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2018 found
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1 — 50 / 2018
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  1. The Dark Underbelly of Capitalism: Exploring the Capitalism-War Connection.Marius Nijenhuis - 2021 - Krisis 41 (2):138-142.
    Review of Maurizio Lazzarato Capital Hates Everyone. Fascism or Revolution. Los Angeles: Semiotext Interventions.
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  2. Ethical Considerations in Social Media Analytics in the Context of Migration: Lessons Learned From a Horizon 2020 Project.Jamie Mahoney, Kahina Le Louvier, Shaun Lawson, Diotima Bertel & Elena Ambrosetti - forthcoming - Research Ethics:174701612210875.
    Research Ethics, Ahead of Print. The ubiquitous use of social platforms across the globe makes them attractive options for investigating social phenomena including migration. However, the use of social media data raises several crucial ethical issues around the areas of informed consent, anonymity and profiling of individuals, which are particularly sensitive when looking at a population such as migrants, which is often considered as ‘vulnerable’. In this paper, we discuss how the opportunities and challenges related to social media research in (...)
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  3. La politica come affare di coscienza.Lucia Gangale - 2019 - Dialegesthai. Rivista Telematica di Filosofia 2019.
    L'intérêt pour la politique du pape émérite Joseph Ratzinger est ancien et s'est exprimé dans de nombreuses réunions publiques. Comme celui tenu au Parlement allemand à l'occasion du Voyage apostolique en Allemagne en 2011. Le discours qui fait l'objet d'analyse ici a été prononcé par Ratzinger le 22 septembre 2011 au Reichstag à Berlin. Le titre du discours de Ratzinger est : Affirmer la loi et combattre l'injustice. On peut aujourd'hui le lire dans son intégralité dans le volume « Libérer (...)
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  4. Why Migration Justice Still Requires Open Borders.Alex Sager - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    I revisit themes from Against Borders: Why the World Needs Free Movement of People(2020) in dialogue with Gillian Brock’s Justice of People on the Move(2020) and Sarah Song’sImmigration and Democracy (2019). We share the conviction that current border regimes are deeply unjust but differ in what migration justice requires. Brock and Song continue to give states significant discretion to exclude people from entering and settling in their territories, whereas I contend that migration justice demands open borders. I reject the claim (...)
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  5. Toxic Warrior Identity, Accountability, and Moral Risk.Jessica Wolfendale & Stoney Portis - 2021 - Journal of Military Ethics 20 (3-4):163-179.
    Academics working on military ethics and serving military personnel rarely have opportunities to talk to each other in ways that can inform and illuminate their respective experiences and approaches to the ethics of war. The workshop from which this paper evolved was a rare opportunity to remedy this problem. Our conversations about First Lieutenant (1LT) Portis’s experiences in combat provided a unique chance to explore questions about the relationship between oversight, accountability, and the idea of moral risk in military operations. (...)
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  6. Realism in the Ethics of Immigration.James S. Pearson - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism:019145372210796.
    The ethics of immigration is currently marked by a division between realists and idealists. The idealists generally focus on formulating morally ideal immigration policies. The realists, however, tend to dismiss these ideals as far-fetched and infeasible. In contrast to the idealists, the realists seek to resolve pressing practical issues relating to immigration, principally by advancing what they consider to be actionable policy recommendations. In this article, I take issue with this conception of realism. I begin by surveying the way in (...)
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  7. 2019 NASSP Book Award Panel - Reply to Commentators. The Boundaries of Battlefields, Collaboration Between Enemies, and Just War Theory.Yvonne Chiu - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:225-233.
    Reply to commentators: Symposium on the winner of the 2019 NASSP Book Award Prize: Yvonne Chiu, *Conspiring with the Enemy: The Ethic of Cooperation in Warfare* (Columbia University Press, 2019).
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  8. The Moral Status of Combatants: A New Theory of Just War.Michael Skerker - 2020 - London: Routledge.
    This book develops a new contractualist foundation for just war theory, which defends the traditional view of the moral equality of combatants and associated egalitarian moral norms. -/- Traditionally it has been viewed that combatants on both sides of a war have the same right to fight, irrespective of the justice of their cause, and both sides must observe the same restrictions on the use of force, especially prohibitions on targeting noncombatants. Revisionist philosophers have argued that combatants on the unjust (...)
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  9. Hannah Arendt’s International Agonism [한나 아렌트 논쟁 이론의 국제정치적 함의].Shinkyu Lee - 2021 - Korean Review of Political Thought [정치사상연구] 27 (2):215-244.
