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  1. The Ethical Work That Regulations Will Not Do.Carusi Annamaria & De Grandis Giovanni - 2012 - Information, Communication and Society 15 (1):124-141.
    Ethical concerns in e-social science are often raised with respect to privacy, confidentiality, anonymity and the ethical and legal requirements that govern research. In this article, the authors focus on ethical aspects of e-research that are not directly related to ethical regulatory framework or requirements. These frameworks are often couched in terms of benefits or harms that can be incurred by participants in the research. The authors shift the focus to the sources of value in terms of which benefits or (...)
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  2. Gordon Graham The Internet://A Philosophical Inquiry.S. G. Arnal - 2001 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (3):311-311.
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  3. Mick or Keith: Blended Identity of Online Rock Fans. [REVIEW]Andrea J. Baker - 2009 - Identity in the Information Society 2 (1):7-21.
    This paper discusses the “blended identity” of online rock fans to show that the standard dichotomy between anonymous and real life personas is an inadequate description of self-presentation in online communities. Using data from an ethnographic, exploratory study of an online community and comparison groups including interviews, an online questionnaire, fan discussion boards, and participant/observation, the research analyzes fan identity online and then offline. Rolling Stones fans often adopt names that illustrate their allegiance to the band, along with avatars. Issues (...)
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  4. Legal Approaches to Regulating Internet Tobacco Sales.Christopher Banthin, Douglas Blanke & John Archard - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (s4):64-68.
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  5. Public Sector Engagement with Online Identity Management.D. Barnard-Wills & D. Ashenden - 2010 - Identity in the Information Society 3 (3):657-674.
    The individual management of online identity, as part of a wider politics of personal information, privacy, and dataveillance, is an area where public policy is developing and where the public sector attempts to intervene. This paper attempts to understand the strategies and methods through which the UK government and public sector is engaging in online identity management. The analysis is framed by the analytics of government and governmentality. This approach draws attention to the wide assemblage of public and private actors (...)
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  6. Ethical Decision Making in a Peer-to-Peer File Sharing Situation: The Role of Moral Absolutes and Social Consensus. [REVIEW]Connie R. Bateman, Sean Valentine & Terri Rittenburg - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):229-240.
    Individuals are downloading copyrighted materials at escalating rates (Hill 2007; Siwek 2007). Since most materials shared within these networks are copyrighted works, providing, exchanging, or downloading files is considered to be piracy and a violation of intellectual property rights (Shang et al. 2008). Previous research indicates that personal moral philosophies rooted in moral absolutism together with social context may impact decision making in ethical dilemmas; however, it is yet unclear which motivations and norms contextually impact moral awareness in a peer-to-peer (...)
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  7. Ethical Considerations in the Conduct of Electronic Surveillance Research.Ashok J. Bharucha, Alex John London, David Barnard, Howard Wactlar, Mary Amanda Dew & Charles F. Reynolds - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (3):611-619.
    The extant clinical literature indicates profound problems in the assessment, monitoring, and documentation of care in long-term care facilities. The lack of adequate resources to accommodate higher staff-to-resident ratios adds additional urgency to the goal of identifying more costeffective mechanisms to provide care oversight. The ever expanding array of electronic monitoring technologies in the clinical research arena demands a conceptual and pragmatic framework for the resolution of ethical tensions inherent in the use of such innovative tools. CareMedia is a project (...)
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  8. Online Security: What's in a Name? [REVIEW]Anat Biletzki - 2013 - Philosophy and Technology 26 (4):397-410.
    This article motions to a real contradiction between online security and civil rights. It traverses semantic and conceptual elaborations of both security and human rights, narrowing their range to national security and human rather than civil rights, and suggests that the concept of security itself, whether online or not, is a rhetorical instrument in the hands of interested parties, mostly states and militaries. This instrument is used to undermine human rights precisely by means of its association and even identification with (...)
