This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

62 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 62
  1. The Invisible Hand in Economics: How Economists Explain Unintended Social Consequences , N. Emrah Aydinonat, Routledge, 2008, XVI + 258 Pages. [REVIEW]Anna Alexandrova - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (3):371-378.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Beyond the Invisible Hand: Groundwork for a New Economics. By Kaushik Basu.Wladimir Andreff - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (1):88-89.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Social Norms, The Invisible Hand, and the Law.Jonny Anomaly & Geoffrey Brennan - 2014 - University of Queensland Law Journal 33 (2).
  4. Is Spontaneous Order a Value-Free Descriptive Methodological Tool?N. Emrah Aydinonat - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (4):448-452.
    Review of Adam Smith’s political philosophy: the invisible hand and spontaneous order, by Craig Smith, London: Routledge, 2006, i –vi þ 209 pp., US$147.29 (hardback), ISBN 978-0-415-36094-4.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Invisible Hand in Economics: How Economists Explain Unintended Social Consequences.N. Emrah Aydinonat - 2008 - Routledge.
    Introduction -- Unintended consequences -- The origin of money -- Segregation -- The invisible hand -- The origin of money reconsidered -- Models and representation -- Game theory and conventions -- Conclusion.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  6. 12 Invisible, Dispersed and Connected.Ruth Barcan - 2013 - In Geoffrey Samuel & Jay Johnston (eds.), Religion and the Subtle Body in Asia and the West: Between Mind and Body. Routledge. pp. 8--224.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Beyond the Invisible Hand: Groundwork for a New Economics.Kaushik Basu - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    One of the central tenets of mainstream economics is Adam Smith's proposition that, given certain conditions, self-interested behavior by individuals leads them to the social good, almost as if orchestrated by an invisible hand. This deep insight has, over the past two centuries, been taken out of context, contorted, and used as the cornerstone of free-market orthodoxy. In Beyond the Invisible Hand, Kaushik Basu argues that mainstream economics and its conservative popularizers have misrepresented Smith's insight and hampered our understanding of (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Oxford Handbook of Adam Smith.Christopher J. Berry, Maria Pia Paganelli & Craig Smith (eds.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Preface Introduction Christopher J. Berry: Adam Smith: Outline of Life, Times, and Legacy Part One: Adam Smith: Heritage and Contemporaries 1: Nicholas Phillipson: Adam Smith: A Biographer's Reflections 2: Leonidas Montes: Newtonianism and Adam Smith 3: Dennis C. Rasmussen: Adam Smith and Rousseau: Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment 4: Christopher J. Berry: Adam Smith and Early Modern Thought Part Two: Adam Smith on Language, Art and Culture 5: Catherine Labio: Adam Smith's Aesthetics 6: James Chandler: Adam Smith as Critic 7: Michael C. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Review of Emrah Aydinonat’s The Invisible Hand in Economics: How Economists Explain Unintended Social Consequences. [REVIEW]Mark Blaug - 2009 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 2 (1):123-124.
  10. Risk Management and the Responsible Corporation: How Sweeping the Invisible Hand?John R. Boatright - 2011 - Business and Society Review 116 (1):145-170.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. Displaying the Invisible: Volkskrankheiten on Exhibition in Imperial Germany.C. Brecht & S. Nikolow - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 31 (4):511-530.
  12. Hands Invisible and Intangible.Geoffrey Brennan & Philip Pettit - 1993 - Synthese 94 (2):191 - 225.
    The notion of a spontaneous social order, an order in human affairs which operates without the intervention of any directly ordering mind, has a natural fascination for social and political theorists. This paper provides a taxonomy under which there are two broadly contrasting sorts of spontaneous social order. One is the familiar invisible hand; the other is an arrangement that we describe as the intangible hand. The paper is designed to serve two main purposes. First, to provide a pure account (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  13. Invisible Hand Strikes Back, The.Roy Childs Jr - 1977 - Journal of Libertarian Studies 1 (1):23-33.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. The Nearly Invisible Invisible Hand.Rex Cottle & Myles Wallace - 1981 - Journal of Libertarian Studies 5 (3):341-343.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Perks, Pilferage, and the Fiddle: The Historical Structure of Invisible Wages. [REVIEW]Jason Ditton - 1977 - Theory and Society 4 (1):39-71.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. The Phenomenology of Economics: Life-World, Formalism, and the Invisible Hand.Till Düppe - 2010 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 3 (1):132-135.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. The Invisible Hand and the Cunning of Reason.Ullmann-Margalit Edna - 1997 - Social Research 58:429-454.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. The Invisible Hand: What Do We Know?Brigitte Falkenburg - 2008 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 96 (1):207-224.
