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  1. The Place of God in Philosophy of Nishida Kitaro.Mohammad Asghari - 2013 - پژوهشنامه فلسفه دین 11 (1):135-149.
    This article tries to show the place of God in philosophy of Nishida Kitaro. Thus, religious aspect of philosophical thought of Nishida has been considered in four themes, namely, God as the ground of reality, absolute nothingness, divine love, and religion. Nishida interprets God in mystical vocabulary which it is similar to theory of pantheism. He explains relation between God and the creatures as manifestation of God. For him, God is the ground of reality and according this opinion, there is (...)
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  2. The Appropriation of ‘Enlightenment’ in Modern Korea and Japan: Competing Ideas of the Enlightenment and the Loss of the Individual Subject.Lee Yeaann - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (9):912-923.
    In recent decades in Korea, many significant changes in political, social and cultural dimensions have been held by the citizen’s initiative, where the revitalization of citizenship and strong civic unity have played a role. Yet, in regard to the characteristic of Korean citizenship, it seems that the aspect of individual subject has not been fully matured or issued; that is, there is a dissymmetry between the strong civic unity and a weak individual subject. This paper attempts to explore a possible (...)
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  3. Eco-Phenomenology: The Japanese Original Perspective in the Thought of Nishida Kitaro.Valentina Carella - 2018 - In Daniela Verducci, Jadwiga Smith & William Smith (eds.), Eco-Phenomenology: Life, Human Life, Post-Human Life in the Harmony of the Cosmos. Springer Verlag.
    Eco-phenomenology developed from the effort of a number of continentally-oriented philosophers exploring the thought of decisive authors in the phenomenological tradition, such as Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty, with the purpose of offering a different insight into environmental issues than those predominant in Anglo-American philosophy. This initiative has proceeded not only from Western scholars but has had a resonance also in the distant philosophical tradition of Japan. The present contribution seeks to deepen the thought of a central figure for Japanese phenomenology: (...)
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  4. Practicing Japanese Philosophy. Mind and Activity.Toru Arakawa (ed.) - 2012
  5. A Phenomenology of Weather and Qi.Maximilian Gregor Hepach - 2017 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 5:43-65.
    The following article aims to answer the question: “How do we experience weather and qi?” Answering this question addresses two problems: Both the phenomena of weather and qi elude classic phenomenological paradigms such as thing-perception and Dasein, brought forth by Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger, respectively. If phenomenology is concerned with giving an account of experience starting with the “things themselves,” weather and qi necessitate a different phenomenological paradigm, which comprehensively accounts for the experience of both. This article demonstrates that (...)
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  6. Watsuji Tetsuro's Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan.David B. Gordon, Watsuji Tetsuro, Yamamoto Seisaku & Robert E. Carter - 1999 - Philosophy East and West 49 (2):216.
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  7. Looking for Neuroethics in Japan.Maxence Gaillard - 2018 - Neuroethics 11 (1):67-82.
    Neuroethics is a dynamic and still rather young interdisciplinary field involving neuroscience, philosophy, or bioethics, among other academic specialties. It is under a process of institutionalization on a global scale, although not at the same pace in every country. Much literature has been devoted to the discussion of the purpose and relevance of neuroethics as a field, but few attempts have been made to analyze its local conditions of development. This paper describes the advancement of neuroethics in Japan as a (...)
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  8. The Formation of Modern Ethics in China and Japan: The Contributions of Inoue Tetsujirō and Cai Yuan-Pei.Wei-fen Chen - 2009 - In Wing Keung Lam & Ching Yuen Cheung (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 4: Facing the 21st Century. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 195-210.
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  9. Between Aesthetics and Ethics: The Experience of Seeing in Nicholas Cusanus and Nishida Kitarō.Marcello Ghilardi - 2008 - In James W. Heisig & Mayuko Uehara (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Origins and Possibilities. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 140-154.
  10. Subjectivity, Rinrigaku, and Moral Metaphysics: Watsuji Tetsurō and Mou Zongsan.Wing Keung Lam - 2008 - In Victor Sōgen Hori & Melissa Anne-Marie Curley (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 129-144.
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  11. Guiding Principles of Interpretation in Watsuji Tetsurō’s History of Japanese Ethical Thought: With Particular Reference to the Tension Between the Sonnō and Bushidō Traditions.David A. Dilworth - 2008 - In Victor Sōgen Hori & Melissa Anne-Marie Curley (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 101-112.
  12. Watsuji Tetsurō’s Ethics of Milieu.Pauline Coteau - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 269-290.
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  13. Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook.James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John C. Maraldo - 2011 - University of Hawaiʻi Press.
  14. Body-Mind and Buddha Nature: Dōgen’s Deeper Ecology.Parkes Graham - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 122-€“147.
