    The Introduction provides a general overview of the issues discussed in The Myth of an Afterlife in more detail in the individual selections, structured according to the four parts of the volume, plus preceding introductory and subsequent concluding comments. -/- 1. Preliminary Considerations -- 2. Empirical Arguments for Annihilation -- 3. Conceptual and Empirical Difficulties for Survival -- 4. Problematic Models of the Afterlife -- 5. Dubious Evidence for Survival -- 6. The Importance of Empirical Considerations -- 7. Alternative Paranormal (...)
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  7. The Dualist’s Dilemma: The High Cost of Reconciling Neuroscience with a Soul.Keith Augustine & Yonatan I. Fishman - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 203-292.
    Tight correlations between mental states and brain states have been observed time and again within the ethology of biologically ingrained animal behaviors, the comparative psychology of animal minds, the evolutionary psychology of mental adaptations, the behavioral genetics of inherited mental traits, the developmental psychology of the maturing mind, the psychopharmacology of mind-altering substances, and cognitive neuroscience more generally. They imply that our mental lives are only made possible because of brain activity—that having a functioning brain is a necessary condition for (...)
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  8. The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case Against Life After Death.Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.) - 2015 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    Because every single one of us will die, most of us would like to know what—if anything—awaits us afterward, not to mention the fate of lost loved ones. Given the nearly universal vested interest we personally have in deciding this question in favor of an afterlife, it is no surprise that the vast majority of books on the topic affirm the reality of life after death without a backward glance. But the evidence of our senses and the ever-gaining strength of (...)
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  9. Does Interactionism Violate a Law of Classical Physics?Edward W. Averill & Bernard Keating - 1981 - Mind 90 (January):102-7.
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  10. Review Of: The Waning of Materialism. [REVIEW]Andrew M. Bailey - 2011 - Mind 120 (478):534-538.
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  11. No Pairing Problem.Andrew M. Bailey, Joshua Rasmussen & Luke van Horn - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 154 (3):349-360.
    Many have thought that there is a problem with causal commerce between immaterial souls and material bodies. In Physicalism or Something Near Enough, Jaegwon Kim attempts to spell out that problem. Rather than merely posing a question or raising a mystery for defenders of substance dualism to answer or address, he offers a compelling argument for the conclusion that immaterial souls cannot causally interact with material bodies. We offer a reconstruction of that argument that hinges on two premises: Kim’s Dictum (...)
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  12. Irreducibly Conscious. Selected Papers on Consciousness.Alexander Batthyany & Avshalom C. Elitzur (eds.) - 2009 - Winter.
  13. Psycho-Physical Dualism Today: An Interdisciplinary Approach.Friedrich Beck, Carl Johnson, Franz von Kutschera, E. Jonathan Lowe, Uwe Meixner, David S. Oderberg, Ian J. Thompson & Henry Wellman - 2008 - Lexington Books.
    Until quite recently, mind-body dualism has been regarded with deep suspicion by both philosophers and scientists. This has largely been due to the widespread identification of dualism in general with one particular version of it: the interactionist substance dualism of Réné Descartes. This traditional form of dualism has, ever since its first formulation in the seventeenth century, attracted numerous philosophical objections and is now almost universally rejected in scientific circles as empirically inadequate. During the last few years, however, renewed attention (...)
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  14. Minds and Machines: A Radical Dualist Perspective.John Beloff - 1994 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (1):32-37.
    The article begins with a discussion about what might constitute consciousness in entities other than oneself and the implications of the mind-brain debate for the possibility of a conscious machine. While referring to several other facets of the philosophy of mind, the author focuses on epiphenomenalism and interactionism and presents a critique of the former in terms of biological evolution. The interactionist argument supports the relevance of parapsychology to the problem of consciousness and the statistical technique of meta-analysis is cited (...)
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  15. Mind-Body Interactionism in Light of the Parapsychological Evidence.John Beloff - 1976 - Theoria to Theory 10 (May):125-37.
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  16. Hermeneutics and Symbolic Interactionism: The Problem of Solipsism. [REVIEW]Kieran Bonner - 1994 - Human Studies 17 (2):225 - 249.
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  17. Why Survival is Metaphysically Impossible.Raymond D. Bradley - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 297-328.