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  9. Psychic ID: A Blueprint for a Modern National Identity Scheme.David G. W. Birch - 2008 - Identity in the Information Society 1 (1):189-201.
    The issue of identity cards is hotly debated in many countries, but it often seems to be an oddly backward-looking debate that presumes outdated “Orwellian” architectures. In the modern world, surely we should be debating the requirements for national identity management schemes, in which identity cards may or may not be a useful implementation, before we move on to architecture. If so, then, what should a U.K. national identity management scheme for the 21st century look like? Can we assemble a (...)
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  10. Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don't: The Scientific Community's Responses to Whistleblowing.Stephanic J. Bird & Diane Hoffman-Kim - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (1):3-6.
    The papers in this issue are based on presentations by the authors at the 163nd National Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Seattle, Washington, 13–18 February 1997 in the session entitled Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don’t: What the Scientific Community Can Do about Whistleblowing organized by Stephanie J. Bird and Diane Hoffman-Kim. The papers have been modified following double blind peer review.
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  11. "Open Access," Legal Publishing, and Online Repositories.Pamela Bluh - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):126-130.
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  12. Introduction: Internet Research Ethics at a Critical Juncture.Elizabeth Buchanan - 2006 - Journal of Information Ethics 15 (2):14-17.
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  13. The Internet as Friend or Foe of Intellectual Freedom.Elizabeth Buchanan - 2004 - International Review of Information Ethics 2.
    What a long strange trip the Internet has had. From its inception and use by the American military to the billions of users world-wide who log on daily, the Internet is both the promise of access to information and the peril of surveillance and a means of curtailing intellectual freedom. This paper will review this continuum, paying close attention to recent developments in the United States that fuel the dichotomous debate surrounding intellectual freedom.
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  14. Bytes That Bite: The Internet and Deliberative Democracy.Ian Budge - 1997 - Constellations 4 (2):248-263.
  15. A Disability Response to Surrogate Decision Making in the Internet Age.Teresa Blankmeyer Burke - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):36-37.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 36-37, October 2012.
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  16. Technology and Privacy.Edmund Byrne - 1991 - In The Technology of Discovery and the Discovery of Technology. Blacksburg, VA: Society for Philosophy and Technology. pp. 379-390.
    Emergent technologies are undermining both decisional privacy (intimacy) and informational privacy. Regarding the former consider, e.g., technical intrusions on burglar alarms and telephone calls. Regarding the latter consider how routinely technologies enable intrusion into electronic data processing (EDP) in spite of government efforts to maintain control. These efforts are uneven among nations thus inviting selective choice of a data storage country. Deregulation of telecommunications and assigning operators First Amendment rights invites multiple efforts to profit from preferential treatment of multiple competitors.
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  17. The Two-Tiered Ethics of EDP.Edmund F. Byrne - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (1):53-61.
    Ethical questions regarding access to and use of electronically generated data are (if asked) commonly resolved by distinguishing in Lockean fashion between raw (unworked) and refined (worked) data. The former is thought to belong to no one, the latter to the collector and those to whom the collector grants access. Comparative power separates free riders from rightful owners. The resulting two-tiered ethics of access is here challenged on the grounds that it inequitably establishes a rule of law for the strong (...)
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  18. Review of Interdisciplining Digital Humanities: Boundary Work in an Emerging Field. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2016 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (7 (July)):577-8.
    This review makes a case for scholars putting up their works online and for removing pay-walls of any kind. Therefore, this review is in sync with the stated aims of philpapers.org.
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  19. Costs and Utilities Perspective of Consumers' Intentions to Engage in Online Music Sharing: Consumers' Knowledge Matters.Mei-Fang Chen & Ya-Hui Yen - 2011 - Ethics and Behavior 21 (4):283 - 300.
    Online music sharing, deemed illegal for invading intellectual property rights under current laws, has become a crucial issue for the music industry in the modern digital age, but few have investigated the potential costs and utilities for individuals involved in such online misbehavior. This study aimed to fill in this gap to predict consumers' intentions to engage in online music sharing and further consider consumers' online music sharing knowledge as a moderator in the research model. The results of repeated measures (...)
