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  1. F17. Buddhism, Prenatal Diagnosis and Human Cloning.Pinit Ratanakul & Buddhist Tenets - forthcoming - Bioethics in Asia: The Proceedings of the Unesco Asian Bioethics Conference (Abc'97) and the Who-Assisted Satellite Symposium on Medical Genetics Services, 3-8 Nov, 1997 in Kobe/Fukui, Japan, 3rd Murs Japan International Symposium, 2nd Congress of the Asi.
  2. A Blueprint for Buddhist Revolution: The Radical Buddhism of Seno'o Girō (1889–1961) and the Youth League for Revitalizing Buddhism. [REVIEW]James Mark Shields - forthcoming - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.
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  3. Popular Buddhist Orthodoxy in Contemporary Japan.George J. Tanabe Jr - forthcoming - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.
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  4. Contemporary Japanese Philosophy: A Reader.John W. M. Krummel - 2019 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This important volume introduces the reader to a variety of schools of thought. Ideal for classroom use, this is the ultimate resource for students and teachers of Japanese philosophy.
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  5. The World I Which Everything is the Self: The Philosophy of the Original Image and Pan-Self-Ism.Naozumi Mitani - 2019 - In Jay Garfield (ed.), Wilfrid Sellars and Buddhist Philosophy. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 3-31.
    The aim of this paper is to explore and try to give an answer to the question: what happens when the philosophy of Wilfrid Sellars meets the tradition of Japanese Buddhist philosophy.
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  6. The Buddha in Yoshiwara: Religion and Visual Entertainment in Tokugawa Japan as Seen Through Kibyōshi.Takashi Miura - 2017 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 44 (2).
  7. Sacred Appellations: Secular Zen, New Materialism, and D. T. Suzuki’s Soku-Hi Logic.Rossa Ó Muireartaigh - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:69-83.
    The logic of soku-hi is presented as an articulation of a post-Kantian view of reality that embraces the truths of science with the assumption of the transcendental subject. As such, soku-hi represents the philosophical posture of both the secular Zen of the Kyoto School and the new materialists of contemporary continental philosophy. It describes how material reality is not all even though there is nothing else.
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  8. Buddhist Philosophy of the Global Mind for Sustainable Peace.Juichiro Tanabe - 2017 - Dialogue and Universalism 27 (2):17-30.
    While violence and conflict are the main problems that must be tackled for a peaceful world, they are caused and sustained through our own thoughts. Though external causes must not be ignored, the most fundamental problem is an epistemological one—our way of knowing and understanding the world. Since its beginning, Buddhism has deepened its analysis of the dynamics of the human mind, both as a root cause of suffering and as a source of harmony. This paper explores how Buddhism's analysis (...)
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  9. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Philosopher la Traduction / Philosophizing Translation.Mayuko Uehara (ed.) - 2017 - Chisokudo Publications.
    For the ninth volume of Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy, titled bilingually in French and English Philosopher la traduction/Philosophizing translation, most of the contributors wrote their articles in foreign languages. By claiming that philosophy has a fundamental “translation-ness”, the editor believes that we can open Japanese philosophy to pluralistic orientations from the perspective of the thematic of “translation,” and in doing so probe into the essential problems of Japanese philosophy. The pieces collected here focus on questions of translation derived from observations (...)
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  10. A Rite of Their Own: Japanese Buddhist Nuns and the Anan Kōshiki.Barbara R. Ambros - 2016 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 43 (1):207-250.
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  11. Editors' Introduction: Kōshiki in Japanese Buddhism.Barbara R. Ambros, James L. Ford & Michaela Mross - 2016 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 43 (1):1-15.
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  12. Imagining Rāhula in Medieval Japan.Lori Meeks - 2016 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 43 (1):131-151.
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  13. Theory of Personhood in Nishida Kitarō and Mou Zongsan: Reflections on Critical Buddhism's View of the Kyoto School.Tomomi Asakura - 2015 - Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 12 (1):41-63.
