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  1. New Studies in Japanese Aesthetics.Minh Nguyen (ed.) - forthcoming - Lexington Books.
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  2. Japanese Aesthetics.Graham Parkes - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  3. Philosophy and the Martial Arts.Priest Graham & Young Damon (eds.) - forthcoming - Open Court.
  4. Artistic Production and the Making of the Artist: Applying Nishida Kitarō to Discussions of Authorship.Kyle Peters - 2018 - Philosophy East and West 68 (2):477-496.
    Nishida Kitarō's account of authorship and artistic production constitutes the focus of this essay.1 Its general thesis is that Nishida's keen attention to the subjective qua objective, active qua intuitive intersection can be used to articulate a new, bidirectional account of artistic production. This essay uses this bidirectional account to engage critically with those unidirectional interpretive procedures grounded in the life or death of the Author.2 It takes up the former as it privileges the subjective conditions of production, reducing text (...)
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  5. In Search of an Aesthetics of Emptiness: Two European Thinkers.Raquel Bouso - 2017 - In Michiko Yusa (ed.), The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Contemporary Japanese Philosophy. Londres, Reino Unido:
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  6. A Phenomenology of Weather and Qi.Maximilian Gregor Hepach - 2017 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 5:43-65.
    The following article aims to answer the question: “How do we experience weather and qi?” Answering this question addresses two problems: Both the phenomena of weather and qi elude classic phenomenological paradigms such as thing-perception and Dasein, brought forth by Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger, respectively. If phenomenology is concerned with giving an account of experience starting with the “things themselves,” weather and qi necessitate a different phenomenological paradigm, which comprehensively accounts for the experience of both. This article demonstrates that (...)
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  7. Leibliches Üben als Teil einer philosophischen Lebenskunst: Die Verkörperung von Kata in den japanischen Wegkünsten.Leon Krings - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:179-197.
    In this paper, I try to show how Japanese practices of self-cultivation found in the so-called “ways” can be interpreted as embodied forms of “caring for oneself ” and, therefore, as part of a philosophical Lebenskunst or art of living. To this end, I refer to phenomenological accounts of the body as well as to a unique notion of practice found in the writings of Dōgen Kigen, a thirteenth-century Japanese Zen master. Central to this essay is a concern with embodying (...)
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  8. Review of Erfahrungen des ki. Leibessphäre, Atmosphäre, Pansphäre. [REVIEW]Leon Krings - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:333-336.
  9. Merleau-Ponty and Nishida: "Interexpression" As Motor-Perceptual Faith.Adam Loughnane - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):710-737.
    Both Nishida Kitarō and Maurice Merleau-Ponty wrote extensively about artistic expression in their early works, yet in the last period of their careers that consideration is put mostly aside as they engage more directly with abstract ontological concerns. As this happens, a curiously overlooked concept becomes prominent in their writings, namely “faith.” While Merleau-Ponty’s is a “perceptual faith”, and Nishida’s is, broadly speaking, a religious faith, neither is strictly secular nor spiritual, yet both entail a remarkably similar ontology of the (...)
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  10. The Buddha in Yoshiwara: Religion and Visual Entertainment in Tokugawa Japan as Seen Through Kibyōshi.Takashi Miura - 2017 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 44 (2).
  11. New Essays in Japanese Aesthetics.Minh Nguyen (ed.) - 2017 - Lexington Books.
    This collection begins with an engaging historical overview of Japanese aesthetics and offers contemporary multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives on the artistic and aesthetic traditions of Japan and the central themes in Japanese art and aesthetics.
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  12. 8. Criticism of Art.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 82-84.
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  13. Review of The Line of the Arch: Intercultural Issues Between Aesthetics and Ethics. [REVIEW]John Altmann - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:378-382.
  14. Shinran as "Other": Revisiting Kurata Haykuzo's The Priest and His Disciples.Michihiro Ama - 2016 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 43 (2):253-274.
  15. Rilke E l'Oriente by Daniela Liguori.Marcello Barison - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (2):653-655.
