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  1. Contemporary Japanese Philosophy: A Reader.John W. M. Krummel - 2019 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This important volume introduces the reader to a variety of schools of thought. Ideal for classroom use, this is the ultimate resource for students and teachers of Japanese philosophy.
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  2. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Philosopher la Traduction / Philosophizing Translation.Mayuko Uehara (ed.) - 2017 - Chisokudo Publications.
    For the ninth volume of Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy, titled bilingually in French and English Philosopher la traduction/Philosophizing translation, most of the contributors wrote their articles in foreign languages. By claiming that philosophy has a fundamental “translation-ness”, the editor believes that we can open Japanese philosophy to pluralistic orientations from the perspective of the thematic of “translation,” and in doing so probe into the essential problems of Japanese philosophy. The pieces collected here focus on questions of translation derived from observations (...)
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  3. In Search of the Way: Thought and Religion in Early-Modern Japan, 1582-1860. [REVIEW]Richard Bowring - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In Search of the Way deals with intellectual and religious developments in early-modern Japan. It touches on the fate of Christianity but mainly covers Buddhism, Shinto, and Neo-Confucianism, particularly the latter. Of central concern is the constant debate over how society should be organized and how the individual can achieve self-fulfilment as just one element of a larger whole. It touches on such matters as ritual, pilgrimage, and religion in practice, but the emphasis is on ideological debate, disagreement, and consensus.
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  4. Jeffrey L. Richey, Confucius in East Asia: Confucianism's History in China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam, Association of Asian Studies, 2013, Xvii + 99 Pp. [REVIEW]Peitao Jia - 2016 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 17 (1):137-139.
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  5. V. Attack on Neo-Confucianism.Thomas R. H. Havens - 2015 - In Nishi Amane and Modern Japanese Thought. Princeton University Press. pp. 114-140.
  6. A Confucian Understanding of the Kyoto School's Wartime Philosophy.Thomas Rhydwen - 2015 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):69-78.
    In his new work on the Kyoto School David Williams presents the first “reading” in English of the complete text of the three Chūō Kōron symposia held by members of the second generation in the early 1940s. In addition, he provides an extensive commentary that explores the inability of “liberal history” to account for the political realities of wartime Japan and the “moral worldview” of the four symposists. Adopting the empirical methodology of earlier works, Williams proposes an alternative thesis of (...)
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  7. Philosophy of Doctrinal Classification: Kōyama Iwao and Mou Zongsan.Tomomi Asakura - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):453-468.
    Doctrinal classification or the panjiao 判教 system of Chinese Buddhism has been rediscovered and renewed in modern East Asian philosophy since both the Kyoto School and New Confucianism clarified the philosophical meaning of this intellectual tradition. The theoretical relation between these two modern reconsiderations, however, has not yet been studied. I analyze the theory of panjiao in Kōyama Iwao 高山岩男 and Mou Zongsan 牟宗三 so as to identify and extract, despite their apparent irrelevance, the same type of philosophical argument concerning (...)
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  8. Neo-Confucianism and Industrial Relations in Meiji Japan.Stefania Lottanti von Mandach - 2014 - .
  9. An Inquiry Into the Historical Development of Philosophy in Japan.Kelly Louise Rexzy P. Agra - 2013 - Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 17 (2):27-59.
    What is Japanese philosophy? This paper will address this question, not by giving a survey of the works of Japanese philosophers or a definition of the subject matter of Japanese philosophy, but by attempting to present how it emerged as a distinct philosophical tradition—by sketching the controversies that gave rise to its formation; the social, intellectual, and historical factors that paved the way to its development; and the revolution of thought which finally gave it the title “Japanese philosophy.” I will (...)
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  10. On the Principle of Comparative East Asian Philosophy: Nishida Kitarō and Mou Zongsan.Tomomi Asakura - 2013 - National Central University Journal of Humanities 54:1-25.
    Recent research both on the Kyoto School and on the contemporary New Confucians suggests significant similarities between these two modern East Asian philosophies. Still missing is, however, an explanation of the shared philosophical ideas that serve as the foundation for comparative studies. For this reason, I analyze the basic theories of the two distinctly East Asian philosophies of Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945) and Mou Zongsan (1909-95) so as to identify and extract the same type of argument. This is an alternative to (...)