    This paper attempts to interpret the theory of personhood in the works of Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945) in a way that refutes a certain type of Nishida interpretation that Critical Buddhism offers. According to this type of interpretation, the logic of basho is a modern version of the Qixinlun system. Based on this interpretation, Critical Buddhism denounces Kyoto School philosophy as "topical Buddhism." This paper shows how Nishida himself consciously differentiates his philosophy from the idealistic and monistic system with which the (...)
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  14. Śūnyatā and Kokoro: Science–Religion Dialogue in the Japanese Context.Seung Chul Kim - 2015 - Zygon 50 (1):155-171.
    When we read books or essays about the dialogue between “religion and science,” or when we attend conferences on the theme of “religion and science,” we cannot avoid the impression that they actually are dealing, almost without exception, not with a dialogue between “religion and science,” but with a dialogue between “Christianity and science.” This could easily be affirmed by looking at the major publications in this field. But how can the science–religion dialogue take place in a world where conventional (...)
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  15. Whose Buddhism? Whose Identity? Presenting and/or Misrepresenting Shin Buddhism for a Christian Audience: AAR Panel on Multiple Religious Belonging and Buddhist Identity November, 2013.Kristin Johnston Largen - 2015 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 35:29-35.
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  16. Empire of the Dharma: Korean and Japanese Buddhism, 1877–1912 by Hwansoo Ilmee Kim.Jin Y. Park - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (2):630-632.
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  17. Research and Evaluation of Japanese Buddhist Objects in European Museum: Lessons of a Digitalization Project.I. M. Steineck Tomoë - 2015 - In .
  18. Review Of: Heather Blair, Real and Imagined: The Peak of Gold in Heian Japan. [REVIEW]Jonathan E. Thumas - 2015 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 42 (2).
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  19. The Lotus Sutra as the Core of Japanese Buddhism: Shifts in Representations of its Fundamental Principle.Endo Asai - 2014 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 41 (1).
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  20. Interfaith Dialogue and a Lotus Practitioner: Yamada Etai, the Lotus Sutra, and the Religious Summit Meeting on Mt. Hiei.Stephen G. Covell - 2014 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 41 (1).
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  21. Japanese Buddhist Thought and Continental Philosophy: Three Perspectives.Dennis Hirota - 2014 - Contemporary Buddhism 15 (2):432-432.
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  22. Wegzeichen : Japanische Kult- Und Pilgerbilder : Die Sammlung Wilfried Spinner : Japanese Devotional and Pilgrimage Images : The Wilfried Spinner Collection = Tokens of the Path.Tomoë I. M. Steineck, Martina Wernsdörfer & Raji C. Steineck - 2014 - Arnoldsche Art Publishers.
  23. An Inquiry Into the Historical Development of Philosophy in Japan.Kelly Louise Rexzy P. Agra - 2013 - Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 17 (2):27-59.
    What is Japanese philosophy? This paper will address this question, not by giving a survey of the works of Japanese philosophers or a definition of the subject matter of Japanese philosophy, but by attempting to present how it emerged as a distinct philosophical tradition—by sketching the controversies that gave rise to its formation; the social, intellectual, and historical factors that paved the way to its development; and the revolution of thought which finally gave it the title “Japanese philosophy.” I will (...)
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  24. The Japanese Roboticist Masahiro Mori’s Buddhist Inspired Concept of “The Uncanny Valley".W. A. Borody - 2013 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 23 (1):31-44.
    In 1970, the Japanese roboticist and practicing Buddhist Masahiro Mori wrote a short essay entitled “On the Uncanny Valley” for the journal Energy . Since the publication of this two-page essay, Mori’s concept of the Uncanny Valley has become part and parcel of the discourse within the fields of humanoid robotics engineering, the film industry, culture studies, and philosophy, most notably the philosophy of transhumanism. In this paper, the concept of the Uncanny Valley is discussed in terms of the contemporary (...)
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  25. Plotting the Prince: Shotoku Cults and the Mapping of Medieval Japanese Buddhism.Kevin Carr - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  26. Semiotics of Japan's Mountain Ascetics.Yoshiko Okuyama - 2013 - American Journal of Semiotics 29 (1/4):17 - 38.
