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  1. added 2019-10-01
    Making Carbon Fee Just Steep Enough to Meet Emission Reduction Targets.P. Olcott - manuscript
    One of the ways that we could account for the unpredictability of the price elasticity of demand for carbon would be to provide a fail-safe mechanism to ensure that we definitely stay on the carbon reduction schedule. If we kept Energy Innovation Act (HR 763) essentially as it is and scale up the annual carbon fee increase by Number-of-Years-Behind-Schedule * 0.15.
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  2. added 2019-07-25
    In Pursuit of the Rarest of Birds: An Interview with Gilbert Faccarello.Gilbert Faccarello, Joost Hengstmengel & Thomas R. Wells - 2014 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 7 (1):86-108.
    GILBERT JEAN FACCARELLO (Paris, 1950) is professor of economics at Université Panthéon-Assas, Paris, and a member of the Triangle research centre (École Normale Supérieure de Lyon and CNRS). He is presently chair of the ESHET Council (European Society for the History of Economic Thought). He completed his doctoral research in economics at Université de Paris X Nanterre. He has previously taught at the Université de Paris-Dauphine, Université du Maine and École Normale Supérieure de Fontenay/Saint-Cloud (now École Normale Supérieure de Lyon). (...)
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  3. added 2019-06-17
    Money and Mental Contents.Sarah Vooys & David G. Dick - forthcoming - Synthese:1-16.
    It can be hard to see where money fits in the world. Money seems both real and imaginary, since it has obvious causal powers, but is also, just as obviously, something humans have just made up. Recent philosophical accounts of money have declared it to be real, but for very different reasons. John Searle and Francesco Guala disagree over whether money is just whatever acts like money, or just whatever people believe to be money. In developing their accounts of institutions (...)
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  4. added 2019-06-07
    Equilibrium and Disequilibrium in Economic Theory: A Confrontation of the Classical, Marshallian and Walras-Hicksian Conceptions: Michel De Vroey.Michel De Vroey - 1999 - Economics and Philosophy 15 (2):161-185.
    When the economic theory of the last decades becomes a subject of reflection for historians of economic theory, a striking feature which they will have to explain is the demise of the disequilibrium concept. Previously, economists had no qualms concerning the view that the market or the economy was exhibiting disequilibria. Amongst many possible quotations, the following, drawn from Viner's well-known article on Marshall, illustrates that.
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  5. added 2019-06-06
    Exchanges and Relationships: On Hard-Headed Economics Capturing the Soft Side of Life.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2012 - Social Theory and Practice 38 (2):231-257.
    Many social scientists think of exchange in terms far broader than philosophers. I defend the broader use of the term as well as the claim that meaningful human relationships are usefully understood as constituted by exchanges. I argue, though, that we must recognize that a great number of non-monetary and non-material goods are part of our daily lives and exchanges. Particularly important are emotional goods. I defend my view against the important objection that it demeans intimate relationships. As an addendum, (...)
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  6. added 2019-06-06
    Review of C. Mantzavinos (Ed.) 2009. Philosophy of the Social Sciences: Philosophical Theory and Scientific Practice.Michiru Nagatsu - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (1):75-83.
  7. added 2019-06-06
    Review of Representation and Structure in Economics. The Methodology of Econometric Models of the Consumption Function. [REVIEW]Federica Russo - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (1):114-118.
  8. added 2019-06-06
    Kuhn's Paradigms and Neoclassical Economics: Reply to Dow: George Argyrous.George Argyrous - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (1):123-126.
  9. added 2019-06-06
    Kuhn's Paradigms and Neoclassical Economics: A Comment: Sheila C. Dow.Sheila C. Dow - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (1):119-122.
  10. added 2019-06-06
    Lakatosian Perspectives on General Equilibrium Analysis: A REPLY: Andrea Salanti.Andrea Salanti - 1993 - Economics and Philosophy 9 (2):283-287.
