Related categories

77 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 77
  1. The Right of Democracies to Sanction Other Democracies.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    Avia Pasternak argues for a right that democracies have to sanction other democracies. This paper reconstructs her argument and objects to one of its premises.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Peaceful Academic Revolution to Help Humanity Resolve Our Global Crises.Nicholas Maxwell, Ronan Browne & Roger Hallam - manuscript
    The purpose of this document is to outline why and how universities must both transform and mobilise to avert the worst impacts of the global crises faced by humanity. The first section addresses the justification for transformation and how academia can and must transform. In the second section, the document highlights the need for a peaceful mobilisation of student and staff bodies to make effective the transformation advocated for. The document then outlines a blueprint as to action that must be (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. A Role for Coercive Force in the Theory of Global Justice?Endre Begby - forthcoming - In Thom Brooks (ed.), New Waves in Gobal Justice. Palgrave-MacMillan.
  4. Promoting Justice Across Borders.Lucia M. Rafanelli - forthcoming - Political Studies.
    Political theorists have written a great deal about the ethics of “intervention,” defined as states using coercion or force to interfere in foreign societies’ politics. But this work leaves much of global politics un-analyzed—both because non-state actors play an increasingly significant role in it and because its practitioners use many tactics besides force and coercion.We need an ethics of foreign influence to help us navigate the global political arena in all its complexity. Here, I begin to develop a unified theory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Peer Review Report: Ontologies Relevant to Behaviour Change Interventions, Version 3.Robert M. Kelly, David Limbaugh & Barry Smith - 2021 - Human Behaviour Change Project.
    In the present review we focus on what we take to be some remaining issues with the Behaviour Change Intervention Ontology (BCIO). We are in full agreement with the authors’ endorsement of the principles of best practice for ontology development In particular, we agree that an ontology should be “logically consistent and having a clear structures [sic], preferably a well-organised hierarchical structure,” and that “Maximising the new ontology’s interoperability with existing ontologies by reusing entities from existing ontologies where appropriate” is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Revolution and Intervention.Massimo Renzo - 2020 - Noûs 54 (1):533–253.
    Provided that traditional jus ad bellum principles are fulfilled, military humanitarian intervention to stop large scale violations of human rights (such as genocide, crimes against humanity or war crimes) is widely regarded as morally permissible. In cases of “supreme humanitarian emergency”, not only are the victims morally permitted to rebel, but other states are also permitted to militarily intervene. Things are different if the human rights violations in question fall short of supreme humanitarian emergency. Because of the importance of respecting (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Helping Buchanan on Helping the Rebels.Daniel Weltman - 2019 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 15 (1).
    Massimo Renzo has recently argued in this journal that Allen Buchanan’s account of the ethics of intervention is too permissive. Renzo claims that a proper understanding of political self-determination shows that it is often impermissible to intervene in order to establish a regime that leads to more self-determination for a group of people if that group was or would be opposed to the intervention. Renzo’s argument rests on an analogy between individual self-determination and group self-determination, and once we see that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. Bases Teóricas Para El Estudio de Familias Desplazadas.Juan José Flores Flores - 2018 - Cultura 32:261-278.
  9. Features of Psychosocial Intervention in Forming the Professional Ethics of PR-Activity.Mary Golubeva & Irina Ryabets - 2018 - Psychology and Psychosocial Interventions 1:46-49.
    The article considers the question of the role of psychosocial intervention in forming the professional Ethics of PR-specialists. -/- There are three ethical areas (social, corporate, personal) of professional Ethics of PR-activities. The first area of professional Ethics of PR-activities is social. It consists of responsibility of PR-specialist before society. The second area of professional Ethics of PR-activities is corporate. It consists of the responsibility of PRspecialists before the PR profession in general, a PR agency, increasing the reputation of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Humanitarian Intervention and the Problem of Genocide and Atrocity.Jennifer Kling - 2018 - In Andrew Fiala (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 327-346.
    We tend to think that mass atrocities and attempted genocides call for humanitarian intervention by other states. (Nonviolent intervention if possible, military intervention if need be.) In this chapter, I discuss these two related claims in turn. What, if anything, justifies humanitarian intervention in certain states by other states? Ought such interventions, if justified, be pacifist in nature, or is it legitimate in some cases to intervene violently? To discuss these questions, I draw primarily on principles and arguments found in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Political Rioting: A Moral Assessment.Avia Pasternak - 2018 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 46 (4):384-418.
