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  1. Private Military and Security Companies: Ethics, Policies and Civil-Military Relations.Andrew Alexandra, Deane-Peter Baker & Marina Caparini (eds.) - 2008 - Routledge.
  2. Review of Scott Barrett, Why Cooperate? The Incentive to Supply Global Public Goods. [REVIEW]Jonny Anomaly - 2009 - Journal of Social Economics 36 (11).
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  3. World Governance.Jovan Babić (ed.) - 2013, Paperback - Cambridge Scholars Press.
  4. Foreign Armed Intervention: Between Justified Aid and Illegal Violence.Jovan Babić - 2003 - In Aleksandar Jokic (ed.), The Ethics of Humanitarian Intervention. Broadview Press. pp. 45-70.
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  5. The Ethics of International Sanctions: The Case of Yugoslavia.Jovan Babić & Aleksandar Jokic - 2000 - Fletcher Forum of World Affairs (no. 2):107-119.
    Sanctions such as those applied by the United Nations against Yugoslavia, or rather the actions of implementing and maintaining them, at the very least implicitly purport to have moral justification. While the rhetoric used to justify sanctions is clearly moralistic, even sanctions themselves, as worded, often include phrases indicating moral implication. On May 30, 1992, United Nation Security Council Resolution 757 imposed a universal, binding blockage on all trade and all scientific, cultural and sports exchanges with Serbia and Montenegro. In (...)
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  6. Scepticism About Beneficiary Pays: A Critique.Christian Barry & Robert Kirby - 2015 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4).
    Some moral theorists argue that being an innocent beneficiary of significant harms inflicted by others may be sufficient to ground special duties to address the hardships suffered by the victims, at least when it is impossible to extract compensation from those who perpetrated the harm. This idea has been applied to climate change in the form of the beneficiary-pays principle. Other philosophers, however, are quite sceptical about beneficiary pays. Our aim in this article is to examine their critiques. We conclude (...)
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  7. How Should We Conceive of Individual Consumer Responsibility to Address Labour Injustices?Christian Barry & Kate Macdonald - forthcoming - In Yossi Dahan, Hanna Lerner & Faina Milman-Sivan (eds.), Global Justice and International Labour Rights. Cambridge University Press.
    Many approaches to addressing labour injustices—shortfalls from minimally decent wages and working conditions— focus on how governments should orient themselves toward other states in which such phenomena take place, or to the firms that are involved with such practices. But of course the question of how to regard such labour practices must also be faced by individuals, and individual consumers of the goods that are produced through these practices in particular. Consumers have become increasingly aware of their connections to complex (...)
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  8. Global Poverty.Christian Barry & Scott Wisor - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
  9. Value of Human Life: Different Cultures, Different Values?Eran Belo & Tomislava Savcheva - 2011 - Journal of Multidisciplinary Research 3 (3):143-146.
    Influenced by the story of Gilad Shalit and September 11th victims, this article discusses the everlasting argument of the value of human life in different cultures and from different perspectives. Upon examinations of basic legislations through eye-opening cases of cultural relativism, we raise questions and suggest our own opinion on the unbearable manner in which human life is perceived in the 21st Century.
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  10. The Pan-European Approach in the Fight Against Corruption: The Council of Europe.Raael A. Benitez - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (3):269-280.
    This paper addresses the work of the Council of Europe in the fight against corruption. It presents briefly the Council of Europe’s organisation, activities and priorities and goes on to introduce its work in the fight against corruption. Activities in this field are carried out by the Multidisciplinary Group on Corruption (GMC) which is made up of governmental representatives of the forty Member States of the Organisation and in accordance with a Plan of Action against Corruption. Following work by the (...)
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  11. The Institutional Critique of Effective Altruism.Brian Berkey - forthcoming - Utilitas.
    In recent years, the effective altruism movement has generated much discussion about the ways in which we can most effectively improve the lives of the global poor, and pursue other morally important goals. One of the most common criticisms of the movement is that it has unjustifiably neglected issues related to institutional change that could address the root causes of poverty, and instead focused its attention on encouraging individuals to direct resources to organizations that directly aid people living in poverty. (...)