    Human bodies have a totally different mode of existence from those collections of mental properties (intelligence, will power, consciousness, etc.) that we call minds. They belong to the ontological category of physical substances or entities, whereas mental properties belong to the ontological category of properties or attributes, and as such can exist only so long as their physical bearers exist. Mental properties “emerge” (in a sense that makes emergence ubiquitous throughout the natural world) when the constituent parts of a biological (...)
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  18. Interaction and Physiology.John Bricke - 1975 - Mind 84 (April):255-9.
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  19. Objectivism and Interaction: A Reaction to Margolis.May Brodbeck - 1966 - Philosophy of Science 33 (September):287-292.
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  20. The Substance of Consciousness: An Argument for Interactionism.M. Buncombe - 1995 - Avebury.
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  21. Symbolic Interactionism and Critical Perspective: Divergent or Synergistic?Patricia M. Burbank & Diane C. Martins - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 11 (1):25-41.
    Throughout their history, symbolic interactionism and critical perspective have been viewed as divergent theoretical perspectives with different philosophical underpinnings. A review of their historical and philosophical origins reveals both points of divergence and areas of convergence. Their underlying philosophies of science and views of human freedom are different as is their level of focus with symbolic interactionism having a micro perspective and critical perspective using a macro perspective. This micro/macro difference is reflected in the divergence of their major concepts, goals (...)
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  22. Popper et le problème du corps et de l’'me'.Thomas Chabin - 2007 - Philosophia Scientiae 11 (1):159-193.
    The mind-body problem is one of the main centers of reflexion of contemporary philosophy. Generally coming from the supposed failure of the Cartesian interactionist dualism, most philosophers of the mind adopt a physicalist ontology. However, according to Popper, this one seems to meet with insuperable difficulties: it can’t give physicalist explanation of rationality and freedom, of qualia; it can’t suggest a satisfactory explanation of the implementation of logical standards. That is why, as Popper explains in The Self and its Brain, (...)
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  23. How Cartesian Dualism Might Have Been True.David J. Chalmers - manuscript
    We could have been characters in a huge computer simulation. It is a familiar idea that the whole world might be simulated on a computer, and things would seem exactly the same to us (and indeed, who is to say that we are not).
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  24. Descartes's Interactionism and His Principle of Causality.Enrique Chávez‐Arvizo - 1997 - The European Legacy 2 (6):959-976.
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  25. Le panpsychisme de Bergson : une hypothèse sur la nature de la matière.Joël Dolbeault - 2013 - Philosophie 117 (1):38-54.
    Bergson est connu pour son dualisme psycho-physique. Mais, dans sa philosophie, on trouve aussi une conception panpsychiste de la matière : l’idée que la matière inerte est douée d’un degré minime de conscience. Or, il est intéressant de remarquer que ce panpsychisme constitue en fait une théorie de la causalité, plus précisément une interprétation ontologique des notions scientifiques de « force » et de « loi de la nature ». Si cette théorie est pertinente, comme nous le pensons, elle apporte (...)
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  26. Objections to Dualism.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    In this essay, I discuss the standard objections to substance dualism and conclude that they are far less formidable than is usually supposed.
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  27. The Human Psyche.John C. Eccles - 1980 - Berlin: Springer.
    The Human Psyche is an in-depth exploration of dualist-interactionism, a concept Sir John Eccles developed with Sir Karl Popper in the context of a wide...
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  28. Consciousness Makes a Difference: A Reluctant Dualist’s Confession.Avshalom C. Elitzur - 2009 - In A. Batthyany & A. C. Elitzur (eds.), Irreducibly Conscious: Selected Papers on Consciousness.
    This paper’s outline is as follows. In sections 1-3 I give an exposi¬tion of the Mind-Body Problem, with emphasis on what I believe to be the heart of the problem, namely, the Percepts-Qualia Nonidentity and its incompatibility with the Physical Closure Paradigm. In 4 I present the “Qualia Inaction Postulate” underlying all non-interactionist theo¬ries that seek to resolve the above problem. Against this convenient postulate I propose in section 5 the “Bafflement Ar¬gument,” which is this paper's main thesis. Sections 6-11 (...)
