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  1. The Anonymous Subject of Life—Some Philosophical, Psychological, and Religious Considerations.David W. Johnson - 2019 - Research in Phenomenology 49 (3):385-402.
    This paper focuses on one of the mainstays of Japanese psychiatrist and philosopher Kimura Bin’s (1931–2021) philosophical approach. Kimura’s work is characterized by the intersection of therapeutic, philosophical, and intercultural dimensions in ways that enable his clinical practice and philosophical investigations to mutually inform one another. I examine how this dialectic comes together with his conversion of ordinary Japanese words into philosophical concepts. Explicating the concepts Kimura deploys in developing a phenomenology of the self allows us to make new sense (...)
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  2. Faith and reason in continental and Japanese philosophy: reading Tanabe Hajime and William Desmond.Takeshi Morisato - 2019 - New York, NY: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This book brings together the work of two significant figures in contemporary philosophy. By considering the work of Tanabe Hajime, the Japanese philosopher of the Kyoto School, and William Desmond, the contemporary Irish philosopher, Takeshi Morisato offers a clear presentation of contemporary comparative solutions to the problems of the philosophy of religion. Importantly, this is the first book-length English-language study of Tanabe Hajime's philosophy of religion that consults the original Japanese texts. Considering the examples of Christianity and Buddhism, Faith and (...)
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  3. Nishida Kitarō’s chiasmatic chorology: place of dialectic: dialectic of place. [REVIEW]Elizabeth McManaman Grosz - 2018 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 10 (2):191-193.
  4. Philosophy live: a perspective from Japan.Fumihiko Sueki - 2018 - Kyoto: International Research Center for Japanese Studies.
  5. Is Western Marxism Western? The Cases of Gramsci and Tosaka.Takahiro Chino - 2017 - Journal of World Philosophies 2 (1):28-41.
    This paper aims to show that two eminent Marxists in the 1930s, the Italian Antonio Gramsci and the Japanese Tosaka Jun, shared three important characteristics of so-called Western Marxism: the methodological development of Marxism, the focus on the superstructure, and the pessimism about the impossibility of immediate revolution. Showing that Gramsci and Tosaka shared these characteristics enables us to revisit the framework of “Western Marxism,” which confusingly consists of both theoretical characteristics and geographical criteria. Looking at Gramsci and Tosaka on (...)
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  6. Fukuoka Shin'ichi, Nishida tetsugaku o yomu: seimei o meguru shisaku no tabi: dōteki heikō to zettai mujunteki jiko dōitsu.Yoshiaki Ikeda - 2017 - Tōkyō: Akashi Shoten. Edited by Shin'ichi Fukuoka.
    生物学者と哲学者が西田哲学を共通項に生命について徹底的に考え抜く。時間論を経て知の統合に向かう碩学2人による記念碑的対話。.
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  7. Acting-Intuition and the Achievement of Perception: Merleau-Ponty with Nishida.David W. Johnson - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):693-709.
    This essay draws on Nishida’s ontology to shed light on some problems with Merleau-Ponty’s view of truth, a view that has difficulty accounting for the expression in language of that which is distorted, mistaken, or untruthful. To get past these difficulties, it is suggested that we turn to the more dynamic and developmental vision of the continuity of being found in Nishida’s work.
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  8. On (the) nothing: Heidegger and Nishida.John W. M. Krummel - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):239-268.
    Two major twentieth century philosophers, of East and West, for whom the nothing is a significant concept are Nishida Kitarō and Martin Heidegger. Nishida’s basic concept is the absolute nothing upon which the being of all is predicated. Heidegger, on the other hand, thematizes the nothing as the ulterior aspect of being. Both are responding to Western metaphysics that tends to substantialize being and dichotomize the real. Ironically, however, while Nishida regarded Heidegger as still trapped within the confines of Western (...)
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  9. Autoéveil: Le système des universels.Kitaro Nishida & Tremblay Jacynthe - 2017 - Chisokudo Publications.