  12. The Moral Equality of Combatants.Barry Christian & Christie Lars - 2017 - In Seth Lazar & Helen Frowe (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethics of War. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The doctrine of the moral equality of combatants holds that combatants on either side of a war have equal moral status, even if one side is fighting a just war while the other is not. This chapter examines arguments that have been offered for and against this doctrine, including the collectivist position famously articulated by Walzer and McMahan’s influential individualist critique. We also explore collectivist positions that have rejected the moral equality doctrine and arguments that some individualists have offered in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Pro Mundo Mori? The Problem of Cosmopolitan Motivation in War.Lior Erez - 2017 - Ethics and International Affairs 31 (2):143-165.
    This article presents a new understanding of the problem of cosmopolitan motivation in war, comparing it to the motivational critique of social justice cosmopolitanism. The problem of cosmopolitanism’s “motivational gap” is best interpreted as a political one, not a meta-ethical or ethical one. That is, the salient issue is not whether an individual soldier is able to be motivated by cosmopolitan concerns, nor is it whether being motivated by cosmopolitanism would be too demanding. Rather, given considerations of legitimacy in the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Who Should Pay for Humanitarian Intervention?Fredrik D. Hjorthen - 2017 - European Journal of Political Theory 19 (3):334-353.
    While some suggestions have been made as to how the duty to undertake humanitarian intervention should be assigned to specific states, the question of how to assign the duty to carry the economic a...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. Two Views of Assistance.Pietro Maffettone & Ryan Muldoon - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (10):998-1021.
    The article makes two substantive contributions to the existing literature on the ethics of international assistance and global justice. First, it builds what we take to be a widely held set of propositions about international assistance into a consistent view, and articulates a strong case against its desirability. Second, it sketches a more attractive alternative. To do so the article uses Sen’s idea of agent-oriented development as a starting point while at the same time providing a generalization of Sen’s account (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Human Rights, Specification and Communities of Inquiry.Yann Allard-Tremblay - 2015 - Global Constitutionalism 4 (2): 254-287.
    This paper offers a revised political conception of human rights informed by legal pluralism and epistemic considerations. In the first part, I present the political conception of human rights. I then argue for four desiderata that such a conception should meet to be functionally applicable. In the rest of the first section and in the second section, I explain how abstract human rights norms and the practice of specification prevent the political conception from meeting these four desiderata. In the last (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Humanitarian Intervention and the Modern State System.Patrick Emerton & Toby Handfield - 2015 - The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and War.
    This chapter argues that, because humanitarian intervention typically involves the military of one state attempting to overthrow another state ’s government, it gives rise to different moral questions from simple cases of interpersonal defensive violence. State sovereignty not only protects institutions within a society that contribute to the satisfaction of individuals’ interests and that cannot be easily restored once overthrown; it also plays a role in the constitution of those interests, which cannot be assumed to be invariant across different forms (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Moralizing Violence?: Social Psychology, Peace Studies, and Just War Theory.Abram Trosky - 2014 - Dissertation, Boston University
    Because the goal of reducing violence is nearly universally accepted, the uniquely prescriptive character of peace and conflict studies is rarely scrutinized. However, prescriptive pacifism in social psychological peace research (SPPR) masks a diversity of opinion on whether nonintervention is more effective in promoting peace than intervention to punish aggression, restore stability, and/or prevent atrocity. SPPR’s skepticism is sharper in the post–9/11 era when states use public fear of terrorist threat to promote sometimes-unrelated domestic and geostrategic interests. The most frequently (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. The Morality of Humanitarian Intervention.Bas van der Vossen - 2014 - In Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher H. Wellman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 404-416.
  20. Rendering Interventionism and Non‐Reductive Physicalism Compatible.Michael Baumgartner - 2013 - Dialectica 67 (1):1-27.