    Hannah Arendt’s fierce critique of sovereignty, along with her excavation of Greek agonism, has gained much traction among critical theorists of international politics who revisit the basic assumptions of conventional international theories, such as state sovereignty and power as domination. This paper engages with an increasingly popular stream within such critical international studies that appropriates Arendt’s agonism to envision a form of a global public acting in concert. I argue that Arendt’s thoughts cannot be reduced to a radical vision of (...)
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  10. Hannah Arendt and International Relations.Shinkyu Lee - 2021 - In Nukhet Sandal (ed.), Oxford Research Encyclopedia of International Studies. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 1-30.
    International relations (IR) scholars have increasingly integrated Hannah Arendt into their works. Her fierce critique of the conventional ideas of politics driven by rulership, enforcement, and violence has a particular resonance for theorists seeking to critically revisit the basic assumptions of IR scholarship. Arendt’s thinking, however, contains complexity and nuance that need careful treatment when extended beyond domestic politics. In particular, Arendt’s vision of free politics—characterized by the dualistic emphasis on agonistic action and institutional stability—raises two crucial issues that need (...)
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  11. Kymlicka’s Alignment of Mill and Engels: Nationality, Civilization, and Coercive Assimilation.Tim Beaumont - 2021 - Nationalities Papers (Online First).
    John Stuart Mill claims that free institutions are next to impossible in a multinational state. According to Will Kymlicka, this leads him to embrace policies kindred to those of Friedrich Engels, aimed at promoting mononational states in Europe through coercive assimilation. Given Mill’s harm principle, such coercive assimilation would have to be justified either paternalistically, in terms of its civilizing effects upon the would-be assimilated, or non-paternalistically, with reference to the danger that their non-assimilation would pose to others. However, neither (...)
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  12. El fin de lo humano en el concepto de desarrollo humano de Naciones Unidas.Felipe Correa - 2020 - Revista de Filosofía 19 (2):11-29.
    El concepto de desarrollo humano del Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD) surge en 1990 como una crítica a la consideración de la economía como el fin último de los esfuerzos del desarrollo. En la visión del PNUD, la economía es considerada un fin relativo, es decir, un fin y un medio para el desarrollo humano. Al considerar, por su parte, el fin del desarrollo humano, este es identificado con el ensanchamiento de las opciones y libertades de (...)
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  13. Government Transparency and Accountability During Covid 19: The Data Underpinning Decisions.Marie Oldfield - 2021
    Government transparency and accountability during Covid 19: The data underpinning decisions.
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  14. Government Transparency and Accountability During Covid 19: The Data Underpinning Decisions.Marie Oldfield - 2021 - Https://Committees.Parliament.Uk/Publications/5076/Documents/50285/Default/.
    Government transparency and accountability during Covid 19: The data underpinning decisions.
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  15. Call for Written Evidence - Risk Assessment and Risk Planning.Marie Oldfield - 2021 - UK Government Risk Enquiry.
    Call for Written evidence - Risk Assessment and Risk Planning.
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  16. Parliamentary Call for Evidence Written Evidence -Data Transparency and Accountability: Covid 19.Marie Oldfield - 2020 - UK Government.
    Call for evidence Written evidence - Data Transparency and Accountability: Covid 19 -/- .
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  17. Ethical Funding for Trustworthy AI: Proposals to Address the Responsibilities of Funders to Ensure That Projects Adhere to Trustworthy AI Practice.Marie Oldfield - 2021 - AI and Ethics 1 (1):1.
    AI systems that demonstrate significant bias or lower than claimed accuracy, and resulting in individual and societal harms, continue to be reported. Such reports beg the question as to why such systems continue to be funded, developed and deployed despite the many published ethical AI principles. This paper focusses on the funding processes for AI research grants which we have identified as a gap in the current range of ethical AI solutions such as AI procurement guidelines, AI impact assessments and (...)
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  18. Critical Notice of Economic Statecraft: Human Rights, Sanctions, and Conditionality, by Cécile Fabre. [REVIEW]Christian Barry - forthcoming - Mind.
    A Critical Notice of Economic Statecraft: Human Rights, Sanctions, and Conditionality, by Cécile Fabre.
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  19. Strangers in Our Midst: The Political Philosophy of Immigration D. Miller, 2016 Cambridge MA, Harvard University Press 240 Pp., £27.95. [REVIEW]Kevin K. W. Ip - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (4):857-859.
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  20. Target Acquired: The Ethics of Assassination.Nathan Gabriel Wood - manuscript
    In international law and the ethics of war, there are a variety of actions which are seen as particularly problematic and presumed to be always or inherently wrong, or in need of some overwhelmingly strong justification to override the presumption against them. One of these actions is assassination, in particular, assassination of heads of state. In this essay I argue that the presumption against assassination is incorrect. In particular, I argue that if in a given scenario war is justified, then (...)
