This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

277 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 277
Material to categorize
  1. Ethical and Traditional Concerns in Contemporary Japanese Design.Parisa Yazdanpanah Abdolmaleki & Ehsan Daneshfar - 2011 - Asian Culture and History 3 (1):115-124.
    Similar to its old history, Japan has a rich traditional and ethical Architecture. Based on these tenets and ethics, different concepts and spaces are formed through the time, as now Japan's ethical and traditional design ideas has its standard principles. Linking the present and the past has always been a momentous criterion in the countries with an old rich Architecture. This fact is indeed important in Japan due to the blend of ethics and religions with peoples` life. Through this idea, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Kyōiku-Hōhōgaku.Takao Ando & Shuhet Ishivama (eds.) - unknown
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Professor at the School of Public Health, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW]Rachel A. Ankeny, M. L. S. Bette Anton, Ana Borovecki, Alister Browne, Debora Diniz, Elisa J. Gordon, Matti Häyry & Steve Heilig - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:215-217.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. 実践哲学の現在.Takayoshi Aoki, Kei Nishitani & Kiyokazu Washida - 1992
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Practicing Japanese Philosophy. Mind and Activity.Toru Arakawa (ed.) - 2012
  6. Death with Dignity is Impossible in Contemporary Japan: Considering Patient Peace of Mind in End-of-Life Care.A. Asai, K. Aizawa, Y. Kadooka & N. Tanida - 2012 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 22 (2):49-52.
    Currently in Japan, it is extremely difficult to realize the basic wish of protecting personal dignity at the end of life. A patient’s right to refuse life-sustaining treatment has not been substantially warranted, and advance directives have not been legally enforceable. Unfortunately, it is not until the patient is moribund that all concerned parties start to deliberate on whether or not death with dignity should be pursued. Medical intervention is often perceived as a worthwhile goal to not only preserve life, (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Ethical Issues In Japanese Clinical Settings In 1990's: Attitudes And Experiences Of The Japanese.Atsushi Asai & Tsuguya Fukui - 1997 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 7 (2):39-43.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. 人間の理念と政治哲学:哲学、倫理学、教育原理、道徳教育の研究、政治思想史等論集.Shigenori Asai & Kazuo Sekiguchi - 1995
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. 人倫と愛知:倫理学・哲学・論理学・教育学等論集.Shigenori Asai, Akira Takashima & Takashi Saitåo - 1993
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Nihonjin No Mentaritåi to Nihon No Kyåoiku.Tetsuråo Asao - 1999
  11. National Communion: Watsuji Tetsuro's Conception of Ethics, Power, and the Japanese Imperial State.Bernard Bernier - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (1):84-105.
    : Watsuji Tetsurō defined ethics as being generated by a double negation: the individual's negation of the community and the self-negation of the individual who returns to the community. Thus, ethics for him is based on the individual's sacrifice for the collectivity. This position results in the conception of the community as an absolute. I contend that there is a congruence between Watsuji's conception of ethics as self-sacrifice and the way he perceived the Japanese political system. To him, the imperial (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Kids and Crime: A Comparative Study of Youth Coverage in Japan and the United States.Tom Brislin & Yasuhiro Inoue - 2007 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 22 (1):3 – 17.
    This pilot study examines how a number of American and Japanese journalists make the tough calls regarding an escalating social problem: whether to identify juveniles who have been charged with serious capital crimes. Divergent societal and journalistic values of the two countries are explored via a survey of journalists from Honolulu and Hiroshima. Newsroom policies and practices are described regarding general and specific cases of juvenile crime. In general, Japanese journalists are far more likely than U.S. journalists to withhold names. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Japanese Ethics. Foreword by Yuasa Yasuo.Robert E. Carter - 2002 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 2003.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. The Formation of Modern Ethics in China and Japan: The Contributions of Inoue Tetsujirō and Cai Yuan-Pei.Wei-fen Chen - 2009 - In Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 4: Facing the 21st Century. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 195-210.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Between Principle and Situation: Contrasting Styles in the Japanese and Korean Traditions of Moral Culture.Chae-sik Chung - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (2):253-280.