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  12. No Justice in Climate Policy? Broome Versus Posner, Weisbach, and Gardiner.Alyssa R. Bernstein - 2016 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):172-188.
    The urgent importance of dealing with the climate crisis has led some influential theorists to argue that at least some demands for justice must give way to pragmatic and strategic considerations. These theorists (Cass Sunstein, Eric Posner, and David Weisbach, all academic lawyers, and John Broome, an academic philosopher) contend that the failures of international negotiations and other efforts to change economic policies and practices have shown that moral exhortations are worse than ineffective. Although Broome's position is similar in these (...)
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  13. Witnessing and Organization: Existential Phenomenological Reflections on Intersubjectivity.Janet Borgerson - 2010 - Philosophy Today 54 (1):78-87.
    This article draws in particular on existential-phenomenological notions of “witnessing.” Witnessing, often conceived in the context of testimony, obviously involves epistemological concerns, such as how we come to know through the experiences and reports of others. I shall argue, however, that witnessing as a mode of intersubjectivity offers understandings that involve questions about how people come to be. More specifically, I want to consider the positive potential of “witnessing” to disrupt intersubjective completeness or closure, particularly as this relates to work (...)
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  14. Ashgate Companion to Political Violence.Marie Breen-Smyth (ed.) - forthcoming - Ashgate.
  15. The Legitimacy of Global Governance Institutions.Allen Buchanan & Robert O. Keohane - 2006 - Ethics and International Affairs 20 (4):405–437.
    The authors articulate a global public standard for the normative legitimacy of global governance institutions. This standard can provide the basis for principled criticism of global governance institutions and guide reform efforts in circumstances in which people disagree deeply about the demands of global justice and the role that global governance institutions should play in meeting them.
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  16. Climate Change and the Duties of the Advantaged.Simon Caney - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):203-228.
    Climate change poses grave threats to many people, including the most vulnerable. This prompts the question of who should bear the burden of combating ?dangerous? climate change. Many appeal to the Polluter Pays Principle. I argue that it should play an important role in any adequate analysis of the responsibility to combat climate change, but suggest that it suffers from three limitations and that it needs to be revised. I then consider the Ability to Pay Principle and consider four objections (...)
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  17. Values, Diversity and the Justification of EU Institutions.Emanuela Ceva & Gideon Calder - 2009 - Political Studies 57 (4):828-845.
    Liberal theories of justice typically claim that political institutions should be justifiable to those who live under them – whatever their values. The more such values diverge, the greater the challenge of justifiability. Diversity of this kind becomes especially pronounced when the institutions in question are supra-national. Focusing on the case of the European Union, this paper aims to address a basic question: what kinds of value should inform the justification of political institutions facing a plurality of value systems? One (...)
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  18. The Legitimacy of the Supranational Regulation of Local Systems of Food Production: A Discussion Whose Time Has Come.Emanuela Ceva, Chiara Testino & Federico Zuolo - 2015 - Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (4):418-433.
    By reference to the illustrative case of the supranational regulation of local systems of food production, we aim to show the importance of identifying issues of international legitimacy as a discrete component – alongside issues of global distributive justice – of the liberal project of public justification of supranational collective decisions. Therefore, we offer the diagnosis of a problem but do not prescribe the therapy to cure it.
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  19. Rethinking Realism (or Whatever) and the War on Terrorism in a Place Like the Balkans.Rory J. Conces - 2009 - Theoria: A Journal of Social and Political Theory 56 (120):81-124.
    Political realism remains a powerful theoretical framework for thinking about international relations, including the war on terrorism. For Morgenthau and other realists, foreign policy is a matter of national interest defined in terms of power. Some writers view this tenet as weakening, if not severing, realism's link with morality. I take up the contrary view that morality is embedded in realist thought, as well as the possibility of realism being thinly and thickly moralised depending on the moral psychology of the (...)
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  20. Ethics and Sovereignty.Rory J. Conces - 1996 - International Third World Studies Journal and Review 8:1-11.