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  21. Hume’s Dynamic Coordination and International Law.Carmen E. Pavel - 2021 - Political Theory 49 (2):215-242.
    At the heart of the tension between state autonomy and international law is the question of whether states should willingly restrict their freedom of action for the sake of international security, human rights, trade, communication, and the environment. David Hume offers surprising insights to answer this question. He argues that the same interests in cooperation arise among individuals as well as states and that their interactions should be regulated by the same principles. Drawing on his model of dynamic coordination, I (...)
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  22. Justice, Migration & Mercy. Michael Blake, 2020, Oxford, Oxford University Press, Ix+266 £22.99. [REVIEW]Daniel Sharp - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (1):175-177.
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  23. Protecting Democracy by Commingling Polities: The Case for Accepting Foreign Influence and Interference in Democratic Processes.Duncan MacIntosh - 2021 - In Duncan B. Hollis & Jens David Ohlin (eds.), Defending Democracies: Combating Foreign Election Interference in a Digital Age. Oxford University Press. pp. 93-114.
    This chapter criticizes several methods of responding to the techniques foreign powers are widely acknowledged to be using to subvert U.S. elections. It suggests that countries do this when they have a legitimate stake in each other’s political deliberations, but no formal voice in them. It also suggests that if they accord each other such a voice, they will engage as co-deliberators with arguments, rather than trying to undermine each other’s deliberative processes; and that this will be salutary for all (...)
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  24. The Anthropocene and the Republic.Marcel Wissenburg - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-18.
  25. Solidarity with Refugees: An Institutional Approach.Clara Sandelind & Luke Ulaş - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (4):564-582.
  26. In the Name of Culture: Cultural Relativism and the Abuse of the Individual.Elizabeth M. Zechenter - 1997 - Journal of Anthropological Research 53 (3):319-347.
  27. Third Worldist Relativism: A New Form of Imperialism.Ray Kiely - 1995 - Journal of Contemporary Asia 25 (2):159-178.
  28. Cultural Absolutism and the Nostalgia for Community.Rhoda E. Howard - 1993 - Human Rights Quarterly 15 (2):315-338.
  29. The Problem of Relativism in International Ethics.Terry Nardin - 1989 - Millennium - Journal of International Studies 18 (2):149-161.
  30. International Human Rights: Universalism Versus Relativism.Alison Dundes Renteln - 1990 - London: Sage.
    Are human rights universal? Universalists and cultural relativists have long been debating this question. In "INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS," Alison Dundes Renteln reconciles the two positions and argues that, within the vast array of cultural practices and values, it is possible to create structural equivalents to rights in all societies. She poses that empirical cross-cultural research can reveal universal human rights standards, then demonstrates it through an analysis of the concept of measured retribution. "INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS "is a classic socio-legal study (...)
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  31. Relativism and the Search for Human Rights.Alison Dundes Renteln - 1988 - American Anthropologist 90 (1):56-72.
  32. The Unanswered Challenge of Relativism and the Consequences for Human Rights.Alison Dundes Renteln - 1985 - Human Rights Quarterly 7 (4):514-540.
  33. Sufficiency, Priority, and Selecting Refugees.Mollie Gerver - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (5):713-730.
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  34. COVID-19: Against a Lockdown Approach.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):195-212.
    Governments around the world have faced the challenge of how to respond to the recent outbreak of a novel coronavirus disease. Some have reacted by greatly restricting the freedom of citizens, while others have opted for less drastic policies. In this paper, I draw a parallel with vaccination ethics to conceptualize two distinct approaches to COVID-19 that I call altruistic and lockdown. Given that the individual measures necessary to limit the spread of the virus can in principle be achieved voluntarily (...)
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  35. Crimmigration and the Ethics of Migration.José Jorge Mendoza - 2020 - Social Philosophy Today 36 (1):49-68.
    David Miller’s defense of a state’s presumptive right to exclude non-refugee immigrants rests on two key distinctions. The first is that immigration controls are “preventative” and not “coercive.” In other words, when a state enforces its immigration policy it does not coerce noncitizens into doing something as much as it prevents them from doing a very specific thing (e.g., not entering or remaining within the state), while leaving other options open. Second, he makes a distinction between “denying” people their human (...)
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  36. Justice in Transnational Governance.Helena de Bres - 2015 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (3):275-292.
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  37. 'A New Philosophy for International Law' and Dworkin's Political Realism.Eric Scarffe - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 29 (1).