    This ethnographic research features Shugendō , Japan’s centuries-old, mystical tradition. I and approximately fifty other lay participants took part in a three-day Shugendō program for the secular. The program is physically demanding and takes secular trainees to three holy mountains in Yamagata, Japan, where they take part in the water purification and holy fire rituals in the mountain asceticism tradition. Using the theoretical framework of semiotics, I explicate the visual signifiers of this esoteric mysticism in the context of Shugendō teachings (...)
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  27. Images That Don't Fit: »Buddhism« Vs. Japanese Buddhist Objects.Raji C. Steineck - 2013 - In .
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  28. Japanese Buddhist Temples in Hawaii: An Illustrated Guide.George J. Tanabe & Willa Jane Tanabe - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  29. A Handbook to Classical Japanese.John Timothy Wixted - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
  30. Three Boys on a Great Vehicle: ‘Mahayana Buddhism’ and a Trans-National Network.Shin'ichi Yoshinaga - 2013 - Contemporary Buddhism 14 (1):52-65.
    From 1915?1916 there was in Kyoto a trans-national group of Buddhists named the Mahayana Association, which published an English Buddhist periodical, Mahayanist. Two members of the Mahayana Association, William Montgomery McGovern and M. T. Kirby, were among the earliest cases of Westerners ordained in the tradition of Mahayana Buddhism in Japan. Kirby explored the temples of J?do Shinsh? and the monastic life of Rinzai Zen and Theravada Buddhism in search of salvation. McGovern, on the other hand, had been searching for (...)
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  31. Critical Readings in the Intellectual History of Early Modern Japan.W. J. Boot (ed.) - 2012 - Brill.
    This volume of Critical Readings provides an overview of recent scholarship about Japanese thought, as it took shape during the Edo Period. It contains articles about all participants in the intellectual debate: Buddhism, Confucianism, National Studies, and Dutch Learning.
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  32. Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen's Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics.James Mark Shields - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1):128-130.
    While there has been a surge in scholarship on Imperial Way Buddhism (kōdō Bukkyō) in the past several decades, little attention has been paid, particularly in Western scholarship, to the life and work of Ichikawa Hakugen (1902–1986), the most prominent and sophisticated postwar critic of the role of Buddhism, and particularly Zen, in modern Japanese militarism. By way of a thorough and critical investigation of Ichikawa’s critique, Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen’s Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics by Christopher Ives (...)
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  33. Focillon, Bergson and Buddhist Aesthetics: A Point in Focillon's Reception of Japanese Art.Bob Wilkinson - 2012 - Contrastes: Supplementos 17:275-288.
    Focillon fastens exactly on a deep difference in the understanding of aesthetic contemplation in the Western and Eastern traditions. Western analyses presuppose and embody assumptions about the ontological ultimacy of individuals that are absent from Eastern traditions in which the ultimate is conceived of as nothingness. Focillon grasped this, and his views are contrasted with those of Bergson, as well as being confirmed by his contemporary, the eminent Japanese philosopher Nishida.
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  34. Focillon, Bergson and Buddhist Aesthetics : A Point in Focillon's Reception of Japanese Art.Robert Wilkinson - 2012 - Contrastes: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 17:275-288.
    This essay focuses on a point in Henri Focillon's interpretation of the aesthetics of Japanese art. Focillon fastens very precisely on a deep difference which exists in the understanding of the idea of aesthetic contemplation in the Western and Eastern traditions. Western traditional analyses of contemplation presuppose and embody assumptions about the ontologicalultimacy of individuals that are absent from Eastern traditions in which the ultimate is conceived of as nothingness. In particular, the idea that the absolute is fully manifested in (...)
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  35. Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook.James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John C. Maraldo - 2011 - University of Hawaiʻi Press.
  36. Review Of: James Mark Shields, Critical Buddhism: Engaging with Modern Japanese Buddhist Thought. [REVIEW]Joseph S. O'Leary - 2011 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 38 (2):399-401.