  21. Perpetual Strangers: Animals and the Cosmopolitan Right.Stephen Cooke - 2012 - Political Studies.
    In this article I propose a cosmopolitan approach to animal rights based upon Kant's right of universal hospitality. Many approaches to animal rights buttress their arguments by finding similarities between humans and non-human animals; in this way they represent or resemble ethics of partiality. In this article I propose an approach to animal rights that initially rejects similarity approaches and is instead based upon the adoption of a cosmopolitan mindset acknowledging and respecting difference. Furthermore, and in agreement with Martha Nussbaum, (...)
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  22. Perpetual Strangers: Animals and the Cosmopolitan Right.Steve Cooke - 2014 - Political Studies 62 (4):930–944.
    In this article I propose a cosmopolitan approach to animal rights based upon Kant's right of universal hospitality. Many approaches to animal rights buttress their arguments by finding similarities between humans and non-human animals; in this way they represent or resemble ethics of partiality. In this article I propose an approach to animal rights that initially rejects similarity approaches and is instead based upon the adoption of a cosmopolitan mindset acknowledging and respecting difference. Furthermore, and in agreement with Martha Nussbaum, (...)
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  23. Pandemics - Background Paper.Giovanni De Grandis & Jasper Littmann - 2011 - Forward Look Archive.
    The background paper provides an introduction to the concept of pandemics and to the ethical and political issues related with pandemic preparedness.
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  24. When Liberal Peoples Turn Into Outlaw States: John Rawls’Law of Peoplesand Liberal Nuclearism.T. E. Doyle - 2015 - Journal of International Political Theory 11 (2):257-273.
    John Rawls’ account in Law of Peoples of a realist utopia composed of a society of liberal and decent peoples is a stark contrast to his description of “outlaw states,” which seek to undermine the legal and moral frameworks that constitute a pacific global order. Rawls argues that outlaw states cannot conceive of political accommodation with their external enemies; instead, they opt for the rule of force, terror, and brutality. Rawls even urges that liberal peoples are justified in maintaining a (...)
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  25. Reviving Nuclear Ethics: A Renewed Research Agenda for the Twenty-First Century.Thomas E. Doyle - 2010 - Ethics and International Affairs 24 (3):287-308.
    Since the end of the Cold War, international ethicists have focused largely on issues outside the traditional scope of security studies. The nuclear ethics literature needs to be revived and reoriented to address the new and evolving 21st century nuclear threats and policy responses.
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  26. The Recognitive Practices of Declaring and Constituting Statehood.Eva Erman - 2013 - International Theory 5 (1).
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  27. Two Concepts of Sovereignty.David Fagelson - 2001 - International Politics 38 (4):499-514.
  28. Primum Nocere: Medical Brain Drain and the Duty to Stay.Luara Ferracioli & Pablo De Lora - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (5):601-619.
    In this essay, we focus on the moral justification of a highly controversial measure to redress medical brain drain: the duty to stay. We argue that the moral justification for this duty lies primarily in the fact that medical students impose high risks on their fellow citizens while receiving their medical training, which in turn gives them a reciprocity-based reason to temporarily prioritize the medical needs of their fellow citizens.
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  29. Priority-Setting in International Non-Governmental Organizations: It is Not as Easy as ABCD.Lisa L. Fuller - 2012 - Journal of Global Ethics 8 (1):5-17.
    Recently theorists have demonstrated a growing interest in the ethical aspects of resource allocation in international non-governmental humanitarian, development and human rights organizations (INGOs). This article provides an analysis of Thomas Pogge's proposal for how international human rights organizations ought to choose which projects to fund. Pogge's allocation principle states that an INGO should govern its decision making about candidate projects by such rules and procedures as are expected to maximize its long-run cost-effectiveness, defined as the expected aggregate moral value (...)
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  30. A Case of Non-Ideal Guidance: Tackling Tax Competition.Alexandre Gajevic Sayegh - 2016 - Moral Philosophy and Politics:2016-10-04.
    In the global justice literature, growing attention has been given to problems particular to a globalised economy such as tax competition. Political philosophers have started to reflect on how these problems intersect with theories of global justice. This paper explores the idea according to which action-guiding principles of justice can only be formulated at such intersections. This is the starting point from which I develop a ‘non-ideal theory’ of global justice. The methodology of this theory posits that principles of justice (...)