    Der Berg, a poem written between 1906 and 1907, is perhaps one of the most emblematic places to approach the relationship between Rainer Maria Rilke and the East. The mountain we are speaking of is Fujiyama, to which the celebrated Japanese painter Katsushika Hokusai dedicated two woodcut cycles. Presumably, Rilke came into contact with Japanese art through Edmond Goncourt, who had devoted precisely to Hokusai a major critical study in 1908. Another version of the story sees Rilke as having read (...)
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  16. Kritik der Symbolischen Formen I: Symbolische Form Und Funktion by Raji C. Steineck.Thora Ilin Bayer - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1357-1359.
    For any reader with knowledge of the works of Ernst Cassirer, the question that will come to mind on approaching Raji C. Steineck’s Kritik der symbolischen Formen I: Symbolische Form und Funktion is: Why Japan? Cassirer’s great range of writings on the history of thought, culture, and symbol involves no sustained attention to Japanese culture. Cassirer also never addresses problems of East-West philosophy, nor did he, unlike some other German thinkers in the twentieth century, engage in correspondence with Japanese thinkers. (...)
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  17. Learning, Play, and Creativity: Asobi, Suzuki Harunobu, and the Creative Practice.David Raymond Bell - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (4):86-113.
    How was creativity understood in the distinctive artistic practices of eighteenth-century Japan? How were its artists able to maintain consistently inventive creative pathways over extended periods? Artistic creativity is sometimes assumed to derive from chance, opportune, or accidental events. For early Western creativity theorists like Graham Wallas,1 Alex Osborn,2 or Robert Fritz 3 such fortunate moments of illumination engendered creative innovation. The invention of synthetic dyes,4 Japanese haboku “splashed ink painting,” or Jackson Pollock’s spatters of paint all involved elements of (...)
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  18. Nishida and Merleau-Ponty: Art, “Depth,” and “Seeing Without a Seer”.Adam Loughnane - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:47-74.
    This paper sets Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Nishida Kitarō in dialogue and explore the interpretations of artistic expression, which inform their similar phenomenological accounts of perception. I discuss how both philosophers look to artistic practice to reveal multi-perspectival aspects of vision. They do so, I argue, by going beyond a “positivist” representational under-standing of perception and by including negative aspects of visual experience as constitutive of vision. Following this account, I interpret artworks by Cézanne, Guo Xi, Rodin, and Hasegawa according to (...)
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  19. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 8: Critical Perspectives on Japanese Philosophy.Takeshi Morisato (ed.) - 2016 - Nagoya: Chisokudo Publications.
    The present volume is the latest example of what scholars of Japanese philosophy have been up to in recent years. The papers collected here, most of them presented at conferences held in Barcelona and Nagoya during 2016, have been arranged in four thematic parts. The first two parts cover the history of Japanese philosophy, as their topics extend from premodern thinkers to twentieth century philosophers; the last two parts focus on Nishida and Watsuji respectively.
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  20. Tragic Beauty in Whitehead and Japanese Aesthetics.Steve Odin - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    This book examines Whitehead’s process aesthetics focusing on two categories, the penumbral beauty of darkness and the tragic beauty of perishability, while establishing parallels with the Japanese sense of evanescent beauty. It clarifies how both traditions develop a religio-aesthetic vision of tragic beauty and its reconciliation in the supreme ecstasy of peace.
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  21. Nepantla, Cross-Cultural Encounters, and Literature: Latin America, India, Japan.Michael Palencia-Roth - 2016 - Diogenes:039219211666968.
    This essay briefly explores the phenomenon of nepantla in three representative cross-cultural encounters, in both initial and later phases: Spain-Latin America, England-India, and the West-Japan. N...
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  22. Verso L’Estetica Del Luogo: Per Una Monadologia Polifonica.Masaru Yoneyama - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:203-217.