  11. added 2019-06-06
    Austrians and Post Keynesians on Economic Reality: Rejoinder to Critics.Paul Davidson - 1993 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 7 (2-3):423-444.
    Most economists—old and new classical, old and new Keynesian, and Austrian postulate an immutable reality unchangeable by any human action. They differ only over the amount of information decisionmakers have, in the short run, about this unchanging reality. Keynes and the Post Keynesians provide an axiomatic alternative model that presumes a transmutable economic reality. Runde, Torr, Prychitko, and Boehm and Farmer fail to adequately address this dichotomous analysis of reality in responding to my review of O'Driscoll and Rizzo's book.
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  12. added 2019-06-06
    Economics and the Philosophy of Science.Deborah A. Redman - 1991 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Economists and other social scientists in this century have often supported economic arguments by referring to positions taken by philosophers of science. This important new book looks at the reliability of this practice and, in the process, provides economists, social scientists, and historians with the necessary background to discuss methodological matters with authority. Redman first presents an accurate, critical, yet neutral survey of the modern philosophy of science from the Vienna Circle to the present, focusing particularly on logical positivism, sociological (...)
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  13. added 2019-06-06
    Economics and Hermeneutics: Lawrence A. Bercer.Lawrence A. Berger - 1989 - Economics and Philosophy 5 (2):209-234.
    In a recent article in this journal, D. Wade Hands reviewed Charles Taylor's two-volume work, Philosophical Papers. Hands predicts that Taylor's work will have no impact on the philosophy of economics. This may indeed turn out to be the case; but if so, it will only be because the profession is not listening. Of course, it is typical of the profession to be more interested in exporting its product than in learning from other disciplines. This is exemplified in Hands's use (...)
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  14. added 2019-06-06
    Keynes's Changing Conception of Probability: Bradley W. Bateman.Bradley W. Bateman - 1987 - Economics and Philosophy 3 (1):97-119.
    One of the most actively discussed aspects of Keynes's thought during the last decade has been his concern with uncertainty and probability theory. As the concerns of current macroeconomic theorists have turned increasingly to the effects of expectations and uncertainty, interest has grown in the fact that Keynes was the author of A Treatise on Probability and that uncertainty plays a prominent role in Chapter 12 of The General Theory as well as in three 1937 papers in which he summarized (...)
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  15. added 2019-06-05
    On the Relations Between Philosophy and Economics: Part II: To What Kind of Philosophical Problems Should Economists Address Themselves?Terence W. Hutchison - 1997 - Journal of Economic Methodology 4 (1):127-151.
  16. added 2019-03-07
    Les risques majeurs et l'action publique.Céline Grislain-Letremy, Reza Lahidji & Philippe Mongin - 2012 - Paris: La Documentation Française.
    Par risques majeurs, on entend ceux qui s’attachent à des événements dont les conséquences défavorables, pour l’humanité ou pour l’environnement, sont d’une gravité exceptionnelle. On n’ajoutera ni que ces événements sont d’une intensité physique extrême, ni qu’ils surviennent rarement, car ce n’est pas toujours le cas. Seuls des risques majeurs de nature civile seront considérés dans cet ouvrage, et il s'agira, plus limitativement, de risques naturels, comme ceux d’inondation et de submersion marine, illustrés par la tempête Xynthia en 2010, de (...)
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  17. added 2019-01-09
    Extrapolation of Causal Effects – Hopes, Assumptions, and the Extrapolator’s Circle.Donal Khosrowi - 2019 - Journal of Economic Methodology 26 (1):45-58.
    I consider recent strategies proposed by econometricians for extrapolating causal effects from experimental to target populations. I argue that these strategies fall prey to the extrapolator’s circle: they require so much knowledge about the target population that the causal effects to be extrapolated can be identified from information about the target alone. I then consider comparative process tracing as a potential remedy. Although specifically designed to evade the extrapolator’s circle, I argue that CPT is unlikely to facilitate extrapolation in typical (...)