    Autoéveil. Le Système des universels (janvier 1930) est un livre essentiel pour comprendre la logique de Nishida Kitaro (1870-1945). Comme son titre l’indique, il est centré sur la série d’universels qui composent le système de pensée de celui qui est considéré comme le philosophe japonais le plus important du 20e siècle, de même que sur le thème de l’autoéveil qui marque, à des degrés divers, chacun de ces universels.
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  10. Sacred Appellations: Secular Zen, New Materialism, and D. T. Suzuki’s Soku-hi Logic.Rossa Ó Muireartaigh - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:69-83.
    The logic of soku-hi is presented as an articulation of a post-Kantian view of reality that embraces the truths of science with the assumption of the transcendental subject. As such, soku-hi represents the philosophical posture of both the secular Zen of the Kyoto School and the new materialists of contemporary continental philosophy. It describes how material reality is not all even though there is nothing else.
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  11. Der Form des Formlosen Auf der Spur: Sprache Und Denken Bei Nishida.Jan Gerrit Strala - 2017 - Chisokudo Publications.
    Nishidas Philosophie zeigt sich durch seine Sprachform als eine sich selbst umformende und sich dabei selbst erweiternde und ausdehnende Form des Denkens, die jedoch in ihrem Kern ein gleichbleibendes Fundament zu haben scheint. Man kann hinsichtlich dieses Fundaments oder Ursprungs sagen, dass sich die Themen seiner Philosophie zwar seit der Studie über das Gute gewandelt haben, der Ausgangspunkt seines Denkens und das, was im Grunde seines Philosophierens zur Sprache kommen will, jedoch unverändert aktuell geblieben sind. Gewandelt haben sich lediglich die (...)
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  12. Ontology or Ethics: The Case of Martin Heidegger and Watsuji Tetsurô.Kelly Louise Rexzy P. Agra - 2016 - Kritike 10 (1):163-191.
    The title of this paper namely ‘Ontology or Ethics: The Case of Martin Heidegger and Watsuji Tetsurô,’ in principle, if not in fact, aims at shedding light on the relation between ethics and ontology. As a thesis, this paper claims that their relation boils down to the question of the being of the human being, which consequently and necessarily serves as the departure point towards answering the problems of ontology and ethics. In trying to divulge the presuppositions underlying this claim, (...)
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  13. La filosofía japonesa en sus textos.Raquel Bouso, James Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John Maraldo (eds.) - 2016 - Barcelona, España: Herder.
  14. Hiromatsu on Mach’s Philosophy and Relativity Theory.Makoto Katsumori - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:149-188.
    In his project of going beyond the “modern worldview,” Hiromatsu Wataru attached great importance to Ernst Mach’s philosophical thought and Einstein’s theory of relativity as challenging the premises of modern philosophy, which he characterized as substantialist and bound by the subject / object schema. This paper surveys Hiromatsu’s analysis of Mach’s phenomenalist element-monism, specifically his critique of Mach’s insufficient break with modern philosophy; his inquiry into Einstein’s relativity theory with a focus on its intersubjective cognitive structure; and the way he (...)
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  15. Chōra in Heidegger and Nishida.John W. M. Krummel - 2016 - Studia Phaenomenologica 16:489-518.
    In this article I discuss how the Greek concept of chōra inspired both Martin Heidegger and Nishida Kitarō. Not only was Plato’s concept an important source, but we can also draw connections to the pre-Platonic understanding of the term as well. I argue that chōra in general entails concretion-cum-indetermination, a space that implaces human existence into its environment and clears room for the presencing-absencing of beings. One aim is to convince Nishida scholars of the significance of chōra in Nishida’s thought (...)
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  16. Introduction to Miki Kiyoshi and his "Logic of the Imagination".John W. M. Krummel - 2016 - Social Imaginaries 2 (1):13-24.
