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  1. ›Dōgen spricht auch von…‹. Zitate des Zen-Patriarchen in Nishidas Philosophie.Ralf Müller - 2014 - In Rolf Elberfeld & Yoko Arisaka (eds.), Kitaro Nishida in der Philosophie des 20. Jahrhunderts. Freiburg im Breisgau, Deutschland: pp. 203-238.
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  2. Inoue Enryō und die Entdeckung von Sprache im Zen – Über Prolegomena zur Philosophie der Zen-Schule von 1893.Ralf Müller - 2014 - In Raji C. Steineck (ed.), Begriff und Bild der modernen japanischen Philosophie. Stuttgart, Deutschland: pp. 63-105.
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  3. Ueda Shizuterus Philosophie in der Diskussion [Ueda Shizuteru’s philosophy in discussion].Ralf Müller - 2015 - Asiatische Studien / Études Asiatiques 2 (69):391–417.
    Ueda Shizuteru (born 1926) draws both on „Asian“ and „Western“ ideas to highlight the importance of silence as a mode of expression, especially in the Zen Buddhist tradition. This paper seeks to sort out the basic idea that stands behind his analysis: the idea of articulation, a term – implicitly or explicitly – taken from Wilhelm von Humboldt. Though Ueda acknowledges the importance of language, and – in line with Ernst Cassirer – of non-linguistic, i.e. symbolic forms of articulation, the (...)
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  4. The Articulation of Silence in Language. About Ueda Shizuteru’s Language Thinking.Ralf Müller - forthcoming - In Raquel Bouso & Adam Loughnane (eds.), Tetsugaku Companion to Ueda Shizuteru. Thoughts about Language, Experience and Zen. Heidelberg, Deutschland:
    Ueda Shizuteru (born 1926) draws both on „Asian“ and „Western“ ideas to highlight the importance of silence as a mode of expression, especially in the Zen Buddhist tradition. This paper seeks to sort out the basic idea that stands behind his analysis: the idea of articulation, a term – implicitly or explicitly – taken from Wilhelm von Humboldt. Though Ueda acknowledges the importance of language, and – in line with Ernst Cassirer – of non-linguistic, i.e. symbolic forms of articulation, the (...)
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  5. Masao Abe and the Problem of Evil in Buddhism and Christianity.Robert T. Lehe - 2019 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 39 (1):217-226.
    THE PROBLEM OF EVIL IN CHRISTIANITY AND BUDDHISM ABSTRACT In his prolegomena to “the problem of evil in Christianity and Buddhism” Masao Abe compares how Christianity and Buddhism explain the conflict between good and evil, the absolute ethical imperative to do good and avoid evil, and the problem that human beings inevitably fail to comply with that imperative. Abe argues that Buddhism and Christianity agree on the absoluteness of the imperative, but that Buddhism’s notions of the relativity and interdependence of (...)
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  6. Toward a Liberative Phenomenology of Zen.Bret W. Davis - 2017 - Yearbook for Eastern and Western Philosophy 2017 (2):304-320.
    The questions pursued in this essay are: What can philosophers today learn from a tradition of psychosomatic practice such as Zen Buddhism? How does such a tradition challenge the very methodology of our cerebral practice of philosophy? And finally: What would it mean to bring Western philosophy and the psychosomatic practice of Zen together, not necessarily to merge them into one, but at least to commute between them so that they may speak to and inform one another? In pursuing these (...)
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  7. Philosophical and Rhetorical Modes in Zen Discourse: Contrasting Nishida's Logic and Koan Poetry.Steven Heine - 1997 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 17:3.
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  8. The True Self in the Buddhist Philosophy of the Kyoto School.Fritz Buri & Harold H. Oliver - 1992 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 12:83.
  9. Letting Go of God for Nothing: Ueda Shizuteru’s Non-Mysticism and the Question of Ethics in Zen Buddhism.Bret W. Davis - 2008 - In Victor Sōgen Hori & Melissa Anne-Marie Curley (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 201-220.
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  10. Provocative Ambivalences in Japanese Philosophy of Religion: With a Focus on Nishida and Zen.Bret W. Davis - 2004 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 306-339.
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  11. Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook.James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John C. Maraldo - 2011 - University of Hawaiʻi Press.
  12. Review of 『ブッディスト・エコロジー:共生・環境・いのちの思想学』. [REVIEW]Yū Inutsuka - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:327-329.
  13. Review of The Line of the Arch: Intercultural Issues Between Aesthetics and Ethics. [REVIEW]John Altmann - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:378-382.