    : We may better understand the development of the Neo-Confucian religiousethical tradition in East Asia if we can discern the different ways that the scholars of Japan and Korea reacted to and adjusted the discourse of the tradition. Focusing on the optimistic concept of human nature and an ethic of situation developed by the Kogakuha scholars in Japan, we will contrast them with the more rigoristic philosophy of kyŏng (reverential seriousness) and an ethic of principle emphasized by the Korean Neo-Confucian (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Transcending Modernity? Individualism, Ethics and Japanese Discourses of Difference in the Post-War World.John Clammer - 1999 - Thesis Eleven 57 (1):65-80.
    Intense debates have taken place in Japan about the country's role in the post-war world system and the question of whether Japan has achieved the modernity that makes it a member of and player in that system. These debates, however, have largely centred on a discourse of uniqueness, defined in cultural (and culturalist) terms. This domination of a single interpretative framework has suppressed alternative analyses of Japanese modernity. Some of the most significant of these alternative voices take the central question (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Watsuji Tetsurō’s Ethics of Milieu.Pauline Coteau - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 269-290.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. The Plexus of Relations: An East-West Theory of the Self.Bela Stephen Csaki - 2002 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Buffalo
    This dissertation is aimed at developing a new relational theory of the self. The methodology that I use is comparative in nature. Relational theories of the self from three different thinkers are presented, critically analyzed, compared, and contrasted. The end goal is to determine which aspects of each theory are both required and best describe the phenomenon of selfhood. ;The three philosophers are American pragmatist George Herbert Mead, French existentialist Jean-Paul Sartre, and Japanese Soto Zen Buddhist Dogen. The idea behind (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Dōgen, Deep Ecology, and the Ecological Self.Deane Curtin - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):195-213.
    A core project for deep ecologists is the reformulation of the concept of self. In searching for a more inclusive understanding of self, deep ecologists often look to Buddhist philosophy, and to the Japanese Buddhist philosopher Dōgen in particular, for inspiration. I argue that, while Dōgen does share a nondualist, nonanthropocentric framework with deep ecology, his phenomenology of the self is fundamentally at odds with the expanded Self found in the deep ecology literature. I suggest, though I do not fully (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Whistleblowing in Japan.Anne J. Davis & Emiko Konishi - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (2):194-202.
    This article, written from research data, focuses on the possible meaning of the data rather than on detailed statistical reporting. It defines whistleblowing as an act of the international nursing ethical ideal of advocacy, and places it in the larger context of professional responsibility. The experiences, actions, and ethical positions of 24 Japanese nurses regarding whistleblowing or reporting a colleague for wrongdoing provide the data. Of these respondents, similar in age, educational level and clinical experience, 10 had previously reported another (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21. Guiding Principles of Interpretation in Watsuji Tetsurō’s History of Japanese Ethical Thought: With Particular Reference to the Tension Between the Sonnō and Bushidō Traditions.David A. Dilworth - 2008 - In Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 101-112.
  22. Confucian Ethics and Japanese Management Practices.Marc J. Dollinger - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (8):575 - 584.
    This paper proposes that an important method for understanding the ethics of Japanese management is the systematic study of its Confucian traditions and the writings of Confucius. Inconsistencies and dysfunction in Japanese ethical and managerial behavior can be attributed to contradictions in Confucius' writings and inconsistencies between the Confucian code and modern realities. Attention needs to be directed to modern Confucian philosophy since, historically Confucian thought has been an early warning system for impending change.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  23. The New Individualism and Contemporary Japan: Theoretical Avenues and the Japanese New Individualist Path.Anthony Elliott, Masataka Katagiri & Atsushi Sawai - 2012 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (4):425-443.
    Recent social theory has identified various institutional forces operating at a global level promoting novel trends towards “individualization”, “reflexive self-identity” and “new individualism” (Beck and Beck-Gernsheim, 2001; Giddens, 1991, 1992; Elliott and Lemert, 2009, 2009a). This article develops an exploratory overview of the theory of new individualism with reference to Japanese sociologies of self specifically and contemporary Japanese society more generally. Detailing the large-scale societal shift in Japan from traditional forms of identity-construction (based on a citizenship model of social order) (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24. The Japanese Value of Harmony and Nursing Ethics.Konishi Emiko, Yahiro Michiko, Nakajima Naoko & Ono Miki - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (5):625-636.
