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  1. Review Of: Sakai Naoki 酒井直樹 and Isomae Jun'ichi 磯前順一, Eds., Overcoming Modernity and the Kyoto School: Modernity, Empire, and Universality [[近代の超克] と京都学派—近代性, 帝国, 普遍性]. [REVIEW]Michiko Yusa - 2012 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 39 (2):391-394.
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  2. "Kindai No Chōkoku" to Kyōto Gakuha: Kindaisei, Teikoku, Fuhensei = "Overcoming Modernity" and the Kyoto School: Modernity, Empire, and Universality.Naoki Sakai & Jun'ichi Isomae (eds.) - 2010 - Ningen Bunka Kenkyū Kikō Kokusai Nihon Bunka Kenkyū Sentā.
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  3. Yuasa, Yasuo, Overcoming Modernity: Synchronicity and Image-Thinking, Translated by Shigenori Nagatomo and John Krummel: Albany: SUNY Press, 2008, 247 Pages.Xiaofei Tu - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):371-373.
  4. Hiromatsu Wataru, Kindai No Chōkoku.Toshiaki Kobayashi - 2007 - Kōdansha.
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  5. Political Philosophy in Japan: Nishida, the Kyoto School and Co-Prosperity.Christopher S. Goto-Jones - 2005 - Routledge.
    Nishida Kitaro, originator of the Kyoto School and 'father of Japanese Philosophy' is usually viewed as an essentially apolitical thinker who underwent a 'turn' in the mid-1930s, becoming an ideologue of Japanese imperialism. Political Philosophy in Japan challenges the view that a neat distinction can be drawn between Nishida's apolitical 'pre-turn' writings and the apparently ideological tracts he produced during the war years. In the context of Japanese intellectual traditions, this book suggests that Nishida was a political thinker form the (...)
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  6. Overcome by Modernity: History, Culture, and Community in Interwar Japan.Yumiko Iida - 2005 - Historical Materialism 13 (1):221-234.
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  7. Self-Overcoming as the Overcoming of Modernity: Watsuji Tetsuro's "a Study of Nietzsche" and its Place in the Development of His Thought.David Baruch Gordon - 1997 - Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
    Watsuji Tetsuro has influenced both intellectuals and educated laypeople in twentieth-century Japan through his many writings on the allegedly unique character of Japanese civilization. His first book, however, explicated the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche as a metaphysics of will to power. This work, which initially appears anomalous, addressed many of Watsuji's early concerns and foreshadowed major themes in his later thought. ;A provincial Confucian upbringing and the early deaths of several relatives left the adolescent Watsuji rebellious and concerned to overcome (...)
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  8. "Kindai No Chåokoku" Ron Shåowa Shisåoshi E No Ichi Shikaku.Wataru Hiromatsu - 1989
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