    In recent years, the debate on the problem of causal exclusion has seen an ‘interventionist turn’. Numerous non-reductive physicalists (e.g. Shapiro and Sober 2007) have argued that Woodward's (2003) interventionist theory of causation provides a means to empirically establish the existence of non-reducible mental-to-physical causation. By contrast, Baumgartner (2010) has presented an interventionist exclusion argument showing that interventionism is in fact incompatible with non-reductive physicalism. In response, a number of revised versions of interventionism have been suggested that are compatible with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  21. The Ethics of Revolution and Its Implications for the Ethics of Intervention.Allen Buchanan - 2013 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 41 (4):291-323.
  22. Human Rights and Self-Government in the Age of Cosmopolitan Interventionism.Michael Kocsis - 2013 - Dissertation, Queen's University
    This dissertation explores a family of theoretical models of humanitarian military intervention. A number of recent theorists, including Tesón, Caney, Buchanan, Orend, Moellendorf, and Wheeler, build their models from a perspective called ‘cosmopolitanism.’ They offer arguments based on the moral supremacy of human rights, the arbitrary character of territorial boundaries, and the duty to protect individual human beings exposed to serious and systematic violence by their own governments. I develop a model of intervention that recognizes the moral significance of political (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The Ethics of Preventive War, Deen Chatterjee (Ed.). [REVIEW]Bas van der Vossen - 2013 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  24. The Right Against Interference: Human Rights and Legitimate Authority.Daniel Viehoff - 2013 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 7 (1):25-46.
    Among the functions of state borders is to delineate a domain within which outsiders may normally not interfere. But the human rights practice that has sprung up in recent decades has imposed significant limits on a state’s right against interference. This article considers the connection between human rights on the one hand and justified interference in the internal affairs of states on the other. States, this article argues, have a right against interference if and because they serve their subjects. Interference (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25. Just War Theory.Thom Brooks (ed.) - 2012 - Brill.
    Just War Theory raises some of the most pressing and important philosophical issues of our day. This book brings together some of the most important essays in this area written by leading scholars and offering significant contributions to how we understand just war theory.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. External Intervention and the Politics of State Formation: China, Indonesia, and Thailand, 1893–1952.Ja Ian Chong - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Molding the institutions of governance: theories of state formation and the contingency of sovereignty in fragile polities; 2. Imposing states: foreign rivalries, local collaboration, and state form in peripheral polities; 3. Feudalizing the Chinese polity, 1893-1922: assessing the adequacy of alternative takes on state-reorganization; 4. External influence and China's feudalization, 1893-1922: opportunity costs and patterns of foreign intervention; 5. The evolution of foreign involvement in China, 1923-52: rising opportunity costs and convergent approaches to intervention; 6. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. There is No Human Right to Democracy. But May We Promote It Anyway?Matthew Lister - 2012 - Stanford Journal of International Law 48 (2):257.
    The idea of “promoting democracy” is one that goes in and out of favor. With the advent of the so-called “Arab Spring”, the idea of promoting democracy abroad has come up for discussion once again. Yet an important recent line of thinking about human rights, starting with John Rawls’s book The Law of Peoples, has held that there is no human right to democracy, and that nondemocratic states that respect human rights should be “beyond reproach” in the realm of international (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28. The Dangers of Prejudice Reduction Interventions: Empirical Evidence From Encounters Between Jews and Arabs in Israel.Ifat Maoz - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (6):441-442.
    This commentary focuses on Dixon et al.'s discussion on the dangers of employing prejudice-reduction interventions that seek to promote intergroup harmony in historically unequal societies. Specifically, it illustrates these dangers by discussing my work in Israel on the processes and practices through which reconciliation-aimed encounters between Jews and Arabs mitigate sociopolitical change.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Genocidal Language Games.Lynne Tirrell - 2012 - In Ishani Maitra & Mary Kate McGowan (eds.), Speech and Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech. Oxford University Press. pp. 174--221.
    This chapter examines the role played by derogatory terms (e.g., ‘inyenzi’ or cockroach, ‘inzoka’ or snake) in laying the social groundwork for the genocide of the Tutsi in Rwanda in 1994. The genocide was preceded by an increase in the use of anti-Tutsi derogatory terms among the Hutu. As these linguistic practices evolved, the terms became more openly and directly aimed at Tutsi. Then, during the 100 days of the genocide, derogatory terms and coded euphemisms were used to direct killers (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  30. Developing Normative Consensus: How the ‘International Scene’ Reshapes the Debate Over the Internal and External Criticism of Harmful Social Practices.Ericka Tucker - 2012 - Journal of East-West Thought 2 (1):107-121.