    This is an introduction to Miki Kiyoshi and his philosophy of the imagination and to the translation of the first chapter of his Logic of Imagination, "Myth," published in the same issue of the journal.
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  17. La mediación absoluta y el camino: de la transformación religiosa en Tanabe Hajime.Rebeca Maldonado - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:107-124.
    This essay deals with the problem of religious transformation in Tanabe Hajime. In his Philosophy as Metanoetics, Tanabe examines this transformation through the relationship between vows of the Buddhas as described in the writings of the Pure Land Buddhist thinker Shinran. For Tanabe, each vow expresses a moment of the religious transformation. Furthermore,he argues against all possibility of immediacy in human existence and sets out to demonstrate that the meaning of existence is mediated by the transformation of self-power into Other-power, (...)
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  18. Review of 偶然と運命 : 九鬼周造の倫理学. [REVIEW]Takeshi Morisato - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:365-368.
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  19. Homo Naturalis: Andō Shōeki’s Understanding of the Human Being.Roman Paşca - 2016 - In Takeshi Morisato (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 8: Critical Perspectives on Japanese Philosophy. Nagoya: Chisokudo Publications. pp. 78-99.
  20. The "Place of Nothing" in Nishida as Chiasma and Chōra.John Krummel - 2015 - Diaphany 1 (1):203-240.
    The paper will explicate the Sache or matter of the dialectic of the founder of Kyoto School philosophy, Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945), from the standpoint of his mature thought, especially from the 1930s and 40s. Rather than providing a simple exposition of his thought I will engage in a creative reading of his concept of basho (place) in terms of chiasma and chōra, or a chiasmatic chōra. I argue that Nishida’s appropriation of nineteenth century German, especially Hegelian, terminology was inadequate in (...)
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  21. Embodied Implacement in Kūkai and Nishida.John W. M. Krummel - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (3):786-808.
    Two Japanese philosophers not often read together but both with valuable insights concerning body and place are Kūkai 空海, the founder of Shingon 真言 Buddhism, and Nishida Kitarō 西田幾多郎, the founder of Kyoto School philosophy. This essay will examine the importance of embodied implacement in correlativity with the environment in the philosophies of these two preeminent intellects of Japan. One was a medieval religionist and the other a modern philosopher, and yet similarities inherited from Mahāyāna Buddhism are to be found (...)
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  22. Nishida Kitarō's Chiasmatic Chorology: Place of Dialectic, Dialectic of Place.John Wesley Megumu Krummel - 2015 - Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
    Nishida Kitarō is considered Japan's first and greatest modern philosopher. As founder of the Kyoto School, he began a rigorous philosophical engagement and dialogue with Western philosophical traditions, especially the work of G. W. F. Hegel. John W. M. Krummel explores the Buddhist roots of Nishida’s thought and places him in connection with Hegel and other philosophers of the Continental tradition. Krummel develops notions of self-awareness, will, being, place, the environment, religion, and politics in Nishida’s thought and shows how his (...)
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  23. Manga and Philosophy: Why Was the Book “Manga Introduction to Philosophy” Written?Masahiro Morioka - 2015 - The Review of Life Studies 6:1-28.
    Slightly modified PowerPoint slides in the PDF format presented at the first conference of the European Network of Japanese Philosophy, Barcelona, Spain. (December 4th, 2015).
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  24. Kami to hito to shisha.Susumu Togashi (ed.) - 2015 - Tōkyō: Iwata Shoin.
  25. Perception, Expression, and the Continuity of Being: Some Intersections between Nishida and Gadamer.David W. Johnson - 2014 - Asian Philosophy 24 (1):48-66.
    Gadamer’s notion of dialogical truth relies on the claim that self and world “belong together” as aspects of a single, unitary phenomenon, one which is made manifest in language. This view has difficulty, however, accounting for that which is untruthful. To get past this obstacle I suggest that we turn to Nishida’s work, which shows how we can bring self and world together into a kind of harmony such that the cultivation of perception makes possible truthful expression.
