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  1. The True Self in the Buddhist Philosophy of the Kyoto School.Fritz Buri & Harold H. Oliver - 1992 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 12:83.
  2. Jodo Shinshu: Shin Buddhism in Medieval Japan.Dennis Hirota & James C. Dobbins - 1990 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 10:287.
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  3. Japanese Pure Land Buddhism in Christian America.Carl Becker - 1990 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 10:143.
  4. From Henological Reduction to a Phenomenology of the “Name”: A Reinterpretation of Japanese Pure Land Thought.Shigeru Taguchi - 2009 - In Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 4: Facing the 21st Century. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 51-64.
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  5. Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook.James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John C. Maraldo - 2011 - University of Hawaiʻi Press.
  6. Review of 『ブッディスト・エコロジー:共生・環境・いのちの思想学』. [REVIEW]Yū Inutsuka - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:327-329.
  7. Never Die Alone: Death and Birth in Pure Land Buddhism: Jonathan Watts and Yoshiharu Tomatsu, Editors, 2008, Jodo Shu Press.Ilana Maymind - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):451-455.
    This is a review of a collection of six essays. These essays, with the exception of one, are written by the followers of Shin Buddhism. The last essay in this collection is written from the perspective of Theravada Buddhism rather than Mahayana Buddhism. This collection is a result of the initiative by Rev. Yoshiharu Tomatsu who, as a Buddhist priest, has acquired hands-on experience in dealing with grieving Temple members and became acutely aware of the discrepancy between a medical system (...)
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  8. The Self-Awareness of Evil in Pure Land Buddhism: A Translation of Contemporary Kyoto School Philosopher Keta Masako.Melissa Anne-Marie Curley, Jessica L. Main & Melanie Coughlin - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):192-201.
    Membership in the Kyoto School of philosophy is defined by both formal and conceptual criteria. Keta Masako 氣多雅子 is a member in good standing in both senses. Formally speaking, she currently occupies the Chair in Religious Studies at Kyoto University.1 This chair, together with the Chair in Philosophy, constitutes the formal nexus of the Kyoto School.2 Keta is the first woman to hold the chair, constellating her in a network that radiates “from the rather substantial circle of students and professors (...)
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  9. Review of Sourcebook for Modern Japanese Philosophy: Selected Documents by David A. Dilworth; Valdo H. Viglielmo; Agustin Jacinto Zavala. [REVIEW]Steven Heine - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):311-312.
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  10. Review Of: Michihiro Ama, Immigrants to the Pure Land: The Modernization, Acculturation, and Globalization of Shin Buddhism. [REVIEW]Galen Amstutz - 2011 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 38 (2):392-395.
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  11. Genshi Jōdo Shisō No kenkyūGenshi Jodo Shiso No Kenkyu.Leon Hurvitz, Fujita Kōtatsu & Fujita Kotatsu - 1973 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 93 (1):91.
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  12. Eight Theories of Religion: Ethnicity, Ritual, and Violence in the Japanese Buddhist Tradition.Daniel L. Pals - 2006 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Why do human beings believe in divinities? Why do some seek eternal life, while others seek escape from recurring lives? Why do the beliefs and behaviors we typically call "religious" so deeply affect the human personality and so subtly weave their way through human society? Revised and updated in this second edition, Eight Theories of Religion considers how these fundamental questions have engaged the most important thinkers of the modern era. Accessible, systematic, and succinct, the text examines the classic interpretations (...)
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  13. In Search of the Way: Thought and Religion in Early-Modern Japan, 1582-1860. [REVIEW]Richard Bowring - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In Search of the Way deals with intellectual and religious developments in early-modern Japan. It touches on the fate of Christianity but mainly covers Buddhism, Shinto, and Neo-Confucianism, particularly the latter. Of central concern is the constant debate over how society should be organized and how the individual can achieve self-fulfilment as just one element of a larger whole. It touches on such matters as ritual, pilgrimage, and religion in practice, but the emphasis is on ideological debate, disagreement, and consensus.
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  14. キルケゴールと日本の仏教・哲学.Masaru åotani & Toshikazu åoya - 1992
  15. 日本近世の思想と仏教.Okuwa Hitoshi - 1989 - Kyoto: Hozokan.
  16. Review Of: James C. Dobbins, Jōdo Shinshū: Shin Buddhism in Medieval Japan. [REVIEW]Jan Van Bragt - 1990 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 17 (1):85-89.
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  17. Review Of: Mark L. Blum, The Origins and Development of Pure Land Buddhism: A Study and Translation of Gyōnen’s Jōdo Hōmon Genrushō. [REVIEW]Dennis Hirota - 2003 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 30 (1-2):162-166.
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  18. The Emergence of Orthodoxy: A Historical Study of Heresy in the Early Jodo Shinshu.James Carter Dobbins - 1984 - Dissertation, Yale University
    This study traces the development of orthodoxy in the Jodo Shinshu during its formative period between the twelfth and fifteenth centuries, and examines what impact questions of heresy, both within and outside the Shinshu, had on its early history. The Shinshu has long been one of the largest and most influential schools of Buddhism in Japan. It derived its strength from the great number of common people drawn to its simple doctrine of salvation through faith. The emergence of the Shinshu (...)
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  19. The Religious Philosophy of Tanabe Hajime the Metanoetic Imperative.James W. Heisig, Taitetsu Unno & International Symposium on Metanoetics - 1990
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  20. Åotani Daigaku Kåogi.Keiji Nishitani - 1991
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  21. Tetsugaku Ronshåu.Manshi Kiyozawa & åotani Daigaku - 2003
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  22. Tarikimon Tetsugaku.Manshi Kiyozawa & åotani Daigaku - 2002
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  23. Shin Buddhism.Daisetsu T. Suzuki - 1970 - Philosophy East and West 21 (3):335-337.