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  20. The Emerging Relationship of Psychology and the Internet: Proposed Guidelines for Conducting Internet Intervention Research.Craig A. Childress & Joy K. Asamen - 1998 - Ethics and Behavior 8 (1):19 – 35.
    The Internet is rapidly developing into an important medium of communication in modem society, and both psychological research and therapeutic interventions are being increasingly conducted using this new communication medium. As therapeutic interventions using the Internet are becoming more prevalent, it is becoming increasingly important to conduct research on psychotherapeutic Internet interventions to assist in the development of an appropriate standard of practice regarding interventions using this new medium. In this article, we examine the Internet and the current psychological uses (...)
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  21. Ethical Issues of 'Morality Mining': When the Moral Identity of Individuals Becomes a Focus of Data-Mining.Markus Christen, Mark Alfano, Endre Bangerter & Daniel Lapsley - 2013 - In Hakikur Rahman & I. Ramos (eds.), Ethical Data Mining Applications for Socio-Economic Development. IGI Global. pp. 1-21.
  22. Ethics of Science Communication on the Web.M. Clarke - 2009 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 9 (1):9-12.
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  23. An Epistemic Defence of the Blogosphere.David Coady - 2011 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (3):277-294.
    Alvin Goldman claims that the conventional media is in decline as a result of competition from the blogosphere, and that this is a threat to our epistemic wellbeing and, as a result, a threat to good democratic decision-making. He supports this claim with three common complaints about the blogosphere: first, that it is undermining professional journalism, second, that, unlike the conventional media, it lacks ‘balance’, and finally that it is a parasite on the conventional media. I defend the blogosphere against (...)
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  24. Freedom of Expression, Internet Responsibility, and Business Ethics: The Yahoo! Saga and Its Implications. [REVIEW]Raphael Cohen-Almagor - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):353-365.
    In the late 1990s, the Internet seemed a perfect medium for business: a facilitator of unlimited economical propositions to people without any regulatory limitations. Cases such as that of Yahoo! mark the beginning of the end of that illusion. They demonstrate that Internet service providers (ISPs) have to respect domestic state legislation in order to avoid legal risks. Yahoo! was wrong to ignore French national laws and the plea to remove Nazi memorabilia from its auction site. Its legal struggle proved (...)
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  25. Digital Alienation as the Foundation of Online Privacy Concerns.Brandt Dainow - 2015 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (3):109-117.
    The term ‘digital alienation’ is used in critical IS research to refer to manifestations of alienation online. This paper explores the difficulties of using a traditional Marxist analysis to account for digital alienation. The problem is that the activity people undertake online does not look coerced or estranged from the creator’s individuality, both of which are typically seen as necessary for the production of alienation. As a result of this apparent difficulty, much of the research has focused on the relationship (...)
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  26. Key Dialectics in Cloud Services.Brandt Dainow - 2015 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (3):52-59.
    This paper will identify three central dialectics within cloud services. These constitute defining positions regarding the nature of cloud services in terms of privacy, ethical responsibility, technical architecture and economics. These constitute the main frameworks within which ethical discussions of cloud services occur. The first dialectic concerns the question of whether it is it essential that personal privacy be reduced in order to deliver personalised cloud services. I shall evaluate the main arguments in favour of the view that it is. (...)
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  27. What Can a Medieval Friar Teach Us About the Internet? Deriving Criteria of Justice for Cyberlaw From Thomist Natural Law Theory.Brandt Dainow - 2013 - Philosophy and Technology 26 (4):459-476.