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  26. Anontology and the Issue of Being and Nothing in Nishida Kitarō.John Krummel - 2014 - In JeeLoo Liu & Douglas L. Berger (eds.), Nothingness in Asian Philosophy. New York: Routledge. pp. 263-283.
    This chapter will explicate what Nishida means by “nothing” (mu, 無), as well as “being” (yū, 有), through an exposition of his concept of the “place of nothing” (mu no basho). We do so through an investigation of his exposition of “the place of nothing” vis-àvis the self, the world, and God, as it shows up in his epistemology, metaphysics, theology and religious ethics during the various periods of his oeuvre – in other words, his understanding of nothingness that he (...)
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  27. World, Nothing, and Globalization in Nishida and Nancy.John Krummel - 2014 - In Leah Kalmanson & James Mark Shields (eds.), Buddhist Responses to Globalization. Lexington Books. pp. 107-129.
    The “shrinking” of the globe in the last few centuries has made explicit that the world is a tense unity of many: the many worlds are forced to contend with one another. Nishida Kitarō, the founder of the Kyoto school, once stated that to be is to be implaced. We exist by partaking in “the socio-historical world.” More recently, Jean-luc Nancy has conceived of the world in terms of sense. What is striking in both is that the world emerges out (...)
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  28. The Place of God in Philosophy of Nishida Kitaro.Mohammad Asghari - 2013 - پژوهشنامه فلسفه دین 11 (1):135-149.
    This article tries to show the place of God in philosophy of Nishida Kitaro. Thus, religious aspect of philosophical thought of Nishida has been considered in four themes, namely, God as the ground of reality, absolute nothingness, divine love, and religion. Nishida interprets God in mystical vocabulary which it is similar to theory of pantheism. He explains relation between God and the creatures as manifestation of God. For him, God is the ground of reality and according this opinion, there is (...)
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  29. Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Deductive Reasoning: The Relation of the Universal and the Particular in Early Works of Tanabe Hajime.Timothy Burns & Tanabe Hajime - 2013 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (2):124-149.
    This article introduces the first English translation of one of Tanabe’s early essays on metaphysics. It questions the relation of the universal to the particular in context of logic, phenomenology, Neo-Kantian epistemology, and classical metaphysics. Tanabe provides his reflections on the nature of the concept of universality and its constitutive relation to phenomenal particulars through critical analyses of the issue as it is discussed across various schools of philosophy including: British Empiricism, the Marburg School, the Austrian School, the Kyoto School, (...)
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  30. Japanese Postmodern Philosophy’s Turn to Historicity.Shaoyang Lin - 2013 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (1):111-135.
    In this paper, I will outline and categorize the history of postmodern­ism in the Japanese context. I will also critically analyze its changes from the perspective of postwar Japanese intellectual history as well as the postwar history of Japanese political philosophy. I will position this new intellectual and philosophical tendency, which has been around for nearly forty years since the late 1970s, in a global context, and I will especially position it within an East Asian perspective, which from my point (...)
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  31. Nishida Kitarō to shūkyō.Hiroji Oka - 2013 - Tōkyō: Puneumasha.
    西田哲学と語りえぬもの──その独創的な言語と思考の運動の、秘められた可能性の中心とは何か。西田と対話し続けた半生の記録。.
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  32. Postures et Pratiques de L'homme: Libéralisme, philosophie non-standard et pensée japonaise.Jordanco Sekulovski - 2013 - Paris, France: L'Harmattan.
    POSTURES ET PRATIQUES DE L'HOMME Libéralisme, philosophie non-standard et pensée japonaise Jordanco SEKULOVSKI Nous, les sans-philosophie ASIE Japon -/- La philosophie véhicule des distinctions dualistes dont la conflictualité affaiblit gravement notre sentiment de solidarité humaine ; affronter la philosophie sur son propre terrain mène à une impasse, toute objection à son règne métaphysique devant, pour être reçue, se formuler dans les termes mêmes de la métaphysique... Il s'agit donc de changer de terrain, ou de chemin... L'auteur s'appuie sur le kâta (...)