  14. Modern Zen and Psychoanalysis: The Semantic Connection.Rossa Ó Muireartaigh - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:189-202.
    This paper attempts to locate modern Zen and psychoanalysis in terms of contemporary philosophy of mind, particularly in view of dominant theories of cognitivism that see the mind as informational and material, with meaning being mere information in disguise. Psychoanalysis and modern Zen hold to the contrary view that the mind is “semantic,” not “syntactic,” and that the meanings we have in our heads are not reducible to the physical informational processes from which they have emerged. Meaning, as non-reducible, is (...)
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  15. Shocking Grace, Sudden Enlightenment: O’Connor and the Koans of Zen Buddhism.Scott Forschler - 2017 - The Flannery O'Connor Review 15:50-69.
    The work argues that the koans of Zen Buddhism have several intriguing non-accidental parallels with the short stories of Catholic author Flannery O'Connor. Both typically portray characters in a state of non-enlightenment in which they are egoistically obsessed with something which prevents them from perceiving and properly responding to the real world around them. Both present the characters with some opportunity for enlightenment, which they may or may not take up. Both come in a variety of forms, in order to (...)
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  16. Hay’s Buddhist Philosophy of Gestural Language.Joshua M. Hall - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (3):175-188.
    The central role of gestural language in Buddhism is widely acknowledged, as in the story of the Buddha pointing at the moon, the point being the student’s seeing beyond the finger to its gesture. Gesture’s role in dance is similarly central, as noted by scholars in the emerging interdisciplinary field of dance studies. Unsurprisingly, then, the intersection of these two fields is well-populated, including the formal gestures Buddhism inherited from classical Indian dance, and the masked dance of the Mani Rimdu (...)
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  17. Mysticism of Chan/Zen Enlightenment: A Rational Understanding Through Practices.Ming Dong Gu & Jianping Guo - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (2):235-251.
    There exists a widely accepted opinion in Chan/Zen 禪 studies that Chan enlightenment is a mysterium ineffabile, impenetrable by human intellect. Reviewing the debate between Hu Shi 胡適 and D. T. Suzuki over Chan enlightenment and accounts of testimony by Chan masters and practitioners in history, this essay argues that Chan enlightenment can be understood rationally and intellectually. By analyzing the time-honored Chan practices that have led to enlightenment, it seeks to understand the mystery as an extraordinary mental condition in (...)
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  18. Zen and Shinto.Dale Riepe - 1960 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (2):277-278.
  19. Zen and Shinto the Story of Japanese Philosophy.Chikao Fujisawa - 1959 - Philosophical Library.
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  20. Review of Sourcebook for Modern Japanese Philosophy: Selected Documents by David A. Dilworth; Valdo H. Viglielmo; Agustin Jacinto Zavala. [REVIEW]Steven Heine - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):311-312.
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  21. Arakawa and Gins’s Nonplace.Raquel Bouso Garcia - 2014 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2 (1):75-103.
    With the expression “apophatic aesthetics,” Amador Vega names dif-ferent cases of twentieth-century hermeneutics of negativity that show a spiritual debt to negative theology and in particular to the major mystical trends of Medieval Europe. Our aim here is to explore how this category applies to the artistic work created by the contemporary artists Arakawa and Gins. However, our focus is not on the debt of these artists to apophatism in the Christian tradition but in Buddhism, especially in Zen. Through an (...)
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  22. Japanese Archery: Zen in Action.Chauncey S. Goodrich, André Sollier, Zsolt Györbiró, Andre Sollier & Zsolt Gyorbiro - 1971 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 91 (4):518.
  23. Zen in Japanese Art; A Way of Spiritual Experience.E. H. S., Toshimitsu Hasumi & John Petrie - 1962 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 82 (2):282.
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  24. Essays in Zen Buddhism.E. H. S. & Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki - 1962 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 82 (1):141.
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  25. Zen and Shinto; The Story of Japanese Philosophy.E. H. S. - 1960 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 80 (2):189.
  26. An Introduction to Zen BuddhismThe Training of the Zen Buddhist MonkManual of Zen Buddhism.Shio Sakanishi & Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki - 1937 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 57 (4):445.
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  27. Buddhism: Its Birth and Dispersal.Indian Religion and Survival.Outlines of Buddhism.Japanese Buddhism.Essays in Zen Buddhism.The Training of the Zen Buddhist Monk. [REVIEW]James B. Pratt, C. A. F. Rhys Davids, Charles Eliot & D. T. Suzuki - 1935 - Journal of Philosophy 32 (13):358.