    Adam Smith's metaphor of the "invisible hand" and its analogue in classical physics are investigated in detail. Smith's analogue was the mechanics of the solar system. What makes the analogy fail are not the idealisations in the caricature-like model of the rational economic man . The main problem rather is that the metaphor does not employ the correct analogue, which belongs to thermodynamics and statistics. In the simplest macro-economic model, the business cycle has the same formal structure as the heat (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. La Réunion Invisible.Michel Gheude - 1994 - Hermes 13:275.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. The Invisible Hand in Medical Education.S. Gilbert - forthcoming - Bioethics Forum.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. The Hesitant Hand. Taming Self-Interest in the History of Economic Ideas.Nicola Giocoli - 2012 - Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (4):451-457.
    Journal of Economic Methodology, Volume 19, Issue 4, Page 451-457, December 2012.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Bringing Forth That Which is Within: How an Invisible Hand Led Me to a Life That “Feels Like My Own”.S. J. Goerner - 2013 - World Futures 69 (4-6):345 - 358.
    (2013). Bringing Forth That Which is Within: How an Invisible Hand Led me to a Life That “Feels Like My Own”. World Futures: Vol. 69, The Complexity of Life and Lives of Complexity, pp. 345-358.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The Soul of Modern Economic Man: Ideas of Self Interest, Thomas Hobbes to Adam Smith, Milton L. Myers, Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1983, 157 Pages. [REVIEW]Scott Gordon - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (1):139.
  24. The Invisible Hand: Economic Equilibrium in the History of Science. [REVIEW]I. Grattan-Guinness - 1991 - British Journal for the History of Science 24 (4):484-485.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Book Review:The Invisible Hand Bruna Ingrao, Giorgio Israel. [REVIEW]Edward J. Green - 1993 - Philosophy of Science 60 (2):362-.
  26. Carl Menger's Theory of Invisible-Hand Explanations.M. Haller - 2000 - Social Science Information 39 (4):529-565.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27. SUPPORT and the Invisible Family.John Hardwig - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (6):23-25.
  28. Invisible People Suffer Most.Guy Harrison - 2005 - Free Inquiry 26:23-23.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Explanation and diagnosis in economics.Daniel Hausman - 2001 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 3:311-326.
  30. What's Wrong with Invisible-Hand Explanations?David L. Hull - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (4):126.
    An invisible hand seems to play an important role in science. In this paper I set out the general structure of invisible-hand explanations, counter some objections that have been raised to them, and detail the role that they play in science. The most important issue is the character of the mechanisms that are supposed to bring about invisible-hand effects.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  31. Shaking an Invisible Hand.Carlo Jaeger - 2012 - Complexity Economics 1 (1):91-103.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. The Invisible Children.Maureen Kelley - 2012 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 2 (2):E4-E6.
  33. Wie Erklärt Man MIT Unsichtbaren Händen? / How Can Invisible Hands Explain?Ulrich J. Kuehne - unknown
    How Can Invisible Hands Explain?The article presents a survey of what is meant in the social sciences by an "invisible hand explanation", dealing in special with the ideas of Bernard Mandeville, Adam Smith, Carl Menger, Friedrich August von Hayek, Robert Nozick and Edna Ullmann-Margalit, and evaluates whether these explanations meet the standards of sound scientific arguments. The answer is affirmative with two different kinds of invisible hand explanations (IHE), the "causal-mechanical"-IHE and the "functional-evolutionary"-IHE.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Wie Erklärt Man MIT Unsichtbaren Händen? / How Can Invisible Hands Explain?Ulrich J. Kuehne - unknown
    The article presents a survey of what is meant in the social sciences by an "invisible hand explanation", dealing in special with the ideas of Bernard Mandeville, Adam Smith, Carl Menger, Friedrich August von Hayek, Robert Nozick and Edna Ullmann-Margalit, and evaluates whether these explanations meet the standards of sound scientific arguments. The answer is affirmative with two different kinds of invisible hand explanations (IHE), the "causal-mechanical"-IHE and the "functional-evolutionary"-IHE.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Reviving the Invisible Hand: The Case for Classical Liberalism in the Twenty-First Century.Deepak Lal - 2008 - Princeton University Press.
    Reviving the Invisible Hand is an uncompromising call for a global return to a classical liberal economic order, free of interference from governments and international organizations. Arguing for a revival of the invisible hand of free international trade and global capital, eminent economist Deepak Lal vigorously defends the view that statist attempts to ameliorate the impact of markets threaten global economic progress and stability. And in an unusual move, he not only defends globalization economically, but also answers the cultural and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Intentions in Invisible-Hand Accounts.Aki Lehtinen - 2009 - Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (4):409-416.