    This paper aims to develop Nishida Kitarō’s “logic of place” into an “aesthetics of place.” While brilliantly fusing the Buddhist traditions of Japan with Western philosophy, in his later years, Nishida came up with his own unique philosophy, a “monadology with the concept of substance.” This is a concept anchored in mu or “emptiness.” From this standpoint, how is the individual understood and how does society take shape? The answers to these questions are fundamental keys to understanding Japanese philosophy. In (...)
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  23. Manga and Philosophy: Why Was the Book “Manga Introduction to Philosophy” Written?Masahiro Morioka - 2015 - The Review of Life Studies 6:1-28.
    Slightly modified PowerPoint slides in the PDF format presented at the first conference of the European Network of Japanese Philosophy, Barcelona, Spain. (December 4th, 2015).
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  24. Research and Evaluation of Japanese Buddhist Objects in European Museum: Lessons of a Digitalization Project.I. M. Steineck Tomoë - 2015 - In .
  25. Arte E Pensiero in Giappone: Corpo, Immagine, Gesto by Marcello Ghilardi. [REVIEW]Raquel Bouso - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (1):238-240.
    The traditional arts may possibly constitute that aspect of Japanese culture that has the most literature dedicated to it, and the new book by the Italian scholar Marcello Ghilardi, Arte e pensiero in Giappone: Corpo, immagine, gesto, should have a deservedly high place among the works in this genre.
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  26. Review Of: Tullio Federico Lobetti, Ascetic Practices in Japanese Religion. [REVIEW]Shayne A. P. Dahl - 2014 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 41 (2).
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  27. Religious Art and Meditative Contemplation in Japanese Calligraphy and Byzantine Iconography.Rodica Frentiu - 2014 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 13 (38):110-136.
    Far Eastern calligraphy has always been regarded by the Occident as an “esoteric” issue, laden with a peculiar “mysticism,” which presents spiritual and philosophical aspects too outlandish to truly comprehend. That is probably the reason why calligraphy was amongst the last artistic “disciplines” to gain access to the international world of the arts. This study focuses on Japanese calligraphy as a visual and verbal image, conducting a hermeneutic investigation into the nature and function of this type of image, into the (...)
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  28. Japan and the Culture of the Four Seasons: Nature, Literature, and the Arts by Haruo Shirane.Steven Heine - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (4):1100-1103.
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  29. Ticket to Salvation Nichiren Buddhism in Miyazawa Kenji’s Ginga Tetsudō No Yoru.Jon Holt - 2014 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 41 (2).
  30. Phenomenology of Japanese Architecture: En.Michael Lazarin - 2014 - Studia Phaenomenologica 14:133-159.
    Japanese architecture emphasizes transitional spaces between rooms rather than the rooms themselves. If these transitional spaces can be successfully realized, then everything in the room will naturally fall into place with anything else. This also applies to the relation between a building and other buildings stretching out through the whole city, and ultimately to the relation of the city to the natural environment. “En” is the Japanese word for such transitional spaces. It means both “edge” and “connection.” It also means (...)
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  31. Dharanis, Talismans, and Straw-Dolls Ritual Choreographies and Healing Strategies of the Rokujikyoho in Medieval Japan.Benedetta Lomi - 2014 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 41 (2).
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  32. The Ambivalent Relationship of Japan's Soft Power Diplomacy and Princess Mononoke : Tosaka Jun's Philosophy of Culture as Moral Reflection.Kosuke Shimizu - 2014 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 15 (4):683-698.
    Culture is a demanding word, particularly when it is used in the context of the contemporary academic discipline of international relations . It is often employed in order to distinguish one identity from another, allegedly illuminating idiosyncrasies embedded in a particular society or group of people. The essentialized understanding of culture is also detectable in the case of the current debate on the non-Western international relations theories . Non-Western politicians and scholars often employ the term culture in order to distinguish (...)
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  33. Pilgrimages to the Ancient Temples in Nara [Koji Junrei] by Watsuji Tetsurō.Laura Specker Sullivan - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (3):821-822.
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  34. Icons in Japan Painted by Rin Yamashita. Anonymity and Materiality.Michitaka Suzuki - 2014 - Convivium 1 (2):58-73.