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  11. Postures et Pratiques de L'homme: Libéralisme, philosophie non-standard et pensée japonaise.Jordanco Sekulovski - 2013 - Paris, France: L'Harmattan.
    POSTURES ET PRATIQUES DE L'HOMME Libéralisme, philosophie non-standard et pensée japonaise Jordanco SEKULOVSKI Nous, les sans-philosophie ASIE Japon -/- La philosophie véhicule des distinctions dualistes dont la conflictualité affaiblit gravement notre sentiment de solidarité humaine ; affronter la philosophie sur son propre terrain mène à une impasse, toute objection à son règne métaphysique devant, pour être reçue, se formuler dans les termes mêmes de la métaphysique... Il s'agit donc de changer de terrain, ou de chemin... L'auteur s'appuie sur le kâta (...)
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  12. Skepticism and the Neo-Confucian Canon: Itō Jinsai’s Philosophical Critique of the Great Learning.John A. Tucker - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (1):11-39.
    This study examines Itō Jinsai’s 伊藤仁斎 criticisms of the Great Learning. Three primary sources are considered: Jinsai’s Shigi sakumon私擬策問 ; the Daigaku teihon大學定本 ; and his essay, “Daigaku wa Kōshi no isho ni arazaru no ben” 大學非孔氏之遺書辨, appended to his Gomō jigi語孟字義. The study suggests that Jinsai’s critical inclinations grew from his acceptance of Zhu Xi’s views about the value of doubt for progress in learning. The study also suggests that Jinsai’s thinking on the Great Learning had political implications derived (...)
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  13. A Handbook to Classical Japanese.John Timothy Wixted - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
  14. The Happiness of the Wicked: How Tokugawa Thinkers Dealt with the Problem.Olivier Ansart - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (2):161-175.
    Phenomena like the happiness of the wicked or the misfortune of the worthies were for Confucian thinkers, just as for Christian theologians, puzzles that their ?theories on fortune and misfortune?, just like Theodicies in the West, were trying, with some difficulty, to explain or rationalize. This article first surveys some standard explanations of the phenomena given by scholars of eighteenth-century Japan within the framework of the available monist, rationalist paradigms. Afterward, it turns to another type of representation of the world (...)
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  15. Critical Readings in the Intellectual History of Early Modern Japan.W. J. Boot (ed.) - 2012 - Brill.
    This volume of Critical Readings provides an overview of recent scholarship about Japanese thought, as it took shape during the Edo Period. It contains articles about all participants in the intellectual debate: Buddhism, Confucianism, National Studies, and Dutch Learning.
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  16. Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook.James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John C. Maraldo - 2011 - University of Hawaiʻi Press.
  17. Edo No Shisōshi: Jinbutsu, Hōhō, Renkan.Yūichirō Tajiri - 2011 - Chūō Kōron Shinsha.
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  18. The Confucian Roots of Zen No Kenkyū: Nishida's Debt to Wang Yang-Ming in the Search for a Philosophy of Praxis.Dermott J. Walsh - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (4):361 - 372.
    This essay takes as its focus Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitar? (1870?1945) and his seminal first text, An Inquiry into the Good (or in Japanese zen no kenky?). Until now scholarship has taken for granted the predominantly Buddhist orientation of this text, centered around an analysis of the central concept of ?pure experience? (junsui keiken) as something Nishdia extrapolates from his early experience of Zen meditation. However, in this paper I will present an alternative and more accurate account of the origins (...)
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  19. Kanseiki Mitogaku No Kenkyū: Suiken Kara Yūkoku E.Toshizumi Yoshida - 2011 - Yoshikawa Kōbunkan.
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  20. The Ground of Translation: Issues in Translating Premodern Japanese Philosophy.Thomas P. Kasulis - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 7-38.
  21. “Mind” in Ancient Japanese: The Primitive Perception of its Existence.Ken-Ichi Sasaki - 2010 - Diogenes 57 (3):3-19.