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  15. Fūdo as the Disclosure of Nature: Rereading Watsuji with Heidegger.David W. Johnson - 2016 - In Takeshi Morisato (ed.), Critical Perspectives on Japanese Philosophy. Chisokudo Publications & Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. pp. 299-326.
  16. Homo Naturalis: Andō Shōeki’s Understanding of the Human Being.Roman Paşca - 2016 - In Takeshi Morisato (ed.), Critical Perspectives on Japanese Philosophy. Chisokudo Publications & Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. pp. 78-99.
  17. Review of Erfahrungen des ki. Leibessphäre, Atmosphäre, Pansphäre. [REVIEW]Leon Krings - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:333-336.
  18. Review of 『ブッディスト・エコロジー:共生・環境・いのちの思想学』. [REVIEW]Yū Inutsuka - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:327-329.
  19. Le statut du végétal dans Fūdo de Watsuji.Quentin Hiernaux - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:159-177.
    Apres avoir introduit les concepts de base de Fūdo, je propose une interpretation du texte problematisee autour du statut de la vegetation. Il s’agira de montrer pourquoi et comment la place que tient la vegetation joue un role mediateur fondamental en tant que principe de premiere importance, y compris et surtout ici pour la vie humaine decrite par Watsuji. Ce faisant, l’objectif est double. D’une part, montrer, a la suite d’Augustin Berque, la coherence de la visee mesologique initiale de l’auteur (...)
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  20. Watsuji’s Ethics From the Perspective of Kata as a Technology of the Self.Jordančo Sekulovski - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:199-208.
    This paper investigates the history of systems of thought different from those of the West. A closer look at Japan’s long philosophical tradition draws attention to the presence of uniquely designed acculturation and training techniques designed as kata or shikata, shedding light on kata as a generic technique of self-perfection and self-transformation. By seeing kata as foundational to the Japanese mind and comparing it to Michel Foucault’s research on technologies of the self, the groundwork is laid for a comparative analysis (...)
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  21. The Aesthetization of Nature: How Buddhist is the Japanese Idea of 'Nature'?Marzenna Jakubczak - 2012 - In Krystyna Wilkoszews (ed.), Aesthetics and Cultures. Kraków, Poland: Universitas. pp. 131-142.
  22. Educational Reform for Immigrant Youth in Japan.J. A. Gordon - unknown
    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.Transnational migration is seldom associated with Japan even though Japan has been dependent on immigrants for several generations. The research presented in this article explores a reform effort viewed as radical within the Japanese context that took place in a metropolitan school known for having one of the largest number of immigrant students in Japan, most of whom hail from Latin America, Southeast Asia, and China. While many of these “Newcomers” are of Japanese ancestry, absence (...)
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  23. Ecological Imagination In Moral Education, East And West.Steven Fesmire - 2011 - Annales Philosophici 2:20-34.
    Relational philosophies developed in classical American pragmatism and the Kyoto School of modern Japanese philosophy suggest aims for greater ecological responsiveness in moral education. To better guide education, we need to know how ecological perception becomes relevant to our deliberations. Our deliberations enlist imagination of a specifically ecological sort when the imaginative structures we use to understand ecosystemic relationships shape our mental simulations and rehearsals. Enriched through crosscultural dialogue, a finely aware ecological imagination can make the deliberations of the coming (...)
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  24. Review of Sourcebook for Modern Japanese Philosophy: Selected Documents by David A. Dilworth; Valdo H. Viglielmo; Agustin Jacinto Zavala. [REVIEW]Steven Heine - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):311-312.
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  25. Extortion Japanese Style.Tina Haida - 1998 - Business Ethics 7 (1):2-6.
    The emerging influence wielded on Japanese businesses by the sokaiya, or extortioners, raises issues not just of bribery but more fundamentally of corporate governance and transparency in the conduct of business. “If it were true that the Japanese companies in question were otherwise conducting their businesses in perfectly ethical ways, then sokaiya would not have any leverage”. The author has completed the first year of her MBA at London Business School after previously working with the Japanese Delegation to the OECD.
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  26. Moral Education in Japan.Klaus Luhmer - 1990 - Journal of Moral Education 19 (3):172-181.
    In spite of the officially secular character of public institutional life, including education, religion is a pervasive undercurrent which affects moral education, both at home and in school. In different ways Buddhism, Shinto, Confucian traditions and new religious movements are all influential. The nationalist emphasis, which became prominent in the period 1872-1945, was replaced by a deliberately secular social studies or citizenship in keeping with the spirit of the war settlement. Latterly patriotic features have been re-introduced alongside a stated priority (...)
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  27. The Japanese Concept of Nature in Relation to the Environmental Ethics and Conservation Aesthetics of Aldo Leopold.Steve Odin - 1991 - Environmental Ethics 13 (4):345-360.