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  33. Christianity and the Notion of Nothingness: Contributions to Buddhist-Christian Dialogue From the Kyoto School.Martin Repp & Jan van Bragt (eds.) - 2012 - Brill.
    The Christian philosopher Muto Kazuo contributed substantially to the predominantly Buddhist “Kyoto School of Philosophy.” Through critical exchange with its representatives, he opened up new perceptions of Christian faith, enabled mutual understanding between Buddhism and Christianity, and challenged the Western dialectical method.
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  34. Nihonjin no tetsugaku.Koyata Washida - 2012 - Tōkyō: Genshisha.
    鷲田小彌太の主著たる大作! やせ細った「哲学像」からの脱却! 日本の歴史はほとんどの時代で偉大な哲学者を有している。存在論、認識論、人生論の三位一体をめざす。狭義の哲学が無視してきた人生論に光を当てる。現代から古代へ、時代を逆順に進むスタイル。誰にでも理解でき、 利用できる思考の具体例で構成。.
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  35. On buddhistic ontology: A comparative study of Mou zongsan and kyoto school philosophy.Tomomi Asakura - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (4):647-678.
    Mou Zongsan's notion of "Buddhistic ontology" is interpreted here in its fundamental difference from his own previous metaphysical scheme, in the light of the Kyoto School philosophers' similar attempts to resolve the Kantian antinomy of practical reason. This is an alternative both to the analysis provided by previous interpreters of Mou's Buddhistic philosophy, such as Hans-Rudolf Kantor and N. Serina Chan, and to the comparative studies of Mou's theories with Kyoto School philosophy by Ng Yu-kwan. Previous researchers considered Mou's Buddhist (...)
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  36. Place and Dialectic: Two Essays by Nishida Kitaro.W. M. Krummel John & Nagatomo Shigenori (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This book presents two essays by Nishida Kitaro, translated into English for the first time by John Krummel and Shigenori Nagatomo. Nishida is widely regarded as one of the father figures of modern Japanese philosophy and as the founder of the first distinctly Japanese school of philosophy, the Kyoto school, known for its synthesis of western philosophy, Christian theology, and Buddhist thought. The two essays included here are ''Basho'' from 1926/27 and ''Logic and Life'' from 1936/37. Each essay is divided (...)
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  37. Place and Dialectic: Two Essays by Kitarō Nishida ; Translated by John W.M. Krummel and Shigenori Nagatomo.Kitarō Nishida - 2011 - Oxford University Press. Edited by Kitarō Nishida, John Wesley Megumu Krummel & Shigenori Nagatomo.
    Place and Dialectic presents two essays by Nishida Kitaro, translated into English for the first time by John W.M. Krummel and Shigenori Nagatomo. Nishida is widely regarded as one of the father figures of modern Japanese philosophy and as the founder of the first distinctly Japanese school of philosophy, the Kyoto school, known for its synthesis of western philosophy, Christian theology, and Buddhist thought. The two essays included here are ''Basho'' from 1926/27 and ''Logic and Life'' from 1936/37. Each essay (...)
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  38. "Mono" no shisō: sono shisō shiteki kōsatsu.Masao Tsuda - 2011 - Kyōto-shi: Bunrikaku.
    「もの」とは何か、自明の基礎語を徹底して批評・解明。「もの」と「自覚」の矛盾・対抗を基本軸にしながら、移動・推移する「情」を普遍的媒介者として新たに位置づけ、日本思想史についての核心的な断面を明らかに した。.
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  39. Izutsu Toshihiko: eichi no tetsugaku.Eisuke Wakamatsu - 2011 - Tōkyō: Keiō Gijuku Daigaku Shuppankai.