  22. Yamada Hōkoku No Yōmeigaku to Kyōiku Rinen No Tenkai.Washio Kurata - 2009 - Meitoku Shuppansha.
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  23. The Restoration of Confucianism in China and Japan: A New Source of Morality and Religion.Takahiro Nakajima - 2009 - In Wing Keung Lam & Ching Yuen Cheung (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 4: Facing the 21st Century. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 37-50.
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  24. Ōshio Heihachirō to Yōmeigaku.Yasuo Morita - 2008 - Izumi Shoin.
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  25. Neo-Confucian Converts in Early Modern Japan.Doyoung Park - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 9:63-68.
    This essay explores the sudden emergence of Neo-Confucianism as an independent intellectual and professional calling, and its adoption by both scholars and political leaders as the dominant intellectual and epistemological discourse in early modern Japan (1600-1868). I shall do this by examining two of the mostimportant early Neo-Confucian converts from Zen Buddhism, Fujiwara Seika and Hayashi Razan during the late 16th and the early 17th centuries. Their conversions were initially separate events, each prompted by personal circumstances and choices. But these (...)
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  26. Religious Policy and Local Beliefs Practical Interpretation of Neo-Confucian Rites in Early Modern Japan.Suzuki Takako - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:255-262.
    Neo-Confucian influence in early modern Japan was highly intellectual, indicating that Confucian ideals did not change the nature of Japanese norms of social lives. For early modern Japanese intellectuals, the conflict and contradiction between reality and ideals had always been a source of debate and inspiration. Within the theme of Neo-Confucian rites, the contradiction was highlighted owing to the fact that it included a guideline for authentic ancestral worship and religious policy. Once introduced within the Japanese circumstances of the day, (...)
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  27. Japanese Confucian Philosophy.John Tucker - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  28. Confucianism and Human Rights in Meiji Japan.John Allen Tucker - 2008 - In Zhongying Cheng & On Cho Ng (eds.), The Imperative of Understanding: Chinese Philosophy, Comparative Philosophy, and Onto-Hermeneutics: A Tribute Volume Dedicated to Professor Chung-Ying Cheng. Global Scholarly Publications.
  29. Review Of: William R. Lindsey. Fertility and Pleasure: Ritual and Sexual Values in Tokugawa Japan. [REVIEW]Charlotte Eubanks - 2007 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 34 (2):456-458.
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  30. Gendai Mitogaku Ron Hihan.Takao Kajiyama - 2007 - Hatsubaijo Kinseisha.
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  31. Tokugawa Nihon No Shisō Keisei to Jukyō.Tadashi Sakuma - 2007 - Perikansha.
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  32. Kaiho Seiry on 'What It is to Be a Human Being'.Olivier Ansart - 2006 - Asian Philosophy 16 (1):65 – 86.
    Kaiho Seiry (1755-1817) is probably the first Japanese thinker to proclaim the contractual nature of human relationships. I examine in this paper the view of human beings that led him to this conclusion. Giving up previous definitions of humans, Seiry focuses on the faculty of practical reason. While this leads him to recognize a hierarchy of humans, some having more humanity than others, it also allows him to develop the most modern understanding of social relationship available in his time. His (...)
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  33. Kinsei Jusha No Shisō Chōsen.Yukihiko Motoyama - 2006 - Shibunkaku Shuppan.
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  34. 山崎闇斎の世界.Yūichirō Tajiri - 2006 - Perikansha.
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  35. Jukyō Tetsugaku No Kenkyū.Toshisada Suzuki - 2005 - Meiji Shoin.
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  36. The Material Imagination and Images of Gaston Bachelard: The Possibility of Communication of Images as Subjective Recognition.Keiko Hashizume - 2004 - Bigaku 55 (1):28.
    Nishida Kitaro's term "artistic intuition" has four aspects. The first aspect is connected with creativity. The second is grounded in the body. And so, Nishida pays attention to "imitation"which is a means to obtain it, and "habit" which enriches it. The third, it subjectivity is moved by an "internal creative force", which is connected to "unifying force of the universe". Nishida insists on "the unity of subject and object" grounded on "love". This is "a great world".The fourth, in this case, (...)
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  37. Itō Jinsai No Sekai.Nobukuni Koyasu - 2004 - Perikansha.