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  31. Book Review 'Catching Capital: The Ethics of Tax Competition'. [REVIEW]Alexandre Gajevic Sayegh - 2016 - Contemporary Political Theory:264.
    In today’s globalised economy, characterised by high capital mobility but largely domestic tax policy, individuals and corporations can pick and choose between different tax regimes. In Catching Capital: The Ethics of Tax Competition, Peter Dietsch offers a commanding analysis covering the moral assessment and an institutional solution to the problem of tax competition. This book will prove useful to political philosophers and legal theorists seeking a thorough approach to global justice that proceeds from real-world practice. And, more importantly, it will (...)
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  32. Il monopolio atomico russo-americano.Ludovico Geymonat - 1967 - Corriere Della Sera (21 marzo 1967).
  33. La Justice Globale, le Multiculturalisme et les Revendications des Immigrants.Pablo Gilabert - 2007 - Philosophiques 34 (1):41-60.
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  34. Philosophy and International Law: Reflections on Interdisciplinary Research Into Terrorism.Anna Goppel & Anne Schwenkenbecher - 2012 - Ancilla Iuris 111.
    This essay investigates the possibilities and limits of interdisciplinary research into terrorism. It is shown that approaches that combine philosophy and international law are necessary, and when such an approach needs to be adopted. However, it is also important not to underestimate how much of a challenge is posed by the absence of agreement concerning the definition of terrorism, and also by the structural differences in the way the two disciplines address the problem and formulate the issues. Not least, the (...)
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  35. Identity and Violence in Contemporary International Politics.E. Harris - 2007 - Filozofia 62:560-562.
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  36. World Poverty and Individual Freedom.Nicole Hassoun - 2008 - American Philosophical Quarterly 45 (2): 191-198.
  37. The Case for the International Governance of Immigration.Javier Hidalgo - 2016 - International Theory 8 (1):140-170.
    States have rights to unilaterally determine their own immigration policies under international law and few international institutions regulate states’ decision-making about immigration. As a result, states have extensive discretion over immigration policy. In this paper, I argue that states should join international migration institutions that would constrain their discretion over immigration. Immigration restrictions are morally risky. When states restrict immigration, they risk unjustly harming foreigners and restricting their freedom. Furthermore, biases and epistemic defects pervasively influence states’ decision-making about immigration policy. (...)
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  38. Import Bans and Tying One's Hands: Weakness of Will as a Justification for Trade Restrictions.Jonathan Kaplan - 2001 - Public Affairs Quarterly 15 (4):355-372.
  39. Protecting the World: Military Humanitarian Intervention and the Ethics of Care.Jess Kyle - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (2):257-273.
    Feminist care theorists Virginia Held and Joan Tronto have suggested that care is relevant to political issues concerning distant others and that care can provide the basis for a more comprehensive moral approach. I consider their approaches with regard to the policy issue of military humanitarian intervention, and raise concerns about exceptionalist attitudes toward international law that entail a collection of costs that I refer to as “the problem of global worldlessness.” I suggest that an ethic of care can overcome (...)
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  40. Who Are Refugees?Matthew Lister - 2013 - Law and Philosophy 32 (5):645-671.
    Hundreds of millions of people around the world are unable to meet their needs on their own, and do not receive adequate protection or support from their home states. These people, if they are to be provided for, need assistance from the international community. If we are to meet our duties to these people, we must have ways of knowing who should be eligible for different forms of relief. One prominent proposal from scholars and activists has been to classify all (...)
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  41. Poverty.Hennie Lotter - 2015 - In Darrel Moellendorf Heather Widdows (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Global Ethics. Routledge.
    A brief overview of the chapter: Its section headings 1. The main champions of the cause of the poor a) Pioneering Peter Singer b) Ground-breaking John Rawls c) Low impact and high frustration for Thomas Pogge… d) …and pointed satisfaction for Sen (and Nussbaum)? 2. Have we made progress in dealing with poverty and global inequality? a) Aid transformed into development cooperation b) How many people are still poor? c) Do we know what poverty is and how it works? 3. (...)