    Can we ever justly critique the norms and practices of another culture? When activists or policy-makers decide that one culture’s traditional practice is harmful and needs to be eradicated, does it matter whether they are members of that culture? Given the history of imperialism, many argue that any critique of another culture’s practices must be internal. Others argue that we can appeal to a universal standard of human wellbeing to determine whether or not a particular practice is legitimate or whether (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Rethinking Remedial Responsibilities.Thom Brooks - 2011 - Ethics and Global Politics 4 (3):195-202.
    How should we determine which nations have a responsibility to remedy suffering elsewhere? The problem is pressing because, following David Miller, ‘[it] is morally intolerable if (remediable) suffering and deprivation are allowed to continue . . . where they exist we are morally bound to hold somebody (some person or collective agent) responsible for relieving them’. Miller offers a connection theory of remedial responsibilities in response to this problem, a theory he has been developing over the last decade. This theory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32. Politics in Trauma Times: Of Subjectivity, War, and Humanitarian Intervention.Maria JoãBo Ferreira & Pedro F. Marcelino - 2011 - Ethics and Global Politics 4 (2):135-145.
    Palace of the End is a dense triptych of monologues exploring alternative narratives - albeit based in real facts - behind the events and the headlines surrounding the war in Iraq. Borrowing its title from the former royal palace where Saddam Hussein’s torture chamber was located, Thompson’s docudrama is structured as a chain of monologues telling three real-life stories set in the context of the war in Iraq. The play conveys three unconventional interpretations of the realities of war: that of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. The Who and the Why of Humanitarian Intervention.Steven Lee - 2011 - Criminal Justice Ethics 30 (3):302-308.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Are Institutions and Empiricism Enough? [REVIEW]Matthew J. Lister - 2011 - Transnational Legal Theory 2 (1).
    Legal philosophers have given relatively little attention to international law in comparison to other topics, and philosophers working on international or global justice have not taken international law as a primary focus, either. Allen Buchanan's recent work is arguably the most important exception to these trends. For over a decade he has devoted significant time and philosophical skill to questions central to international law, and has tied these concerns to related issues of global justice more generally. In what follows I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Two Conceptions of Liberal Global Toleration.Kok-Chor Tan - 2011 - The Monist 94 (4):489-505.
  36. Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: Redefining a Role for “Kind-Hearted Gunmen”.Francis Kofi Abiew - 2010 - Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (2):93-109.
  37. Intervention and Protection in African Crisis Situations: Evolution and Ethical Challenges.Mireille Affa'A. Mindzie - 2010 - Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (2):174-193.
  38. Assessing the African Union's Right of Humanitarian Intervention.Kwame Akonor - 2010 - Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (2):157-173.
  39. Western Technical Civilization and Regional Cultures in Nigeria: The Igbo Experience.Douglas I. O. Anele - 2010 - Cultura 7 (2):38-53.
    This paper examines the impact of the introduction of Western technical civilization on regional cultures in Nigeria, using Igboland in South-EasternNigeria as a test case. It begins with a discussion of some general features of Western technical civilization whose evolution has been profoundly influenced by technological advances in Europe and her cultural colonies in North America and elsewhere. Consequences of the contact between Western technical civilization and traditional Igbo culture are also examined. The paper concludes by discussing the challenging problem (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Rawlsian Compromises in Peacebuilding? Response to Agafonow.Endre Begby - 2010 - Public Reason 2 (2):51-60.
    This paper responds to recent criticism from Alejandro Agafonow. In section I, I argue that the dilemma that Agafonow points to – while real – is in no way unique to liberal peacebuilding. Rather, it arises with respect to any foreign involvement in post-conflict reconstruction. I argue further that Agafonow’s proposal for handling this dilemma suffers from several shortcomings: first, it provides no sense of the magnitude and severity of the “oppressive practices” that peacebuilders should be willing to institutionalize. Second, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  41. South Sudan Independence.Eric Patterson - 2010 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):117-134.