    This paper applies a very traditional position within Natural Law Theory to Cyberspace. I shall first justify a Natural Law approach to Cyberspace by exploring the difficulties raised by the Internet to traditional principles of jurisprudence and the difficulties this presents for a Positive Law Theory account of legislation of Cyberspace. This will focus on issues relating to geography. I shall then explicate the paradigm of Natural Law accounts, the Treatise on Law, by Thomas Aquinas. From this account will emerge (...)
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  28. The Impact of the Internet on Our Moral Lives R. J. Cavalier ,The Impact of the Internet on Our Moral Lives, 249 Pp., $26.95/£16.75 Paperback. [REVIEW]Giovanni De Grandis - 2006 - Politics and Ethics Review 2 (2):224-226.
  29. Measuring Openness and Evaluating Digital Academic Publishing Models: Not Quite the Same Business.Giovanni De Grandis & Yrsa Neuman - 2014 - The Journal of Electronic Publishing 17 (3).
    In this article we raise a problem, and we offer two practical contributions to its solution. The problem is that academic communities interested in digital publishing do not have adequate tools to help them in choosing a publishing model that suits their needs. We believe that excessive focus on Open Access (OA) has obscured some important issues; moreover exclusive emphasis on increasing openness has contributed to an agenda and to policies that show clear practical shortcomings. We believe that academic communities (...)
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  30. Innovación y conocimiento libre: cuestiones morales y políticas.Javier De La Cueva González-Cotera - 2013 - Isegoría 48:51-74.
    En el presente trabajo se parte de que la innovación requiere transmisión de información. En la actualidad, el contenido de la transmisión de información se halla sometido a una regulación legal, habitualmente la propiedad intelectual, donde los agentes intervinientes y su requisito de sistema de permisos dificultan la transmisión libre. Para solucionar esta problemática, se están promoviendo dos tipos de soluciones: el primero mediante código legal y el segundo mediante código informático. Estas soluciones, que se fundamentan en razones morales, tienen (...)
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  31. Emerging Roles for Third Parties in Cyberspace.Paul B. de Laat - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 3 (4):267-276.
    In `real' space, third partieshave always been useful to facilitatetransactions. With cyberspace opening up, it isto be expected that intermediation will alsodevelop in a virtual fashion. The articlefocuses upon new cyberroles for third partiesthat seem to announce themselves clearly.First, virtualization of the market place haspaved the way for `cybermediaries', who brokerbetween supply and demand of material andinformational goods. Secondly,cybercommunication has created newuncertainties concerning informational securityand privacy. Also, as in real space,transacting supposes some decency with one'spartners. These needs are being addressed (...)
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  32. Why the Net is Not a Public Sphere.Jodi Dean - 2003 - Constellations 10 (1):95-112.
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  33. Ethics in Practice Correspondents' Reports Canada: Sex on the Internet and Fitness for Judicial Office.Adam Dodek - 2010 - Legal Ethics 13 (2):215.
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  34. Towards a Just and Fair Internet: Applying Rawls’ Principles of Justice to Internet Regulation.David M. Douglas - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (1):57-64.
    I suggest that the social justice issues raised by Internet regulation can be exposed and examined by using a methodology adapted from that described by John Rawls in 'A Theory of Justice'. Rawls' theory uses the hypothetical scenario of people deliberating about the justice of social institutions from the 'original position' as a method of removing bias in decision-making about justice. The original position imposes a 'veil of ignorance' that hides the particular circumstances of individuals from them so that they (...)
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  35. Ethical Aspects of Research in Ultrafast Communication.Alfred Driessen - 2009 - In Paul Sollie & Marcus Düwell (eds.), Evaluating New Technologies: Methodological Problems for the Ethical Assessment of Technology Developments. Springer.
    This chapter summarizes the reflections of a scientist active in optical communication about the need of ethical considerations in technological research. An optimistic definition of ethics, being the art to make good use of technology, is proposed that emphasizes the necessarily involvement of not only technologists but also experts in humanity. The paper then reviews briefly the research activities of a Dutch national consortium where the author had been involved. This mainly academic research dealt with advanced approaches for ultrafast communication. (...)