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  35. The Last Biwa Singer: A Blind Musician in History, Imagination and Performance.Hugh De Ferranti, Robert Bagley, Gustav Heldt, Jennifer Rudolph, Yi Tae-Jin, Charlotte von Verschuer, Kristen Lee Hunter, Jessieca Leo, Catherine Despeux & Livia Kohn - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  36. Kenzaburō Ōe, The Silent Cry (Man'en Gannen No Futtobōru): The Game of Sacred Violence Between Myth, Logos and History in the Japanese Cultural Matrix.Rodica Frentiu - 2013 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (36):22-50.
    Studies of mythology and the philosophy of religions ascribe violence an important role in understanding traditional societies. Whether perceived as sacred and capable of renewing the world, or as oppressive and destructive, violence acquires a twofold valence, whose constituents are interpreted in a complementary relation of interdependence and entail a world outlook with profound implications. Retrieving this ambiguous dimension of religious violence, Kenzaburō Ōe’s novel imagines, against the historical background of post-war Japanese society, a game that enacts the eternal rivalry (...)
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  37. On Japanese Drama.Anna Hlaváčová - 2013 - Human Affairs 23 (1):105-107.
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  38. Visioning Eternity: Aesthetics, Politics, and History in the Early Modern Noh Theater.Thomas D. Looser, John Timothy Wixted, Charlotte von Verschuer, Kristen Lee Hunter, Noel J. Pinnington, Livia Kohn, Eiichi Kawata, A. Robert Lee & Roald Knutsen - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  39. The Wind From Vulture Peak: The Buddhification of Japanese Waka in the Heian Period.Stephen D. Miller - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  40. Metaphorical Circuit: Negotiations Between Literature and Science in 20th Century Japan.Joseph A. Murphy, Shu-Ning Sciban, Fred Edwards, Kim Su-Young, Shin Kyong-Nim, Lee Si-Young, Yi Châ, Patricia Grace, Chris Baker & Mark Sweet - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
  41. Japanese Paintings From the Henricksen Collection.Sewall Oertling - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  42. An Allegory of Labour: Life and the Self in the Art of Tatzu Nishi. Cultural Hijack in London.Ben Parry - 2013 - Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 15:47-64.
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  43. Passionate Friendship: The Aesthetics of Girl's Culture in Japan.Deborah Shamoon - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  44. The Man Who Saved Kabuki: Faubion Bowers and Theatre Censorship in Occupied Japan.Okamoto Shiro & Samuel L. Leiter - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  45. Purloined Letters: Cultural Borrowing and Japanese Crime Literature, 1868–1937.Mark Silver - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  46. Japanese Buddhist Temples in Hawaii: An Illustrated Guide.George J. Tanabe & Willa Jane Tanabe - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  47. Collectivism in 20th-Century Japanese Art.Reiko Tomii & Midori Yoshimoto - 2013 - Duke University Press.
    This special issue explores the significance of collectivism in modern and contemporary Japanese art. Japanese artists banded together throughout the twentieth century to work in collectives, reflecting and influencing each evolution of their culture. Illuminating the interplay between individual and community throughout Japan’s tumultuous century, the contributors to this issue examine both the practical internal operations of the collectives and the art that they produced. One contributor studies the art societies of prewar imperial Japan, whose juried art salons defined a (...)
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  48. Report on the 34th Conference of Japan Society for the Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education.Keiji Umeno - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education 35 (1):45-47.
  49. Becoming American?: The Art and Identity Crisis of Yasuo Kuniyoshi.ShiPu Wang - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  50. On the Structure of Contemporary Japanese Aesthetics.Rea Amit - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (2):174-185.
    The jargon of Japanese art criticism has always had an abundance of unique terms, categories, and concepts. This is not only true when discussing traditional Japan, since there are just as many new terms today as there were in the past. Some of the new terms have developed or evolved from old ones, while others have appeared with no seeming connection to any traditional tendency. Yet, only a few of these terms can be considered for the meta-level discussion of Aesthetics, (...)
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