    During his career, Ronald Dworkin wrote extensively on an impressive range of issues in moral, political, and legal philosophy, but, like many of his contemporaries, international law remained a topic of relative neglect. His most sustained work on international law is a posthumously published article, “A New Philosophy for International Law” (2013), which displays some familiar aspects of his views in general jurisprudence, in addition to some novel (though perhaps surprising) arguments as well. This paper argues that the moralized account (...)
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  38. Facilitating Access to a COVID-19 Vaccine Through Global Health Law.Lawrence O. Gostin, Safura Abdool Karim & Benjamin Mason Meier - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (3):622-626.
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  39. Migration Crisis and the Duty of Hospitality: A Kantian Discussion.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2020 - МЕЃУНАРОДЕН ДИЈАЛОГ: ИСТОК - ЗАПАД 7 (4):125-131.
    The European ideals – as well as the idea of Europe per se – are faced with a serious challenge due to recent migration crisis: it is not just the reflexes, the effectiveness and the policies, but also the consistency, the principles and the justification of the notion of the European Union that is in stake. Kant’s concept of universal hospitality could probably provide a good way out of this conundrum: while hospitality has largely been viewed as a solidarity-related imperfect (...)
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  40. Torture and American Exceptionalism.Christopher J. Einolf - 2020 - Criminal Justice Ethics 39 (2):152-162.
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  41. Pauvreté globale: Apports d'une critique féministe des approches de Singer et Pogge.Roxane Noël - 2016 - In Théories de la justice: Justice globale, agents de la justice et justice de genre. Louvain: pp. 335-341.
  42. Settler‐State Borders and the Question of Indigenous Immigrant Identity.Amy Reed-Sandoval - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (4):543-561.
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  43. The Rights of Others: Aliens, Residents and Citizens: An Ethical Appraisal of National Registration of Citizens 2019.Paul N. Rengma - unknown
    It deals with the issue of the CAA and NRC in India.
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  44. International Financial Credit Crises; Lessons From Canada.Muhammad Rashid - 2020 - Journal of Economics Bibliography 7 (2):101-110.
    The credit crises experienced in the US in year 2008 is labeled as perhaps the most significant crises since the great depression. The roots of the crises were found in the default of the sub-prime mortgages and the failure occurred in both the US and the UK. Due to the integrated nature of international financial systems the spillover impacted many countries as the economies in Asia and Europe were purchasers of the sub-prime mortgages that originated in both UK and US. (...)
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  45. The Necessity of Understanding Disasters in the Language of Suffering.Srajana Kaikini - 2020 - Voices in Bioethics 6.
    The categorization of disasters as natural or manmade does little for our understanding of the moral stakes of institutions and collectives involved in the aftermath of disasters. This paper presents a brief account of how disasters can be understood philosophically taking cues from studies in sociology. Having articulated the gap in conceptualizing disasters, the paper argues that an interpretation of disasters as “events of social suffering,” will help foreground the complex moral and phenomenological nature of such events to prompt a (...)
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  46. Refugees: The Politically Oppressed.Felix Bender - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 47 (5):615-633.
    Who should be recognized as a refugee? This article seeks to uncover the normative arguments at the core of legal and philosophical conceptions of refugeehood. It identifies three analytically distinct approaches grounding the right to refugee status and argues that all three are normatively inadequate. Refugee status should neither be grounded in individual persecution for specific reasons (classical approach) nor in individual persecution for any discriminatory reasons (human rights approach). It should also not be based solely on harm (humanitarian approach). (...)
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  47. The Human Right to Health: A Defense.Nicole Hassoun - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):158-179.
  48. Human Rights, the Political View, and TNCs: An Exploration.Laura Valentini - 2018 - In Tom Campbell & Kylie Bourne (eds.), Political and Legal Approaches to Human Rights. London, UK: pp. 168-86.
    A recently developed view in political theory holds that only political agents, particularly states, can be primary bearers of human-rights duties. Problematically, this so-called ‘political view’ appears unable to account for the human-rights responsibilities of powerful non-state actors, such as transnational corporations (TNCs). Can a recognizably political view respond to this concern? I show that, once the moral underpinnings of the political view are made explicit, it can. I suggest that, on the political view, what makes states primary bearers of (...)
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  49. May States Select Among Refugees?Max Gabriel Cherem - 2020 - Ethics and Global Politics 13 (1):33-49.
  50. LGBT Rights and Refugees: A Case for Prioritizing LGBT Status in Refugee Admissions.Annamari Vitikainen - 2020 - Ethics and Global Politics 13 (1):64-78.
1 — 50 / 2018