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  28. Eight Theories of Religion: Ethnicity, Ritual, and Violence in the Japanese Buddhist Tradition.Daniel L. Pals - 2006 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Why do human beings believe in divinities? Why do some seek eternal life, while others seek escape from recurring lives? Why do the beliefs and behaviors we typically call "religious" so deeply affect the human personality and so subtly weave their way through human society? Revised and updated in this second edition, Eight Theories of Religion considers how these fundamental questions have engaged the most important thinkers of the modern era. Accessible, systematic, and succinct, the text examines the classic interpretations (...)
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  29. Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Kōan in Zen Buddhism by Steven Heine.Victor Forte - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (2):671-676.
    Steven Heine’s latest book on the history of kōans, Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Kōan in Zen Buddhism, is his second monograph dedicated to a single kōan case record. The author’s first such offering, Shifting Shape, Shaping Text: Philosophy and Folklore in the Fox Kōan, focused on the second case record of the thirteenth-century Gateless Gate collection. Published at the end of the 1990s the text was a response, in many ways, to the two authors who dominated the (...)
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  30. Critical Buddhism: Engaging with Modern Japanese Buddhist Thought by James Mark Shields.Steven Heine - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (3):979-981.
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  31. Psychology, Ontology and Zen Soteriology.Hsueh–Li Cheng - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (3-4):459-472.
    During the past few decades, Zen Buddhism has been the most popular Buddhist school in the West and many scholars have expounded the essence of Zen. One of the most well–known expositions is D. T. Suzuki's psychological interpretation. Wu–nien in Zen is identified by him with the unconscious, and satori is seen as the psychological leaping of the unconscious. Other scholars contend that Zen has its ontological roots and should be understood ontologically rather than psychologically. Zen Buddhists are said to (...)
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  32. Reading Zen in the Rocks: The Japanese Dry Landscape Garden.Graham Parkes (ed.) - 2005 - University of Chicago Press.
    The Japanese dry landscape garden has long attracted—and long baffled—viewers from the West. While museums across the United States are replicating these "Zen rock gardens" in their courtyards and miniature versions of the gardens are now office decorations, they remain enigmatic, their philosophical and aesthetic significance obscured. _Reading Zen in the Rocks_, the classic essay on the _karesansui_ garden by French art historian François Berthier, has now been translated by Graham Parkes, giving English-speaking readers a concise, thorough, and beautifully illustrated (...)
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  33. Reading Zen in the Rocks: The Japanese Dry Landscape Garden.Graham Parkes (ed.) - 2000 - University of Chicago Press.
    The Japanese dry landscape garden has long attracted—and long baffled—viewers from the West. While museums across the United States are replicating these "Zen rock gardens" in their courtyards and miniature versions of the gardens are now office decorations, they remain enigmatic, their philosophical and aesthetic significance obscured. _Reading Zen in the Rocks_, the classic essay on the _karesansui_ garden by French art historian François Berthier, has now been translated by Graham Parkes, giving English-speaking readers a concise, thorough, and beautifully illustrated (...)
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  34. Zen and Japanese Culture.Daisetz T. Suzuki & Richard M. Jaffe - 1959 - Princeton University Press.
    Zen and Japanese Culture is one of the twentieth century's leading works on Zen, and a valuable source for those wishing to understand its concepts in the context of Japanese life and art. In simple, often poetic, language, Daisetz Suzuki describes his conception of Zen and its historical evolution. He connects Zen to the philosophy of the samurai, and subtly portrays the relationship between Zen and swordsmanship, haiku, tea ceremonies, and the Japanese love of nature. Suzuki's contemplative work is enhanced (...)
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  35. Awakening and Insight: Zen Buddhism and Psychotherapy.Polly Young-Eisendrath & Shoji Muramoto (eds.) - 2002 - Routledge.
    Buddhism first came to the West many centuries ago through the Greeks, who also influenced some of the culture and practices of Indian Buddhism. As Buddhism has spread beyond India, it has always been affected by the indigenous traditions of its new homes. When Buddhism appeared in America and Europe in the 1950s and 1960s, it encountered contemporary psychology and psychotherapy, rather than religious traditions. Since the 1990s, many efforts have been made by Westerners to analyze and integrate the similarities (...)
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  36. Buddhism and Postmodernity: Zen, Huayan, and the Possibility of Buddhist Postmodern Ethics.Jin Y. Park - 2008 - Lexington Books.