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  36. Virtual Worlds and Moral Evaluation.Jeff Dunn - 2012 - Ethics and Information Technology 14 (4):255-265.
    Consider the multi-user virtual worlds of online games such as EVE and World of Warcraft, or the multi-user virtual world of Second Life. Suppose a player performs an action in one of these worlds, via his or her virtual character, which would be wrong, if the virtual world were real. What is the moral status of this virtual action? In this paper I consider arguments for and against the Asymmetry Thesis: the thesis that such virtual actions are never wrong. I (...)
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  37. Who Owns My Avatar? -Rights in Virtual Property.Anders Eriksson & Kalle Grill - 2005 - Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views – Worlds in Play.
    This paper presents a framework for discussing issues of ownership in connection to virtual worlds. We explore how divergent interests in virtual property can be mediated by applying a constructivist perspective to the concept ownership. The simple solutions offered today entail that a contract between the game producer and the gamer gives the game developer exclusive rights to all virtual property. This appears to be unsatisfactory. A number of legitimate interests on part of both producers and gamers may be readily (...)
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  38. Trustworthiness and Truth: The Epistemic Pitfalls of Internet Accountability.Karen Frost-Arnold - 2014 - Episteme 11 (1):63-81.
    Since anonymous agents can spread misinformation with impunity, many people advocate for greater accountability for internet speech. This paper provides a veritistic argument that accountability mechanisms can cause significant epistemic problems for internet encyclopedias and social media communities. I show that accountability mechanisms can undermine both the dissemination of true beliefs and the detection of error. Drawing on social psychology and behavioral economics, I suggest alternative mechanisms for increasing the trustworthiness of internet communication.
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  39. A Gift of Fire: Social Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing by Sara Baase. [REVIEW]Joseph S. Fulda - 2000 - Ethics and Information Technology 2 (4):241-247.
    Extremely favorable review, with hardly any criticisms at all.
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  40. Vortex of the Web. Potentials of the Online Environment.Martin A. M. Gansinger & Ayman Kole - 2018 - Hamburg: Anchor.
    This volume compiles international contributions that explore the potential risks and chances coming along with the wide-scale migration of society into digital space. Suggesting a shift of paradigm from Spiral of Silence to Nexus of Noise, the opening chapter provides an overview on systematic approaches and mechanisms of manipulation – ranging from populist political players to Cambridge Analytica. After a discussion of the the juxtaposition effects of social media use on social environments, the efficient instrumentalization of Twitter by Turkish politicans (...)
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  41. Dwelling In the House That Porn Built: A Phenomenological Critique of Pornography In the Age of Internet Technology.Justin L. Harmon - 2012 - Social Philosophy Today 28:115-130.
    This paper is a critique of pornography from within the framework of Heideggerian phenomenology. I contend that pornography is a pernicious form of technological discourse in which women are reduced to spectral and anonymous figures fulfilling a universal role, namely that of sexual subordination. Further, the danger of pornography is covered over in the public sphere as a result of the pervasive appeal to its status as mere fantasy. I argue that relegating the problem to the domain of fantasy is (...)
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  42. Fast, Cheap, and Unethical? The Interplay of Morality and Methodology in Crowdsourced Survey Research.Matthew C. Haug - 2018 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 9 (2):363-379.
    Crowdsourcing is an increasingly popular method for researchers in the social and behavioral sciences, including experimental philosophy, to recruit survey respondents. Crowdsourcing platforms, such as Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, have been seen as a way to produce high quality survey data both quickly and cheaply. However, in the last few years, a number of authors have claimed that the low pay rates on MTurk are morally unacceptable. In this paper, I explore some of the methodological implications for online experimental philosophy research (...)
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  43. Sharing is Caring Vs. Stealing is Wrong: A Moral Argument for Limiting Copyright Protection.Julian Hauser - 2017 - International Journal of Technology Policy and Law 3 (1):68-85.