    Harmony is one of the most fundamental Japanese values. It is derived from Confucianism and encompasses a state of mind, an action process and outcomes of the action. This article draws on research data and discusses Japanese nurses’ perceptions of harmony as reflected in their everyday practice. The most important virtues for these nurses were reported as politeness and respect for other persons. The outcome from the nurses’ harmonious practice, it is claimed, benefited patients and created peaceful, harmonious relationships for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25. Review Of: William R. Lindsey. Fertility and Pleasure: Ritual and Sexual Values in Tokugawa Japan. [REVIEW]Charlotte Eubanks - 2007 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 34 (2):456-458.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Buddhism as a Stronghold of Free Thinking?: Social, Ethical and Philosophical Dimensions of Buddhism.Siegfried C. A. Fay & Ilse Maria Bruckner (eds.) - 2011 - Edition Ubuntu.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Ecological Imagination In Moral Education, East And West.Steven Fesmire - 2011 - Annales Philosophici 2:20-34.
    Relational philosophies developed in classical American pragmatism and the Kyoto School of modern Japanese philosophy suggest aims for greater ecological responsiveness in moral education. To better guide education, we need to know how ecological perception becomes relevant to our deliberations. Our deliberations enlist imagination of a specifically ecological sort when the imaginative structures we use to understand ecosystemic relationships shape our mental simulations and rehearsals. Enriched through crosscultural dialogue, a finely aware ecological imagination can make the deliberations of the coming (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Don't Think! Just Act!Bronwyn Finnigan & Koji Tanaka - 2010 - In Graham Priest & Damon Young (eds.), Philosophy and the Martial Arts. Open Court.
    Kenzo saw a slight movement of his opponent. “Now is the time to strike!” he thought. He started moving. But before he had time to raise his shinai (sword) he was struck on the men (head) by his opponent. “Ippon!” the judge called.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Nitobe and Royce: Bushidō and the Philosophy of Loyalty.Mathew A. Foust - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (4):1174-1193.
    In recent years, scholars have increasingly paid attention to the philosophy of Josiah Royce. Long lost in the shadow of fellow classical American figures, Royce’s philosophy has enjoyed a renascence, with a spate of publications in a variety of venues studying and applying his thought.1 Like his philosophical brethren, Royce wrote on a wide variety of subjects, his discussions underpinned by a smattering of influences. Much has been remarked of the various Western sources that made an impression on Royce’s thought, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Zen and Ethics: Dōgen's Synthesis.Douglas A. Fox - 1971 - Philosophy East and West 21 (1):33-41.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Nihon Seikatsu Shisåo Kenkyåu.Noboru Fujiwara - 1989 - Seikatsu Shisåo Kenkyåukai.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Looking for Neuroethics in Japan.Maxence Gaillard - 2018 - Neuroethics 11 (1):67-82.
    Neuroethics is a dynamic and still rather young interdisciplinary field involving neuroscience, philosophy, or bioethics, among other academic specialties. It is under a process of institutionalization on a global scale, although not at the same pace in every country. Much literature has been devoted to the discussion of the purpose and relevance of neuroethics as a field, but few attempts have been made to analyze its local conditions of development. This paper describes the advancement of neuroethics in Japan as a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. Between Aesthetics and Ethics: The Experience of Seeing in Nicholas Cusanus and Nishida Kitarō.Marcello Ghilardi - 2008 - In Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Origins and Possibilities. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 140-154.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. The Virtues of Asian Humanism.Nick Gier - manuscript
    Note: The Soka Gakkei (The Value Creating Society) is the largest lay Buddhist Organization in the world. They are one of 200 Buddhists sects in Japan that follow the medieval monk Nichiren’s exclusive focus on the Lotus Sutra . Daisaku Ikeda, scholar and..
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Japanese Archery: Zen in Action.Chauncey S. Goodrich, André Sollier, Zsolt Györbiró, Andre Sollier & Zsolt Gyorbiro - 1971 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 91 (4):518.