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  37. Duncan Ryuken Williams and Tomoe Moriya, Eds., Issei Buddhism in the Americas.Kenneth K. Tanaka - 2011 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 38 (2).
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  38. Medical Treatment and Buddhism – Reflections From the Discussion on Brain Death and Organ Transplantation in Japanese Buddhism.Tobias Bauer - 2010 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 20 (2):58-64.
  39. Gods, Buddhas, and Organs: Buddhist Physicians and Theories of Longevity in Early Medieval Japan.Edward Drott - 2010 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37 (2):247-273.
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  40. Review Of: Shoji Yamada, Shots in the Dark: Japan, Zen and the West. [REVIEW]Victor Hori - 2010 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37 (1):153-160.
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  41. The Ground of Translation: Issues in Translating Premodern Japanese Philosophy.Thomas P. Kasulis - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 7-38.
  42. Hōtoku Shisō to Kindai Kyōto.Nobuhisa Namimatsu - 2010 - Shōwadō.
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  43. “Mind” in Ancient Japanese: The Primitive Perception of its Existence.Ken-Ichi Sasaki - 2010 - Diogenes 57 (3):3-19.
  44. Book Review: The Prince and the Monk: Shōtoku Worship in Shinran's Buddhism, by Kenneth Doo Young Lee, State University of New York Press, 2007. 242pp., Hb. [REVIEW]Wei-yu Wayne Tan - 2010 - Buddhist Studies Review 27:245-248.
  45. Merleau-Ponty and Buddhism.Michael P. Berman, David Brubaker, Gerald Cipriani, Jay Goulding, Hyong-hyo Kim, Gereon Kopf, Glen A. Mazis, Shigenori Nagatomo, Carl Olson, Bernard Stevens, Funaki Toru & Brook Ziporyn (eds.) - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    Merleau-Ponty and Buddhism explores a new mode of philosophizing through a comparative study of Maurice Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology and philosophies of major Buddhist thinkers including Nagarjuna, Chinul, Dogen, Shinran, and Nishida Kitaro. The book offers an intercultural philosophy in which opposites intermingle in a chiasmic relationship, and which brings new understanding regarding the self and the self's relation with others in a globalized and multicultural world.
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  46. Invitation to the Secret Buddha of Zenkōji: Kaichō and Religious Culture in Early Modern Japan.Nam-lin Hur - 2009 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 36 (1):45-63.
  47. Self and No-Self: Continuing the Dialogue Between Buddhism and Psychotherapy.Dale Mathers, Melvin E. Miller & Osamu Ando (eds.) - 2009 - Routledge.
    This collection explores the growing interface between Eastern and Western concepts of what it is to be human from analytical psychology, psychoanalytic and Buddhist perspectives. The relationship between these different approaches has been discussed for decades, with each discipline inviting its followers to explore the depths of the psyche and confront the sometimes difficult psychological experiences that can emerge during any in-depth exploration of mental processes. _Self and No-Self_ considers topics discussed at the Self and No-Self conference in Kyoto, Japan (...)
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  48. Review of Death and Social Order in Tokugawa Japan: Buddhism, Anti-Christianity, and the Danka System, by Nam-Lin Hur. [REVIEW]Laura Nenzi - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (3):398-399.
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  49. Merleau-Ponty and Buddhism.Jin Y. Park & Gereon Kopf (eds.) - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    Merleau-Ponty and Buddhism explores a new mode of philosophizing through a comparative study of Maurice Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology and philosophies of major Buddhist thinkers including Nagarjuna, Chinul, Dogen, Shinran, and Nishida Kitaro. The book offers an intercultural philosophy in which opposites intermingle in a chiasmic relationship, and which brings new understanding regarding the self and the self's relation with others in a globalized and multicultural world.
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  50. Review Of: Kenji Matsuo, A History of Japanese Buddhism. [REVIEW]Robert Rhodes - 2009 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 36 (2):388-391.
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