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  18. added 2019-01-09
    Ekonomia altruizmu – o racjonalności zachowań prospołecznych.Magdalena Adamus - 2018 - Diametros 57:1-22.
    This paper presents considerations on altruism and prosocial behaviour formulated on the basis of some experiments with the ultimatum game. In the first part it will discuss relations between expected utility theories, the characteristics of homo oeconomicus and a modern understanding of altruism. It will focus in particular on conceptual differences, indicating that we can find more than one definition of altruism in modern literature. The second part of the text will provide an overview of selected behavioural theories of prosocial (...)
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  19. added 2018-02-17
    The Economics of Freedom: Theory, Measurement, and Policy Implications.Sebastiano Bavetta & Pietro Navarra - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    What is freedom? Can we measure it? Does it affect policy? This book develops an original measure of freedom called 'Autonomy Freedom', consistent with J. S. Mill's view of autonomy, and applies it to issues in policy and political design. The work pursues three aims. First, it extends classical liberalism beyond exclusive reliance on negative freedom so as to take autonomous behavior explicitly into account. Second, it grounds on firm conceptual foundations a new standard in the measurement of freedom that (...)
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  20. added 2018-01-12
    Economics Made Fun: Philosophy of the Pop-Economics.N. Aydinonat & Jack Vromen (eds.) - 2015 - London: Routledge.
  21. added 2017-11-22
    Gambling with Death.H. Orri Stefánsson - forthcoming - Topoi:1-11.
    Orthodox expected utility theory imposes too stringent restrictions on what attitudes to risk one can rationally hold. Focusing on a life-and-death gamble, I identify as the main culprit the theory’s Linearity property, according to which the utility of a particular change in the risk of a bad outcome is independent of the original level of risk. Finally, I argue that a recent non-standard Bayesian decision theory, that does not have this property, handles risky gambles better than the orthodox theory.
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  22. added 2017-10-25
    Dialectics and the Austrian School? The Search for Common Ground in the Methodology of Heterodox Economics.Andy Denis - 2008 - Journal of Philosophical Economics 1 (2):151-173.
    In a recent paper (Denis, 2004b) I argued that the neoclassical use of the concept of equilibrium was guilty of a hypostatisation: an equilibrium which is only an abstraction and extrapolation, the logical terminus of a component process taken in isolation, is extracted and one-sidedly substituted for the whole. The temporary is made permanent, and process subordinated to stasis, with clearly apologetic results. I concluded by suggesting that this hypostatisation exemplified the contrast between formal and dialectical modes of thought, and (...)
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  23. added 2017-07-04
    Openness to Argument: A Philosophical Examination of Marxism and Freudianism.Ray Scott Percival - 1992 - Dissertation, London School of Economics
    No evangelistic erroneous network of ideas can guarantee the satisfaction of these two demands : (1) propagate the network without revision and (2) completely insulate itself against losses in credibility and adherents through criticism. If a network of ideas is false, or inconsistent or fails to solve its intended problem, or unfeasible, or is too costly in terms of necessarily forsaken goals, its acceptability may be undermined given only true assumptions and valid arguments. People prefer to adopt ideologies that (i) (...)
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  24. added 2017-03-16
    Revisiting Friedman’s F53: Popper, Knight, and Weber.Hoyningen-Huene Paul - manuscript
    Neither Karl Popper, nor Frank Knight, nor Max Weber are cited or mentioned in Friedman’s famous 1953 essay “On the methodology of positive economics” (F53). However, they play a crucial role in F53. Making their con-tribution explicit suggests that F53 has been seriously misread in the past. I will first show that there are several irritating statements in F53 that are, taken together, not compatible with any of the usual readings of F53. Sec-ond, I show that an alternative reading of (...)
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  25. added 2017-03-03
    Economic Ontology: What? Why? How?Uskali Maki - 2001 - In Uskali Mäki (ed.), The Economic World View: Studies in the Ontology of Economics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 1.