    Copyright is at the centre of both popular and academic debate. That emotions are running high is hardly surprising – copyright influences who contributes what to culture, how culture is used, and even the kind of persons we are and come to be. Consequentialist, Lockean, and personality interest accounts are generally advanced in the literature to morally justify copyright law. I argue that these approaches fail to ground extensive authorial rights in intellectual creations and that only a small subset of (...)
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  44. A Virtue Epistemology of the Internet: Search Engines, Intellectual Virtues and Education.Richard Heersmink - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (1):1-12.
    This paper applies a virtue epistemology approach to using the Internet, as to improve our information-seeking behaviours. Virtue epistemology focusses on the cognitive character of agents and is less concerned with the nature of truth and epistemic justification as compared to traditional analytic epistemology. Due to this focus on cognitive character and agency, it is a fruitful but underexplored approach to using the Internet in an epistemically desirable way. Thus, the central question in this paper is: How to use the (...)
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  45. Horrorporn/Pornhorror: The Problematic Communities and Contexts of Extreme Online Imagery.Steve Jones - 2010 - In Feona Attwood (ed.), Porn.com: Making Sense of Online Pornography. Peter Lang. pp. 123-137.
    This chapter explores the tentative line between erotic spectacle and horror; a judgement that is problematic given that is based on an axis of moral or ideological normality. The contexts of viewing impact on the status of ‘obscene’ images, both in terms of the communities that view them and their motivation for viewing; for sexual arousal, out of morbid curiosity or malevolence, or perhaps all three simultaneously. The reception of an obscene image is largely based upon the issue of viewer (...)
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  46. Ethical Issues Surrounding Human Participants Research Using the Internet.Heidi E. Keller & Sandra Lee - 2003 - Ethics and Behavior 13 (3):211 – 219.
    The Internet appears to offer psychologists doing research unrestricted access to infinite amounts and types of data. However, the ethical issues surrounding the use of data and data collection methods are challenging research review boards at many institutions. This article illuminates some of the obstacles facing researchers who wish to take advantage of the Internet's flexibility. The applications of the APA ethical codes for conducting research on human participants on the Internet are reviewed. The principle of beneficence, as well as (...)
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  47. Hacking: The Performance of Technology? [REVIEW]Cathy Legg - 2005 - Techne 9 (2):151-154.
    The word “hacker” has an interesting double meaning: one vastly more widespread connotation of technological mischief, even criminality, and an original meaning amongst the tech savvy as a term of highest approbation. Both meanings, however, share the idea that hackers possess a superior ability to manipulate technology according to their will (and, as with God, this superior ability to exercise will is a source of both mystifying admiration and fear). This book mainly concerns itself with the former meaning. To Thomas (...)
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  48. Duncan Langford. Internet Ethics.Michael C. Loui - 2002 - Ethics and Information Technology 4 (2):167-168.
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  49. The Social in the Platform Trap: Why a Microscopic System Focus Limits the Prospect of Social Machines.Markus Luczak-Roesch & Ramine Tinati - 2017 - Discover Society 40.
    “Filter bubble”, “echo chambers”, “information diet” – the metaphors to describe today’s information dynamics on social media platforms are fairly diverse. People use them to describe the impact of the viral spread of fake, biased or purposeless content online, as witnessed during the recent race for the US presidency or the latest outbreak of the Ebola virus (in the latter case a tasteless racist meme was drowning out any meaningful content). This unravels the potential envisioned to arise from emergent activities (...)
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  50. Internet Ethics.Steve Matthews - 2012 - International Encyclopedia of Ethics.
    In the past sixty years computer technology has revolutionized the way information is processed, stored, distributed, and communicated. These changes have greatly affected myriad ways of life including especially the activities of government, commerce and social life broadly construed. This entry will not attempt to cover the broad sweep of ethical issues raised by information and computer technology. It will focus on those questions within computer ethics raised by the Internet.
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