    I focus on the religio-aesthetic concept of nature in Japanese Buddhism as a valuable complement to environmental philosophy in the West and develop an explicit comparison of the Japanese Buddhist concept of nature and the ecological world view of Aldo Leopold. I discuss the profound current of ecological thought running through the Kegon, Tendai, Shingon, Zen, Pure Land, and Nichiren Buddhist traditions as weIl as modem Japanese philosophy as represented by Nishida Kitarö and Watsuji Tetsurö. In this context, I present (...)
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  28. Dōgen, Deep Ecology, and the Ecological Self.Deane Curtin - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):195-213.
    A core project for deep ecologists is the reformulation of the concept of self. In searching for a more inclusive understanding of self, deep ecologists often look to Buddhist philosophy, and to the Japanese Buddhist philosopher Dōgen in particular, for inspiration. I argue that, while Dōgen does share a nondualist, nonanthropocentric framework with deep ecology, his phenomenology of the self is fundamentally at odds with the expanded Self found in the deep ecology literature. I suggest, though I do not fully (...)
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  29. Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan.Tetsuro Watsuji - 1996
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  30. Encounter with Enlightenment. A Study of Japanese Ethics.Robert E. Carter - 2001 - Albany: State University of New York Press.
    Encounter With Enlightenment: A Study of Japanese Ethics -/- This study attempts to lay out some of the main influences in the development of ethical sensitivities in Japan. Daoism, Shintoism, Confucianism, Buddhism and Zen Buddhism all play a role. There are also individual thinkers who have made significant contributions to the way the Japanese think about ethics: Dogen, Shinran, Rikyu, Nishida Kitaro, Nishitani Keiji, Watsuji Tetsuro and many others. But ethics in Japan is, more often than not, taught through practice: (...)
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  31. Ethics Embodied: Rethinking Selfhood Through Continental, Japanese, and Feminist Philosophies. [REVIEW]Leah Kalmanson - 2013 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (1):137-142.
  32. The Buddhist Roots of Watsuji Tetsurô's Ethics of Emptiness.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):606-635.
    Watsuji Tetsurô is famous for having constructed a systematic socio-political ethics on the basis of the idea of emptiness. This essay examines his 1938 essay “The Concept of ‘Dharma’ and the Dialectics of Emptiness in Buddhist Philosophy” and the posthumously published The History of Buddhist Ethical Thought, in order to clarify the Buddhist roots of his ethics. It aims to answer two main questions which are fundamentally linked: “Which way does Watsuji's legacy turn: toward totalitarianism or toward a balanced theory (...)
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  33. Japanese Archery: Zen in Action.Chauncey S. Goodrich, André Sollier, Zsolt Györbiró, Andre Sollier & Zsolt Gyorbiro - 1971 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 91 (4):518.
  34. Notes on the Japanese Kinship System.Robert F. Spencer & Kanmo Imamura - 1950 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 70 (3):165.
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  35. Watsuji’s Topology of the Self.David W. Johnson - 2016 - Asian Philosophy 26 (3):216-240.
    ABSTRACTThis essay critically develops Watsuji’s nondual ontology of the self through the lens of ‘topological’ thought. Through close description of the embeddedness of the self in, and its emergence from, an intersubjective space which, in turn, is rooted in a particular place, Watsuji shows that the self is constituted by its relational contact with others, on the one hand, and by its immersion in a wider geo-cultural environment, on the other. Yet Watsuji himself had difficulty in smoothly bringing together and (...)
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  36. Japanese Frames of Mind: Cultural Perspectives on Human Development.Hidetada Shimizu & Robert A. LeVine (eds.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Japanese Frames of Mind addresses two main questions in light of a collection of research conducted by both Japanese and American researchers at Harvard University: What challenge does Japanese psychology offer to Western psychology? Will the presumed universals of human nature discovered by Western psychology be reduced to a set of 'local psychology' among many in a world of unpredicted variations? The chapters provide a wealth of new data and perspectives related to aspects of Japanese child development, moral reasoning and (...)
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  37. Review Of: Fernando M. Basabe, Religion in the Japanese Textbooks, Vol. 1: Ethics and Society. [REVIEW]Yoshiaki Iisaka - 1975 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 2.
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  38. Review Of: Sébastien Penmellen Boret, Japanese Tree Burial: Ecology, Kinship and the Culture of Death. [REVIEW]Aike P. Rots - 2015 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 42 (2).
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  39. Sacred Forests, Sacred Nation: The Shinto Environmentalist Paradigm and the Rediscovery of Chinju No Mori.Aike Rots - 2015 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 42 (2).