    So you're an economist? You study everything that can be gauged by the measure rod of money? You view human interaction in terms of supply and demand in the market? You depict human action as seeking self-interest in a calculative manner? Is this indeed your view of the world? If you are an economist and somebody has attempted, or might attempt, to embarrass you with such questions, you should read this book. If you are a non-economist inclined to raise such (...)
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  26. added 2017-02-13
    Acceptable Risk.Cory Wimberly - 2015 - In The SAGE Encyclopedia of Economics and Society. SAGE.
    Perhaps the topic of acceptable risk never had a sexier and more succinct introduction than the one Edward Norton, playing an automobile company executive, gave it in Fight Club: “Take the number of vehicles in the field (A), multiply it by the probable rate of failure (B), and multiply the result by the average out of court settlement (C). A*B*C=X. If X is less than the cost of the recall, we don’t do one.” Of course, this dystopic scene also gets (...)
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  27. added 2017-02-09
    Some Comments on Velikovsky's Methodology.M. W. Friedlander - 1974 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1974:477 - 486.
  28. added 2017-02-07
    The Project of a Personalistic Economics.Luk Bouckaert - 1999 - Ethical Perspectives 6 (1):20-33.
    One cannot really speak of a school of personalistic economists. Moreover, there is a wide gulf between the economic philosophy of the personalists and the mathematical context of economic science. Since the thirties, philosophers such as Alexandre Marc, Jacques Maritain, Emmanuel Mounier and many others have been searching, on the basis of a personalistic view of man, for a `third way' between individualistic capitalism and statist socialism , but there was seldom interest from the side of the scientific economists.Fortunately, there (...)
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  29. added 2017-02-02
    Philosophy of Economics: Proceedings, Munich, July 1981.Wolfgang Stegmüller, Wolfgang Balzer & Wolfgang Spohn (eds.) - 1982 - Springer Verlag.
  30. added 2016-12-12
    The Economic World View: Studies in the Ontology of Economics.Uskali Mäki (ed.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    The beliefs of economists are not solely determined by empirical evidence in direct relation to the theories and models they hold. Economists hold 'ontological presuppositions', fundamental ideas about the nature of being which direct their thinking about economic behaviour. In this volume, leading philosophers and economists examine these hidden presuppositions, searching for a 'world view' of economics. What properties are attributed to human individuals in economic theories, and which are excluded? Does economic man exist? Do markets have an essence? Do (...)
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  31. added 2016-12-08
    On the Structure of Explanatory Unification: The Case of Geographical Economics.Uskali Mäki & Caterina Marchionni - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):185-195.
    A newly emerged field within economics, known as geographical economics claims to have provided a unified approach to the study of spatial agglomerations at different spatial scales by showing how these can be traced back to the same basic economic mechanisms. We analyze this contemporary episode of explanatory unification in relation to major philosophical accounts of unification. In particular, we examine the role of argument patterns in unifying derivations, the role of ontological convictions and mathematical structures in shaping unification, the (...)
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  32. added 2016-12-08
    Explanatory Unification: Double and Doubtful.U. Maki - 2001 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (4):488-506.
    Explanatory unification—the urge to “explain much by little”—serves as an ideal of theorizing not only in natural sciences but also in the social sciences, most notably in economics. The ideal is occasionally challenged by appealing to the complexity and diversity of social systems and processes in space and time. This article proposes to accommodate such doubts by making a distinction between two kinds of unification and suggesting that while such doubts may be justified in regard to mere derivational unification (which (...)
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  33. added 2016-06-05
    Liberal Individualism and Reforms.Ihor Karivets' - 2016 - In Mykola Bunyk Antonina Kolodii (ed.), Liberalism,Postcommunism and Reforms. Ludwig von Mises and Contemporary Societies Studies. A Collection of Research Papers. pp. 160-167.