    N. Emrah Aydinonat's account of the invisible-hand is analysed. One of the conditions for unintended social consequences is it requires that individuals' intentions are exclusively directed at the individual level. This condition is weakened in order to accommodate cases in which individuals may also aim at consequences at the social level but the model clearly depicts the invisible hand. Lehtinen's model of counterbalancing strategic votes is proposed as an example that satisfies Aydinonat's conditions, if they are modified as suggested.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. The Invisible Hand, Economic Equilibrium in the History of Science, Bruna Ingrao and Giorgio Israel. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1991, 491 Pages. [REVIEW]Robert J. Leonard - 1993 - Economics and Philosophy 9 (1):178.
  38. Reflection on Rules in Science: An Invisible-Hand Perspective.Thomas C. Leonard - 2002 - Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (2):141-168.
    Can successful science accommodate a realistic view of scientific motivation? The Received View in theory of science has a theory of scientific success but no theory of scientific motivation. Critical Science Studies has a theory of scientific motivation but denies any prospect for (epistemologically meaningful) scientific success. Neither can answer the question because both regard the question as immaterial. Arguing from the premise that an adequate theory of science needs both a theory of scientific motivation, and a theory of scientific (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. The Failure of Nozick's Invisible-Hand Justification of the Political State.Douglas Lind - 1989 - Auslegung 15 (1):57-68.
  40. Mao's Invisible Hand: The Political Foundations of Adaptive Governance in China.P. Link - 2014 - Common Knowledge 20 (1):138-139.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Invisible Hand Arguments: Milton Friedman and Adam Smith.Alistair M. Macleod - 2007 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 5 (2):103-117.
    The version of the invisible hand argument in Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments differs in important respects from the version in The Wealth of Nations. Both are different, in turn, from the version invoked by Milton Friedman in Free to Choose. However, all three have a common structure. Attention to this structure can help sharpen our sense of their essential thrust by highlighting the questions (about the nature of economic motivation, the structure of markets, and conceptions of the public (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Morality and the Invisible Hand.Christopher McMahon - 1981 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 10 (3):247-277.
  43. The Invisible Hand? Wittgenstein and Judaism.John Milfull - 2006 - The European Legacy 11 (5):555-556.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. On the Emergence of Descriptive Norms.Ryan Muldoon, Chiara Lisciandra, Cristina Bicchieri, Stephan Hartmann & Jan Sprenger - 2014 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 13 (1):3-22.
    A descriptive norm is a behavioral rule that individuals follow when their empirical expectations of others following the same rule are met. We aim to provide an account of the emergence of descriptive norms by first looking at a simple case, that of the standing ovation. We examine the structure of a standing ovation, and show it can be generalized to describe the emergence of a wide range of descriptive norms.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  45. Robots and Us: Towards an Economics of the ‘Good Life’.C. W. M. Naastepad & Jesse M. Mulder - 2018 - Review of Social Economy:1-33.
    (Expected) adverse effects of the ‘ICT Revolution’ on work and opportunities for individuals to use and develop their capacities give a new impetus to the debate on the societal implications of technology and raise questions regarding the ‘responsibility’ of research and innovation (RRI) and the possibility of achieving ‘inclusive and sustainable society’. However, missing in this debate is an examination of a possible conflict between the quest for ‘inclusive and sustainable society’ and conventional economic principles guiding capital allocation (including the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Die “Invisible Hand” der Moral.”.A. Nassehi - 1994 - Ethik Und Sozialwissenschaften 5 (1):53-55.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Erasing the Invisible Hand: Essays on an Elusive and Misused Concept in Economics.Warren J. Samuels - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines the use, principally in economics, of the concept of the invisible hand, centering on Adam Smith. It interprets the concept as ideology, knowledge, and a linguistic phenomenon. It shows how the principal Chicago School interpretation misperceives and distorts what Smith believed on the economic role of government. The essays further show how Smith was silent as to his intended meaning, using the term to set minds at rest; how the claim that the invisible hand is the foundational (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Is Any Economic System Unjust?Charles Sayward - 1989 - Southwest Philosophy Review 5 (2):17-23.
    The morality of an economic system characterized as an Adam Smith type system is compared with one characterized by central planning. A prima facie case is made that, while the latter has attributes that satisfy a necessary condition for having moral attributes, the former does not and, as a result, has no moral attributes. But then a deeper look at the situation reveals that the directed systems really do not satisfy the necessary condition either. Both the directed and undirected systems (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Hayek's Epistemic Theory of Industrial Fluctuations.Scott Scheall - manuscript
    F.A. Hayek essentially quit economic theory and gave up the phenomena of industrial fluctuations as an explicit object of theoretical investigation following the publication of his last work in technical economics, 1941’s The Pure Theory of Capital. Nonetheless, several of Hayek’s more methodologically-oriented writings bear important implications for economic phenomena, especially those of industrial fluctuations. Decisions (usually, for Hayek, of a political nature) taken on the basis of a “pretence” of knowledge impede the operation of the price system’s belief-coordinating function (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Chapter 11’s Invisible Men.Arthur Sharplin - 1988 - International Journal of Value-Based Management 1 (2):1-18.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 62