  40. Business Ethics: A Japanese View.Iwao Taka - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (1):53-78.
    Although “fairness” and “social responsibilities” form part of the business ethics agenda of Japanese corporations, the meaning of these terms must be understood in the context of the distinctive Japanese approach to ethics. In Japan, ethics is inextricably bound up with religious dimension and social dimension. The normative environments, influenced by Confucianism, Buddhism, and other traditional and modern Japanese religions, emphasize that not only individuals but also groups have their own spirit which is connected to the ultimate reality. The framework (...)
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  41. Takeda Hiromiti and Abe Keigo. Ronrigaku Nyûmon. Ronrigaku to Ronrizan. Minerva, Kyoto 1949, Iv + 172 Pp. [REVIEW]Takeo Sugihara - 1954 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 19 (2):148-148.
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  42. Kyoto and the Ethics of Flexibility.F. W. J. Keulartz - unknown
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  43. William James and Kitaro Nishida on “Pure Experience”, Consciousness, and Moral Psychology.Joel Krueger - 2007 - Dissertation, Purdue University
    The question “What is the nature of experience?” is of perennial philosophical concern. It deals not only with the nature of experience qua experience, but additionally with related questions about the experiencing subject and that which is experienced. In other words, to speak of the philosophical problem of experience, one must also address questions about mind, world, and the various relations that link them together. Both William James and Kitarō Nishida were deeply concerned with these issues. Their shared notion of (...)
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  44. Time for Ethics: Temporality and the Ethical Ideal in Emmanuel Levinas and Kuki Shūzō.Graham Mayeda - 2012 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):105-124.
    In this article, I compare and contrast the phenomenological ethics of Emmanuel Levinas with that of twentieth-century Japanese philosopher, Kuki Shūzō. In the resulting counterpoint, I put special emphasis on the conception of time espoused by each author. I argue that both go astray by mistakenly basing their ethics on the complete otherness of the other (diachrony) rather than recognizing that both the other (diachrony) and I (synchrony) are originally inseparable in experience before the conceptual separation of “me” and “you.” (...)
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  45. Socially Responsible Investment in Japan: Its Mechanism and Drivers.Kyoko Sakuma & Céline Louche - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):425-448.
    The paper explores the emergence and development of socially responsible investment (SRI) in Japan. SRI is a recent field in Japan. It is not clear which model it will follow: the European, American or its own model. Through the analysis of the historical roots of SRI, the key actors and motivations that have contributed to its diffusion, the paper provides explorative grounds to sketch the translation mechanisms of SRI in Japan and offers insight into its future path. Based on primary (...)
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  46. “Karoshi ” in Japan.Atsuko Kanai - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S2):209-216.
    Since the collapse of Japan's bubble economy in the early 1990' s, the Japanese economy has only recovered slightly. This has direct implications for employment. Both the seniority wage system and the lifetime employment system, which were popular during the period of economic growth in Japan, unavoidably changed to an outcome-wage system. Now there is greater mobility in employment, increased use of nonregular employees, and diversed working patterns. The problem of karoshi – a potentially fatal syndrome resulting from long work (...)
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  47. Consumer Ethics in Japan: An Economic Reconstruction of Moral Agency of Japanese Firms – Qualitative Insights From Grocery/Retail Markets.Sigmund Wagner-Tsukamoto - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):29-44.
    The article reconstructs, in economic terms, managerial business ethics perceptions in the Japanese consumer market for fast-moving daily consumption products. An economic, three-level model of moral agency was applied that distinguishes unintentional moral agency, passive intentional moral agency and active intentional moral agency. The study took a qualitative approach and utilized as empirical research design an interview procedure. The study found that moral agency of Japanese firms mostly extended up to unintentional and intentional passive moral agency. Certain myopic managerial views (...)
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  48. The International Business Ethics Index: Japan.John Tsalikis & Bruce Seaton - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):379-385.
    The Business Ethics Index (BEI) was expanded in Japan. The overall BEI for Japan stands at 99.1 – slightly on the negative side. The component BEI patterns were similar to those in the U.S. In an open-ended question about their ethical experiences as consumers, the Japanese were concerned about customer service and good management practices.
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  49. Does Religion Matter? A Comparison Study of the Ethical Beliefs of Marketing Students of Religious and Secular Universities in Japan.Mohammed Y. A. Rawwas, Ziad Swaidan & Jamal Al-Khatib - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 65 (1):69-86.
    This study was designed to examine the determinants of and differences between the ethical beliefs of two groups of Japanese students in religious and secular universities. Multiple regression analysis revealed that students of the Japanese religious university perceived that young, male, relativistic, and opportunistic students tended to behave less ethically than did older, female, and idealistic students. Students of the Japanese secular university perceived that male, achievement-oriented, and opportunistic students tended to behave less ethically than did female and experience-oriented students. (...)
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  50. The Japanese Preschool's Pedagogy of Peripheral Participation.Akiko Hayashi & Joseph Tobin - 2011 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 39 (2):139-164.
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