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  29. Consciousness Can No Longer Be Ignored.Avshalom C. Elitzur - 1995 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (4):353-58.
    Moody's thought-experiment invoking zombies to demonstrate the uniqueness of consciousness is commended. His conclusions accord well with previous ones arrived at by Penrose, Chalmers and myself. All these works lead to a disturbing conclusion: onsciousness, as something distinct from the brain processes, interferes with physical reality. Ergo, it is no longer possible to adhere to any of the modern theories of mind that preserve the completeness of physics. This conclusion is, in principle, testable.
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  30. Neither Idealism nor Materialism: A Reply to Snyder.Avshalom C. Elitzur - 1990 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 303 (2):303-307.
    Lack of distinction between the formalism of quantum mechanics and its various interpretations leads to some popular misrepresentations. As long as none of the interpretations can present an unambiguous empirical validation, their status remains purely philosophical. These arguments are shown to apply to Snyder's claims. Next it is shown that Snyder's critcism does not address the main points in the argument concerning the physical impact of consciousness. The reply concludes with some reflections on methodology in the search for a physical (...)
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  31. Consciousness and the Incompleteness of the Physical Explanation of Behavior.Avshalom C. Elitzur - 1989 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 10 (1):1-20.
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  32. Emergent Substances, Physical Properties, Action Explanations.Jeff Engelhardt - 2015 - Erkenntnis 80 (6):1125-1146.
    This paper proposes that if individual X ‘inherits’ property F from individual Y, we should be leery of explanations that appeal to X’s being F. This bears on what I’ll call “emergent substance dualism”, the view that human persons or selves are metaphysically fundamental or “new kinds of things with new kinds of causal powers” even though they depend in some sense on physical particulars :5–23, 2006; Personal agency. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2008). Two of the most prominent advocates of (...)
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  33. Christmas Mumming and Symbolic Interactionism.Melvin Firestone - 1978 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 6 (2):92-113.
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  34. Christmas Mumming and Symbolic Interactionism.Melvin Firestone - 1978 - Ethos 6 (2):92-113.
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  35. Chemistry and the Conservation of Energy: The Work of James Prescott Joule.John Forrester - 1975 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 6 (4):273-313.
  36. The Immaterial Self: A Defense of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of Mind.John A. Foster - 1991 - Routledge.
    The Immaterial Self examines and defends this thesis, and in particular argues for its Cartesian version, which assigns the non-physical ingredients of the ...
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  37. Defending Non-Epiphenomenal Event Dualism.Brian J. Garrett - 2000 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (3):393-412.
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  38. The Impossibility of Interaction Between Mind and Matter.E. Gaviola - 1936 - Philosophy of Science 3 (2):133-142.
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  39. Beyond Blumer and Symbolic Interactionism: The Qualitative-Quantitative Issue in Social Theory and Methodology.I. Hanzel - 2011 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (3):303-326.
    The article analysis the views approaching quantitative and qualitative methods in social sciences as separable or irreconcilable. First, we characterize these views and show how they deal with this divide and how they view the aspects of the latter. Next, we identify the works of Herbert Blumer as the basis of that divide and subject them to an analysis. Finally, by means of categories like quantity, quality, and measure, we show that the qualitative-quantitative divide is based on a wrong approach (...)
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  40. The Mind Matters: Consciousness and Choice in a Quantum World.David Hodgson - 1991 - Oxford Unversity Press.
    In this book, Hodgson presents a clear and compelling case against today's orthodox mechanistic view of the brain-mind, and in favor of the view that "the mind matters." In the course of the argument he ranges over such topics as consciousness, informal reasoning, computers, evolution, and quantum indeterminancy and non-locality. Although written from a philosophical viewpoint, the book has important implications for the sciences concerned with the brain-mind problem. At the same time, it is largely non-technical, and thus accessible to (...)
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  41. Descartes on Mind-Body Interaction.Daniel Holbrook - 1992 - Southwest Philosophical Studies 14:74-83.
    In his "Meditations on First Philosophy", Descartes argues for there being a radical difference between mind and body. Yet, we know that mind and body interest. How is this possible? Descartes's answer tothis question is that human nature is a "substantial union" of mind and body. In this essay, Descartes's solution is explained and critically examined.