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  38. The Relation of Nishida Kitaro's View on Art to Confucianism.Hidenori Nagasako - 2004 - Bigaku 55 (1):14.
    Nishida Kitaro's term "artistic intuition" has four aspects. The first aspect is connected with creativity. The second is grounded in the body. And so, Nishida pays attention to "imitation"which is a means to obtain it, and "habit" which enriches it. The third, it subjectivity is moved by an "internal creative force", which is connected to "unifying force of the universe". Nishida insists on "the unity of subject and object" grounded on "love". This is "a great world".The fourth, in this case, (...)
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  39. Shin Kan Jukyō No Kenkyū.Tetsurō Saiki - 2004 - Kyūko Shoin.
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  40. Art, The Ethical Self, and Political Eremitism: Fujiwara Seika’s Essay on Landscape Painting.John Allen Tucker - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):47-63.
  41. Revisioning Religion in Ancient Japan.Yoshida Kazuhiko - 2003 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 30 (1-2):1-26.
  42. Confucianism and Zen: On Yang Ci-hu's Doctrine of Mind and Buddhism.Shin-chu Wang - 2003 - Philosophy and Culture 30 (6):3-16.
    Yang Cihu thinking of "the world Weixin", "no meaning" and launched not only inherited the essence of Mind Lu Xiangshan and Wang Yangming enlightening. He also thought that a bold distinctive absorbed Buddhist ideas, borrowed Buddhist and some areas of reasoning, and even Buddhist figures compared with the Confucian character. Having said that, Tzuhu subject or Confucian thought. However, if it will pass in Confucianism and Buddhism in the Neo-thinking in the context of this large, beyond the analysis of Confucianism (...)
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  43. The Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 2: Heian Japan.Robert Borgen, Donald H. Shively & William H. McCullough - 2002 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 122 (4):839.
  44. Review of Itō Jinsai's Gomō Jigi and the Philosophical Definition of Early Modern Japan by John Allen Tucker. [REVIEW]Samuel Hideo Yamashita - 2002 - Philosophy East and West 52 (3):392-395.
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  45. Review of Sourcebook for Modern Japanese Philosophy: Selected Documents by David A. Dilworth; Valdo H. Viglielmo; Agustin Jacinto Zavala. [REVIEW]Steven Heine - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):311-312.
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  46. Review Of: Engelbert Kaempfer, Kaempfer's Japan: Tokugawa Culture Observed. [REVIEW]Joseph O'leary - 2000 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 27 (1-2):137-139.
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  47. Nakae Tåoju, 1608-1648 Et Kumazawa Banzan, 1619-1691 Deux Penseurs de l''epoque D'Edo.Jean-franðcois Soum - 2000
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  48. Idealism, Protest, and the Tale of Genji: The Confucianism of Kumazawa Banzan (1619-91).James McMullen - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    This book is a new study of the leading seventeenth-century samurai Confucian, Kumazawa Banzan (1619-91). It describes his stormy life as a samurai, his interpretation of Confucian philosophy, and his imaginative commentary on Japan's greatest literary monument, The Tale of Genji. More than warrior and philosopher, Banzan is presented as a critic of the Japanese society of his day.
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  49. On the Integration of Confucianism in Japan Currently on the Influence of Confucianism on Japanese Economy.Jianming Xie - 1999 - Philosophy and Culture 26 (8):752-759.
    Confucianism in Japan after the introduction to Japanese political life, a deep imprint on the legal branded. Meanwhile, the Confucian culture in modern Japan, who was trying to resist Westernization, was nationalistic's a positive and welcoming. Japanese Confucian filial piety have homes Quanzhong tendency, which is the ideological basis of Japanese bushido. Confucian culture and economic development of the Japanese stable and orderly social environment. Thrifty and so is the spiritual core of Confucian culture, Japan's economic take-off power. Confucian patriarchal (...)
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  50. Itō Jinsai's Gomō Jigi and the Philosophical Definition of Early Modern Japan.Jinsai Itō - 1998 - Brill.
    This volume presents the first unabridged translation of Ito Jinsai's (1627-1705) masterwork, the Gomo jigi (Philosophical Lexicography of the Analects and ...
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1 — 50 / 108