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  42. Wisdom: Object of Study or Basic Aim of Inquiry?,.Nicholas Maxwell - 2012 - In Michel Ferrari & N. Weststrate (eds.), The Scientific Study of Personal Wisdom. Springer.
    We face severe global problems, many that we have inadvertently created ourselves. It is clear that there is an urgent need for more wisdom. One response is to improve knowledge about wisdom. This, I argue, is an inadequate response to the problems we face. Our global problems arise, in part, from a damagingly irrational kind of academic enterprise, devoted as it is to the pursuit of knowledge. We need to bring about a revolution in academic inquiry so that its basic (...)
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  43. The Urgent Need for an Academic Revolution: The Rational Pursuit of Wisdom.Nicholas Maxwell - 2010 - In Charles Tandy (ed.), Death And Anti-Death, Volume 7: Nine Hundred Years After St. Anselm (1033-1109. Ria University Press.
    We are in a state of impending crisis. And the fault lies in part with academia. For two centuries or so, academia has been devoted to the pursuit of knowledge and technological know-how. This has enormously increased our power to act which has, in turn, brought us both all the great benefits of the modern world and the crises we now face. Modern science and technology have made possible modern industry and agriculture, the explosive growth of the world’s population, global (...)
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  44. International Criminal Tribunals: A Normative Defense.Larry May & Shannon Fyfe - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
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  45. The Moral and Political Philosophy of Immigration: Liberty, Security, and Equality.José Jorge Mendoza - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    In this book, José Jorge Mendoza argues that the difficulty with resolving the issue of immigration is primarily a conflict over competing moral and political principles and is thereby, at its core, a problem of philosophy. Using philosophical resources, this book provides some normative guidance to future immigration policy and reform.
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  46. The Political Philosophy of Unauthorized Immigration.José Jorge Mendoza - 2011 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 10 (2):2-6.
    In this article, I broadly sketch out the current philosophical debate over immigration and highlight some of its shortcomings. My contention is that the debate has been too focused on border enforcement and therefore has left untouched one of the more central issue of this debate: what to do with unauthorized immigrants who have already crossed the border and with the “push and pull” factors that have created this situation. After making this point, I turn to the work of Enrique (...)
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  47. Justice and International Integration: The Ethics of Redistribution in the European Union.Ross Howard Miller - 1996 - Dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbara
    Studies of European integration have largely neglected ethical questions which arise in the context of international relations. My dissertation describes for the first time the ethical dimension of western Europe's international political economy by examining the question of international distributive justice in the case of the European Union . Within an analytic framework of contemporary normative political theory, I argue that among three distributive criteria of need, desert and rights, the criterion of need justifies economic redistribution in order to reduce (...)
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  48. Can Foreign Aid Be Used to Promote Good Government in Developing Countries?Mick Moore & Mark Robinson - 1994 - Ethics and International Affairs 8 (1):141–158.
    Since 1990, the allocation of foreign development aid has come to be shaped by donors' concerns about promoting "good government" in developing countries. Yet the aid donors adopt a wide variety of implicit and actual definitions of "good government.".
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  49. A Moral Theory of Political Reconciliation.Colleen Murphy - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Following extended periods of conflict or repression, political reconciliation is indispensable to the establishment or restoration of democratic relationships and critical to the pursuit of peacemaking globally. In this important new book, Colleen Murphy offers an innovative analysis of the moral problems plaguing political relationships under the strain of civil conflict and repression. Focusing on the unique moral damage that attends the deterioration of political relationships, Murphy identifies the precise kinds of repair and transformation that processes of political reconciliation ought (...)
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  50. Assessing Capability Instead of Achieved Functionings in Risk Analysis.Colleen Murphy & Paolo Gardoni - 2010 - Journal of Risk Research 13 (2):137-147.
    A capability approach has been proposed to risk analysis, where risk is conceptualized as the probability that capabilities are reduced. Capabilities refer to the genuine opportunities of individuals to achieve valuable doings and beings, such as being adequately nourished. Such doings and beings are called functionings. A current debate in risk analysis and other fields where a capability approach has been developed concerns whether capabilities or actual achieved functionings should be used. This paper argues that in risk analysis the consequences (...)
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