    In this article the author considers the essential connection between liberal individualism, reforms and initiativeness. The author shows that liberal individualism has nothing in common with robinsonade, egoism and narrow view upon the things. On the contrary, it sets free the initiativeness of people and makes them active in social, economic and civil spheres. Consequently, if Ukrainians want the decentralization in all the spheres of life, then it is necessarily to realize the ideas of classical liberalism: liberty, equality and justice. (...)
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  34. added 2015-08-27
    WHITE, Morton: Foundations of Historical Knowledge. [REVIEW]Harold Greenstein - 1969 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 47:104.
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  35. added 2015-04-15
    How Valuable Are Chances?H. Orii Stefansson & Richard Bradley - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (4):602-625.
    Chance Neutrality is the thesis that, conditional on some proposition being true, its chance of being true should be a matter of practical indifference. The aim of this article is to examine whether Chance Neutrality is a requirement of rationality. We prove that given Chance Neutrality, the Principal Principle entails a thesis called Linearity; the centerpiece of von Neumann and Morgenstern’s expected utility theory. With this in mind, we argue that the Principal Principle is a requirement of practical rationality but (...)
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  36. added 2014-11-20
    On Don Ross's Defense of Neoclassical Economics.C. Mantzavinos - 2008 - Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (3).
  37. added 2014-10-10
    How Science Proceeds: The Role of Assumptions in the Explanation of Phenomena.Timothy P. Roth - 2001 - Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (3):420-422.
  38. added 2014-10-10
    Special Issue on Rationality and Methodology.Jochen Runde & Paul Anand - 1997 - Journal of Economic Methodology 4 (1):1-21.
  39. added 2014-10-10
    Institutions and Social Conflict, Jack Knight. Cambridge University Press, 1992, 234 + Xiii Pages.Malcolm Rutherford - 1995 - Economics and Philosophy 11 (2):370.
  40. added 2014-10-10
    A Reply to Professor Weintraub.Andrea Salanti - 1993 - Economics and Philosophy 9 (1):139.
  41. added 2014-10-10
    The New Palgrave: A Dictionary of Economics. John Eatwell, Murray Milgate, and Peter Newman . New York: Stockton Press, 1987, 949, 1044, 1085, and 1025 Pages. [REVIEW]Warren J. Samuels - 1990 - Economics and Philosophy 6 (2):301.
  42. added 2014-10-10
    Philosophy of Economics By C. Dyke Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1981, 184 + Viii Pp., £5.15.David-Hillel Ruben - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (218):582-.
    review of Philosophy of Economics by C. Dyke.
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  43. added 2014-09-30
    Philosophy of Economics: On the Scope of Reason in Economic Inquiry, Subroto Roy. London: Routledge, 1989, Ix + 236 Pages. [REVIEW]Steven Rappaport - 1990 - Economics and Philosophy 6 (2):332.
  44. added 2014-09-30
    Economic Methodology: A Bibliography with References to Works in the Philosophy of Science, 1860-1988.Deborah A. Redman - 1989 - Greenwood Press.
  45. added 2014-09-30
    Arguments, Truth, and Economic Methodology.Steven Rappaport - 1988 - Economics and Philosophy 4 (1):170.
  46. added 2014-09-30
    Economic Methodology.Steven Rappaport - 1988 - Economics and Philosophy 4 (1):110.
  47. added 2014-09-30
    Economics is Too Important to Be Left to the Rhetoricians.Alexander Rosenberg - 1988 - Economics and Philosophy 4 (1):129.
  48. added 2014-09-25
    Ambiguity and Logic, by Frederic Schick. Cambridge University Press, 2003, IX + 154 Pages. [REVIEW]Erik J. Olsson - 2005 - Economics and Philosophy 21 (1):161-164.
  49. added 2014-09-25
    Book Review:The Philosophy of Economics: On the Scope of Reason in Economic Inquiry. Subroto Roy. [REVIEW]Alan Nelson - 1991 - Ethics 101 (4):883-.
  50. added 2014-09-25
    The Very Idea of Epistemology.Donald McCloskey - 1989 - Economics and Philosophy 5 (1):1.
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