    We investigate how the just cause principle is applicable to contingency planning about armed interventions in civil wars that are somewhat likely to occur in the future. According to a 2005 peace agreement that formally ended a civil war between the Sudanese government in Khartoum and the Sudan People’s Liberation Army, a referendum on South Sudan independence is to be held no later than January 9, 2011. Close observers of Sudan warn that this promise of an independence referendum might not (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Subjectivist Cosmopolitanism and the Morality of Intervention.Edward Song - 2010 - Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (2):137-151.
    While cosmopolitans are right to think that state sovereignty is derived from individuals, many cosmopolitan accounts can be too demanding in their expectations for illiberal regimes because they do not account for the attitudes of the persons with who will subject to the intervention. These ‘objectivist’ accounts suggest that sovereignty is wholly a matter of a state’s conformity to the objective demands of justice. In contrast, for ‘subjectivist’ accounts, the attitudes of citizens do matter. Subjectivist cosmopolitans do not deny the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. James Pattison, Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. Viii 296. Adam D. Reich, Hidden Truth: Young Men Negotiating Lives In and Out of Juvenile Prison. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010. Pp. Xviii 270. [REVIEW]Lynn Stout, Cultivating Conscience & How Good Laws Make Good People - 2010 - Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (3):315.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Enforcing Cosmopolitan Justice: The Problem of Intervention.Kok-Chor Tan - 2010 - In Roland Pierik & Wouter Werner (eds.), Cosmopolitanism in Context. Cambridge University Press.
  45. A Dialogue on International Interventions: When Are They a Right or an Obligation?Daniele Archibugi & David Chandler - 2009 - Ethics and Global Politics 2 (2):155-169.
    Edited by Nieves Zúñiga García-Falces. In 15 years, the international community has been blamed for resorting too easily to the use of force on some occasions (Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo), and also it has been blamed for intervening too late or not at all in other crises (Rwanda, Bosnia and today Sudan and Congo). Even today, one of the most contested questions of international politics is the legitimacy for the use of force. David Chandler, Professor of International Relations at the University (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. In Defense of Discretionary Association Theories of Political Legitimacy: Reply to Buchanan.Marcus Arvan - 2009 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy (2):1-6.
    Allen Buchanan has argued that a widely defended view of the nature of the state – the view that the state is a discretionary association for the mutual advantage of its members – must be rejected because it cannot adequately account for moral requirements of humanitarian intervention. This paper argues that Buchanan’s objection is unsuccessful,and moreover, that discretionary association theories can preserve an important distinction that Buchanan’s alternative approach to political legitimacy cannot: the distinction between “internal” legitimacy (a state’s ability (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Human Security and Liberal Peace.Endre Begby & J. Peter Burgess - 2009 - Public Reason 1 (1):91-104.
    This paper addresses a recent wave of criticisms of liberal peacebuilding operations. We decompose the critics’ argument into two steps, one which offers a diagnosis of what goes wrong when things go wrong in peacebuilding operations, and a second, which argues on the basis of the first step that there is some deep principled flaw in the very idea of liberal peacebuilding. We show that the criticism launched in the argument’s first step is valid and important, but that the second (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  48. When Does Might Make Right? Using Force for Regime Change.John Linarelli - 2009 - Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (3):343-362.
    Should states use force to bring about regime change? International law recognizes no such grounds. This article seeks to provide guidance from moral theory. The aim of this paper is to identify the moral grounds for the use of armed force by one state or a group of states, against another state, when the intention of the intervening states is to achieve a fundamental change in the character of the political and legal institutions of the other state. Lawyers tend to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Sanctioning Liberal Democracies.Avia Pasternak - 2009 - Political Studies 57:54-74.
    This article examines when economic sanctions should be imposed on liberal democracies that violate democratic norms. The argument is made from the social-liberal standpoint, which recognises the moral status of political communities. While social liberals rarely refer to the use of economic sanctions as a pressure tool, by examining why they restrict military intervention and economic aid to cases of massive human rights violations or acute humanitarian need, the article is able to show why they are likely to impose strong (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50. US Military and Covert Action and Global Justice.Sagar Sanyal - 2009 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (2):213-234.
    US military intervention and covert action is a significant contributor to global injustice. Discussion of this contributor to global injustice is relatively common in social justice movements. Yet it has been ignored by the global justice literature in political philosophy. This paper aims to fill this gap by introducing the topic into the global justice debate. While the global justice debate has focused on inter-national and supra-national institutions, I argue that an adequate analysis of US military and covert action must (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 77