    Through a close analysis of Zen encounter dialogues and Huayan Buddhist philosophy, Buddhism and Postmodernity offers a new ethical paradigm for Buddhist-postmodern philosophy.
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  37. Naturalness in Zen and Shin Buddhism: Before and Beyond Self- and Other-Power.Bret W. Davis - 2014 - Contemporary Buddhism 15 (2):433-447.
    This article seeks to clarify the fundamental similarities and differences between the two most prominent forms of Buddhism in Japan: Zen and Shin Buddhism. While proponents of Zen typically criticize Shin for seeking the Buddha outside the self, rather than as one's ‘true self’ or ‘original face’, proponents of Shin typically criticize Zen for relying of ‘self-power’, which they understand as inevitably a form of ‘ego-power’, rather than entrusting oneself to the ‘Other-power’ of Amida Buddha. Yet Zen and Shin in (...)
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  38. Early Kierkegaard and the Zen Koan: A Study in Religous Experience.Gregory R. Dell '67 - unknown
    Religous experience is a puzzling phenomenon. It has appeared extensively throughout the history of man as a primary element in shaping his culture....I will try to examine the nature of the religious experience as it is conceived by the existential theologian Soren Kierkegaard and the Lin Chi or Rinzai school of Zen Buddhism. Further, I hope to point out the similarities of their methods in attaining this level of experience.
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  39. Zen Buddhism, Satori, Enlightenment & Truth.Peter Eastman - 2015
    Satori Zen is of immense interest to anyone pursuing authentic metaphysical knowledge because it claims to offer an astonishingly straightforward path to full Spiritual Enlightenment. And in terms of outright simplicity and immediate applicability, there is no other spiritual technique quite like it, in any other tradition anywhere. But does it do what it claims to do ? Can you really ‘power your way into heaven’ by brute meditative force ? And does this then mean that satori is equivalent to (...)
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  40. キルケゴールと日本の仏教・哲学.Masaru åotani & Toshikazu åoya - 1992
  41. 日本近世の思想と仏教.Okuwa Hitoshi - 1989 - Kyoto: Hozokan.
  42. Zen to Gendai Sekai.Tsutomu Horio & Shizuteru Ueda - 1997
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  43. UJISAWA'S Zen and Shinto. [REVIEW]Riepe Riepe - 1960 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21:277.
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  44. Meditation in Zen Buddhism.Kazuko Iibachi - 1996 - Dissertation, The Union Institute
    This dissertation investigates the question: "How do Zen Priests and Priestesses perceive and describe their experiences of Meditation in Zen Buddhism?" A comprehensive review of Japanese literature disclosed only two pertinent studies, both by Tamaki, "Meditation and Experience" and "Meditation and Thought" . A qualitative research design was utilized to obtain data--vivid descriptions of the textures and structures of the experience. From these, the meanings and essences of Meditation in Zen were derived. Data were gathered from eight co-researchers in open-ended (...)
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  45. Employing Zen Methods to Teach New Natural Law Theory.Jude Meng - 2008 - Philosophical Practice 3 (1):243-246.
    Rinzai Zen Buddhism employs intellectual puzzles or exercises called "koans" to assist with the attainment of spiritual insight or enlightenment. This paper borrows a similar pedagogical strategy to help students grasp certain foundational moral insights. It showcases an "ethics koan", i.e., an activity designed to help the person grasp in a practical manner the reality of normative first principles that identify basic goods and evils, called the principles of natural law in the Aristotelian-Thomistic tradition. The koan requires that student complete (...)
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  46. The Adventures of a Japanese Monk in Colonial Korea: Sōma Shōei’s Zen Training with Korean Masters.Kim Hwansoo - 2009 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 36 (1):125-165.
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  47. Review Of: James W. Heisig and John C. Maraldo, Eds., Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, and the Question of Nationalism. [REVIEW]Jamie Hubbard - 1996 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 23 (1-2):179-185.
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  48. Review Of: Michael Pye, Zen and Modern Japanese Religions. [REVIEW]David Reid - 1974 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 1 (4):347-349.
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  49. Review Of: Michiko Yusa, Zen and Philosophy: An Intellectual Biography of Nishida Kitarō. [REVIEW]Gereon Kopf - 2003 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 30 (1-2):197-201.
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  50. Action Performs Man: The Meaning of the Person in Japanese Zen Buddhism.Thomas Patrick Kasulis - 1975 - Dissertation, Yale University
1 — 50 / 363