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  42. Continuity and the Metaphysics of Dualism.Emmett L. Holman - 1984 - Philosophical Studies 45 (March):197-204.
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  43. The Brain That Doesn’T Know Itself: Persons Oblivious to Their Neurological Deficits.Jamie Horder - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 195-202.
    This paper surveys the neuroscientific evidence that brain lesions and drug intoxication can not only disrupt mental functions like perception and motor control, but can also remove one’s very awareness that these functions are impaired or altered. Such deficits imply that consciousness of one’s mental faculties, no less than the faculties themselves, is a product of particular neural structures. But this is inconsistent with any view—such as the dualistic interactionism of John Eccles—that holds that the conscious self interacts with and (...)
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  44. Interactionism and Innateness in the Evolutionary Study of Human Nature.Christopher D. Horvath - 2000 - Biology and Philosophy 15 (3):321-337.
    While most researchers who use evolutionary theory to investigatehuman nature especially human sexuality describe themselves as ``interactionists'', there is no clear consensus on the meaning of thisterm in this context. By interactionism most people in the fieldmean something like, both nature and nurture ``count'' in thedevelopment of human psychology and behavior. Nevertheless, themultidisciplinary nature of evolutionary psychology results in a widevariety of interpretations of this general claim. Today, mostdebates within evolutionary psychology about the innateness of agiven behavioral characteristic or over (...)
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  45. Interactionism Revived?Frank Jackson - 1980 - Philosophy of Social Science 10 (September):316-23.
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  46. What Could Pair a Nonphysical Soul to a Physical Body?Jaegwon Kim - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 335-347.
    This paper argues that since nonphysical souls lack a position in space, they cannot have the pairing relations that would allow them to interact with physical bodies. For example, if two rifles (A and B) are fired at the same time, and consequently Andy and Buddy are killed, we can only say that rifle A killed Andy while rifle B killed Buddy, rather than the other way around, if there are appropriate spatial relations (such as distance and orientation) that pair (...)
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  47. The Mind-Body Problem at Century's Turn.Jaegwon Kim - 2004 - In Brian Leiter (ed.), The Future for Philosophy. Clarendon Press. pp. 129-152.
    A plausible terminus for the mind-body debate begins by embracing ontological physicalism—the view that there is only one kind of substance in the concrete world, and that it is material substance. Taking mental causation seriously, this terminus also embraces conditional reductionism, the thesis that only physically reducible (i.e., functionalizable) mental properties can be causally efficacious. Intentional/cognitive properties (what David Chalmers calls “psychological” aspects of mind) are physically reducible, but qualia (“phenomenal” aspects of mind) are not. In saving the causal efficacy (...)
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  48. Conservation of Energy is Relevant to Physicalism.Ole Koksvik - 2007 - Dialectica 61 (4):573–582.
    I argue against Montero’s claim that Conservation of Energy (CoE) has nothing to do with Physicalism. I reject her reconstruction of the argument from CoE against interactionist dualism, and offer instead an alternative reconstruction that better captures the intuitions of those who believe that there is a conflict between interactionist dualism and CoE.
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  49. Dualist Mental Causation and the Exclusion Problem.Thomas Kroedel - 2015 - Noûs 49 (2):357-375.
    The paper argues that dualism can explain mental causation and solve the exclusion problem. If dualism is combined with the assumption that the psychophysical laws have a special status, it follows that some physical events counterfactually depend on, and are therefore caused by, mental events. Proponents of this account of mental causation can solve the exclusion problem in either of two ways: they can deny that it follows that the physical effect of a mental event is overdetermined by its mental (...)
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  50. Mind-Body Interactionism and the Conservation of Energy.Robert A. Larmer - 1986 - International Philosophical Quarterly 26 (September):277-85.
    One of the major reasons underlying the widespread rejection of the theory that the mind is an immaterial substance distinct from the body, But which nevertheless acts on the body, Is that it is felt that such a theory commits one to denying the principle of the conservation of energy. My aim in this article is to assess the strength of this objection. My thesis is that the usual replies are inadequate, But--Strong as this objection appears--Some important logical distinctions have (...)
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