  36. Educational Reform for Immigrant Youth in Japan.J. A. Gordon - unknown
    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.Transnational migration is seldom associated with Japan even though Japan has been dependent on immigrants for several generations. The research presented in this article explores a reform effort viewed as radical within the Japanese context that took place in a metropolitan school known for having one of the largest number of immigrant students in Japan, most of whom hail from Latin America, Southeast Asia, and China. While many of these “Newcomers” are of Japanese ancestry, absence (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Watsuji Tetsuro's Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan.David B. Gordon, Watsuji Tetsuro, Yamamoto Seisaku & Robert E. Carter - 1999 - Philosophy East and West 49 (2):216.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Body-Mind and Buddha Nature: Dōgen’s Deeper Ecology.Parkes Graham - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 122-€“147.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Human Values and HRM Practice: The Japanese Shukko System.R. J. Grainger & T. Miyamoto - 2003 - Journal of Human Values 9 (2):105-115.
    Aspects of the Japanese human resources management system are discussed to illustrate the underly ing significance of human values in Japanese organizational management, with a particular aspect of Japanese human resource management used as an illustrative case. Relevant literature is reviewed to introduce the relational Japanese management and human resources management systems, and to explain the system of inter-firm employee transfer within the corporate group known as the 'shukko' system. The paper then discusses various impacts of this HRM practice upon (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. The Japanese Enterprise: Sources of Competitive Strength.Gene Gregory - 1985 - Business and Society 24 (1):13-21.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Extortion Japanese Style.Tina Haida - 1998 - Business Ethics 7 (1):2–6.
    The emerging influence wielded on Japanese businesses by the sokaiya, or extortioners, raises issues not just of bribery but more fundamentally of corporate governance and transparency in the conduct of business. “If it were true that the Japanese companies in question were otherwise conducting their businesses in perfectly ethical ways, then sokaiya would not have any leverage”. The author has completed the first year of her MBA at London Business School after previously working with the Japanese Delegation to the OECD.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Extortion Japanese Style.Tina Haida - 1998 - Business Ethics: A European Review 7 (1):2-6.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Nihon Kyoiku Shiron.Sakuki Haruyama - 1979 - Kokudosha.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education in Japan: Its History, Characteristics and Prospects.Takayuki Hata & Masami Sekine - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):215-224.
    In this article, we examine philosophy of sport as a field of study in Japan, its history, characteristics, and future prospects, as part of a contribution to the international development of the discipline of sport philosophy. The Japan Society for the Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education has been holding an annual sport philosophy conference every year since its inception in 1978. Nevertheless, the trends of sport philosophy in Japan have not been conveyed abroad. The language barrier between Japanese and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. VI. Ethics for the New Society.Thomas R. H. Havens - 2015 - In Nishi Amane and Modern Japanese Thought. Princeton University Press. pp. 141-163.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. The Japanese Preschool's Pedagogy of Peripheral Participation.Akiko Hayashi & Joseph Tobin - 2011 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 39 (2):139-164.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. Review of Sourcebook for Modern Japanese Philosophy: Selected Documents by David A. Dilworth; Valdo H. Viglielmo; Agustin Jacinto Zavala. [REVIEW]Steven Heine - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):311-312.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Review Of: Robert E. Carter, Encounter with Enlightenment: A Study of Japanese Ethics. [REVIEW]James Heisig - 2003 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 30 (1-2):157-159.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Non-I and Thou: Nishida, Buber, and the Moral Consequences of Self-Actualization.James W. Heisig - 2000 - Philosophy East and West 50 (2):179-207.
    Ten years after Buber published his "I and Thou," the Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitarō published a book of the same title, knowing only Buber's name but nothing of his ideas. A comparison of these two works suggests certain fundamental differences between philosophies of being and philosophies of nothingness regarding the nature of human relationships. In particular, it points to the inherent tendency of the latter to remove moral responsibility and social consciousness to high but ineffective levels of abstraction.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook.James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John Maraldo - 2011 - University of Hawaiʻi Press.
1 — 50 / 277