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  24. Shin Buddhism. [REVIEW]J. H. P. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (2):347-347.
    The Reverend Hozen Seki, President of the American Buddhist Academy, says in his two-page preface that this book is the result of the transcription of five lectures given by Suzuki in the New York Buddhist Church in 1958. It is a detailing of Suzuki's own personal view of what Shin Buddhism is. This is the system that stems from the Japanese saint Shinran of the thirteenth century who was a follower of Honen, the founder of the Pure Land doctrine in (...)
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  25. Nothingness and Sunyata: A Comparison of Heidegger and Nishitani.Fred Dallmayr - 1992 - Philosophy East and West 42 (1):37-48.
  26. Hisamatsu Sensei's Theory of Zen and Shin Buddhism; Tr by J. Van Bragt East-West Religions Project, Kyoto, Jl 1983, Discussion, Pp 113-122. [REVIEW]Genpo Hoshino - 1989 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 9:101-111.
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  27. The Unfolding of the Lotus: A Survey of Recent Developments in Shin Buddhism in the West.Alfred Bloom - 1990 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 10:157-164.
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  28. World Rejection and Pure Land Buddhism in Japan.Allan A. Andrews - 1977 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 4 (4):251-266.
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  29. Shingon's Kakukai on the Immanence of the Pure Land.Robert E. Morrell - 1984 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 11 (2/3):195-220.
  30. Buddhism and Abortion in Contemporary Japan:" Mizuko Kuyō" and the Confrontation with Death.Bardwell Smith - 1988 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 15 (1):3-24.
  31. Preparing for the Pure Land in Late Tenth-Century Japan.Richard Bowring - 1998 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 25 (3-4):221-257.
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  32. Book Review: Dennis Hirota, Ed., Toward a Contemporary Understanding of Pure Land Buddhism: Creating a Shin Buddhist Theology in a Religiously Plural World. [REVIEW]Jan Van Bragt - 2001 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 28 (1-2):188-192.
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  33. Jōkei and the Rhetoric of “Other Power” and “Easy Practice” in Medieval Japanese Buddhism.James Ford - 2002 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 29 (1-2):67-106.
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  34. Editor's Introduction: Pure Lands in Japanese Religion.Galen Amstutz & Mark L. Blum - 2006 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 33 (2):217-221.
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  35. Tourists in Paradise: Writing the Pure Land in Medieval Japanese Fiction.R. Kimbrough - 2006 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 33 (2):269-296.
  36. Tanabe Hajime and the Hint of A Dharmic Finality.James W. Heisig - 2011 - Comprendre 13 (2):55-69.
    The Japanese philosopher, Tanabe Hajime is taken up as an example of a thinker who, like the conference question, straddles intellectual histories East and West. Of all the Kyoto School philosophers, it was he who took history most seriously. He not only criticized Kantian, Hegelian, and Marxist notions of teleology and the modern scientific myth of "progress" on their own ground, but went on to counter these views of history with a logic of emptiness grounded in Buddhist philosophy. The essay (...)
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  37. Social Behavior and Religious Consciousness Among Shin Buddhist Practitioners.Ugo Dessi - 2010 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37 (2):335-366.
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  38. The Buddha Eye: An Anthology of the Kyoto School and its Contemporaries.Frederick Franck (ed.) - 2004 - World Wisdom.
    Essays on the self -- The structure of reality -- What is Shin Buddhism?
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  39. The Buddha Eye: An Anthology of the Kyoto School.Frederick Franck (ed.) - 1982 - Crossroad.
Hōnen and Shinran
  1. Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, and the Question of Nationalism.Steven Heine, James W. Heisig & John C. Maraldo - 1997 - Philosophy East and West 47 (3):439.
  2. Toward a Global Hermeneutic of Justification in Process Perspective: Luther and Shinran Comparatively Considered.Tokiyuki Nobuhara - 1992 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 12:103.
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  3. Young Man Shinran: A Reappraisal of Shinran's Life.John Yokota - 1990 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 10:285.
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  4. The Monk Who Dared: An Historical Novel About Shinran. [REVIEW]Roger Corless - 1998 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 18:270.
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  5. Faith as Knowledge in the Teaching of Shinran Shonin and Martin Luther.Paul O. Ingram - 1988 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 8:23.
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  6. 5. Shinran’s Compassion and Dōgen’s Compassion.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 61-71.
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  7. The Subject of History in Miki Kiyoshi’s “Shinran”.Melissa Anne-Marie Curley - 2008 - In Victor Sōgen Hori & Melissa Anne-Marie Curley (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 78-93.
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  8. Shinran in the Light of Heidegger: Rethinking the Concept of Shinjin.Dennis Hirota - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 207-€“231.
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  9. In Search of the Absolute: Kuki Shūzō and Shinran.Takako Saitō - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 232-€“246.
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  10. Writing as Participation: Textual Streams and Argumentative Patterns in Shinran’s Kyōgyōshinshō.Laeticia Söderman - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 190-206.
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  11. La Temporalidad Metanoética: Sobre Tanabe, Heidegger y Shinran.Rebeca Maldonado - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:113-144.
    In Tanabe’s reading of time in the work of Heidegger and, through Shinran’s interpretation, of the seventh-century Chinese philosopher Shandao, one can see that both Heidegger’s and Zendō’s viewpoints do not go beyond the ethical standpoint of self-power. Tanabe distances himself from any view that strays from the eternal present as it is witnessed in the practice of metanoesis, in which one attempts to live the continuous practice, not as if one were dead, but by effectively being so, that is, (...)
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1 — 50 / 91