  40. Tetsugakusuru Nihon.Tetsuji Yamamoto - 2011 - Tōkyō-to Minato-ku: Bunka Kagaku Kōtō Kenkyūin Shuppankyoku.
    1. Tetsugaku jiban no ten'i : hi bunri jutsugosei basho hi jiko --.
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  41. Exploring space consciousness other dissociative experiences: a Japanese perspective.Ornella Corazza - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (7-8):7-8.
    The field of consciousness studies has long benefitted from the investigation of non- ordinary states of consciousness, both spontaneous and facilitated by mind-altering agents. In the present study, I look at the implications of spontaneous near-death experiences and experiences facilitated by the dissociative anaesthetic ketamine. These experiences reputedly have similar phenomenologies, such as a feeling of dying, motion through darkness, entering another realm, visions of light, and a sense of separation from the physical body. To assess whether ketamine and near-death (...)
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  42. The Originary Wherein: Heidegger and Nishida on the Sacred and the Religious.John W. M. Krummel - 2010 - Research in Phenomenology 40 (3):378-407.
    In this paper, I explore a possible convergence between two great twentieth century thinkers, Nishida Kitarō of Japan and Martin Heidegger of Germany. The focus is on the quasi-religious language they employ in discussing the grounding of human existence in terms of an encompassing Wherein for our being. Heidegger speaks of “the sacred” and “the passing of the last god” that mark an empty clearing wherein all metaphysical absolutes or gods have withdrawn but are simultaneously indicative of an opening wherein (...)
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  43. Japanese Provides a New Relation between Language and the Real World.Sachiko Yamahashi - 2010 - Kagaku Tetsugaku 43 (1):15-29.
  44. William James and Kitaro Nishida on “Pure Experience”, Consciousness, and Moral Psychology.Joel Krueger - 2007 - Dissertation, Purdue University
    The question “What is the nature of experience?” is of perennial philosophical concern. It deals not only with the nature of experience qua experience, but additionally with related questions about the experiencing subject and that which is experienced. In other words, to speak of the philosophical problem of experience, one must also address questions about mind, world, and the various relations that link them together. Both William James and Kitarō Nishida were deeply concerned with these issues. Their shared notion of (...)
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  45. The Varieties of Pure Experience: William James and Kitaro Nishida on Consciousness and Embodiment.Joel Krueger - 2006 - William James Studies 1.
  46. ‏زندگى‌نامه و خدمات علمى و فرهنگى پروفسور توشى‌هيکو ايزوتسو: ‏Biography & academic life of Toshihiko Izutsu /‏.Umīd Qanbarī (ed.) - 2006 - Tihrān: Anjuman-i Ās̲ār va Mafākhir-i Farhangī.
  47. Image-Thinking and the Understanding of Being: The Psychological Basis of Linguistic Expression.Shigenori Nagatomo, Yuasa Yasuo & Jacques Fasan - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):179-208.
    This essay investigates why and how East Asian thought, particularly Chinese thought, has traditionally developed differently from that of Western philosophy by examining the linguistic differences discerned in the Chinese language and Western languages. To accomplish this taks, it focuses on the understanding of "being" that relates to the theoretical thinking of the West and the image- thinking of East Asia, while providing a psychological basis for the latter.
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  48. On the way to a “common” language? Heidegger’s dialogue with a Japanese visitor.Zhang Wei - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (2):283-297.
  49. Teikoku no keijijōgaku: Miki Kiyoshi no rekishi tetsugaku.Tetsuo Machiguchi - 2004 - Tōkyō: Sakuhinsha.
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  50. On japanese things and words: An answer to Heidegger's question.Michael F. Marra - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (4):555-568.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:On Japanese Things and Words:An Answer to Heidegger's QuestionMichael F. MarraIt has been over thirty years since my high school teacher of philosophy, Professor Dino Dezzani, recommended a book from which to begin my study of philosophy: Martin Heidegger's (1889-1976) Unterwegs zur Sprache (On the way to language [1959]). Evidently he was aware of my interest in literature and thought that Heidegger's discussion of words, things, and poetic language (...)
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