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  1. Alan L. Mittleman (Ed.) Holiness in Jewish Thought. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018). Pp. X + 241. £65.00 (Hbk). ISBN: 978 0 19 879649 7. [REVIEW]Jonathan Nassim - 2019 - Religious Studies 55.
    Review of Alan L. Mittleman (ed.) Holiness in Jewish Thought.
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  2. Spinoza and the Kabbalah: From the Gate of Heaven to the ‘Field of Holy Apples’.Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - In Cristina Cisiu (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy & the Kabbalah.
    In the first part of this paper we will consider the likely extent of Spinoza’s exposure to Kabbalistic literature as he was growing up in Amsterdam. In the second part we will closely study several texts in which Spinoza seems to engage with Kabbalistic doctrines. In the third and final part we will study the role of the two crucial doctrines of emanation and pantheism (or panentheism), in Spinoza’s system and in the Kabbalistic literature.
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  3. Reconfiguring the Theodicy–Antitheodicy Boundary Between Responses to the Holocaust.David Tollerton - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (2):278-292.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 278 - 292 Responding to Zachary Braiterman’s and Daniel Garner’s ideas on post-Holocaust religious thought, the author proposes a new model of relationships between theodicy and antitheodicy in which divine perfection is no longer privileged as the single key factor. Building on Peter Berger’s and Clifford Geertz’s treatments of the problem of evil, it is suggested that focusing on meaning-making and tradition can result in a stratified view of theodicy–antitheodicy more able to engage (...)
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  4. The Metaphysical, Epistemological, and Mystical Aspects of Happiness in the Treatise on Ultimate Happiness Attributed to Moses Maimonides.Avi Elqayam - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (2):174-211.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 174 - 211 This article explores the metaphysical, epistemological, and mystical aspects of happiness in the Judeo-Arabic _Treatise on Ultimate Happiness_, of which only two chapters have survived from what is thought to have been a more comprehensive text. Although the treatise is attributed to Moses Maimonides, the conception of happiness it presents is clearly that of the Pietists, the Jewish-Sufi circle of thirteenth-century Egypt. The discussion of happiness in this short treatise constitutes (...)
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  5. Being-Towards-Eternity: R. Isaac Hutner’s Adaptation of a Heideggerian Notion.Daniel Herskowitz & Alon Shalev - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (2):254-277.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 254 - 277 In his writings, Rabbi Isaac Hutner integrated various insights from secular philosophy and particularly from existentialist thought. Concerns regarding temporality, authenticity, and death permeate his thought. This article deals with what we call “being-towards-eternity,” a modification of Martin Heidegger’s “being-towards-death,” through which Hutner seeks to reconcile genuine anxiety in the face of finitude with an unwavering belief in resurrection and life after death. Hutner’s appropriation and adaptation of this Heideggerian notion (...)
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  6. “The East Within Us”: Leo Strauss’s Reinterpretation of Heidegger.David McIlwain - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (2):233-253.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 233 - 253 Leo Strauss’s grand theme, the theological-political problem, has its basis in the predicament of being a philosopher in a political society. As a Jew and a philosopher, Strauss also faced the entanglement of Judaism and German philosophy culminating in Heidegger’s historicism. These related challenges prompted Strauss’s recognition of the first steps for philosophy in a global epoch. Strauss reinterpreted Heidegger’s religious anticipation of a “meeting of East and West” as a (...)
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  7. God of Abraham, God of Aristotle: Soloveitchik’s Reading of The Guide of the Perplexed.Alex Sztuden - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (2):212-232.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 212 - 232 R. Joseph Soloveitchik’s profound engagement with _The Guide of the Perplexed_ is amply attested by Lawrence Kaplan’s recent publication of Soloveitchik’s lectures on this classic work of Jewish philosophy, delivered in 1950–1951 during a year-long course on the _Guide_. Soloveitchik’s reading is situated outside the boundaries of the _Guide_’s usual interpretations, and his lectures offer an entirely new view of the essence of the _Guide_. For Maimonides, _hesed_, or loving-kindness, is (...)
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  8. Yaʿqūb Al-Qirqisānī on Human Intellect, Legal Inference, and the Meaning of the Aristotelian Syllogism.Aviram Ravitsky - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (2):149-173.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 149 - 173 In the fourth treatise of his legal-theological work _Kitāb al-Anwār wa-al-Marāqib_, Yaʿqūb al-Qirqisānī analyzes a criticism of the Aristotelian syllogism and its epistemological foundations. Qirqisānī defends Aristotelian logic by quoting a passage from an unknown commentary on Aristotle in which the Aristotelian theory of syllogism is explicated. This paper focuses on the historical, theological, and philosophical meanings of the criticism of the syllogism in Qirqisānī’s discussion and analyzes his interpretation of (...)
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  9. Andrew D. Berns, The Bible and Natural Philosophy in Renaissance Italy. Jewish and Christian Physicians in Search of Truth (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014). [REVIEW]Maria Vittoria Comacchi - 2015 - Philosophical Readings 7:61-63.
  10. De Husserl a Levinas. Un camino en la fenomenología.Francisco-Javier Herrero-Hernández - 2005 - Salamanca, España: Publications Pontifical University of Salamanca.
    Es sabido que Levinas pasa por ser uno de los primeros y mejores intérpretes de la obra de Husserl y tampoco nadie duda ya, a estas alturas de la investigación, de la decisiva mediación histórica que significó para la naciente fenomenología francesa la labor pionera de nuestro joven autor. Filósofos como Sartre, Ricoeur o Henry no se podrían entender completamente sin el concurso de la obra más temprana de Levinas. La tesis principal que ha vertebrado mi exposición defiende que una (...)
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  11. Post-Holocaust Jewish Aniconism and the Theological Significance of Barnett Newman's.Christopher M. Cuthill - forthcoming - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 118 - 147 This paper challenges the widespread emphasis on the absence of God in post- Holocaust historiography, theology, and art by suggesting that Barnett Newman’s _Stations of the Cross_ may have been conceived under the theological category of the apophatic rather than the aesthetic category of the sublime. This paper focuses on the “anti-realist” position of Newman and other artists for whom the Holocaust necessitated a renewed aniconic tendency in Jewish aesthetics. His (...)
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  12. The Autobiography of Solomon Maimon.Solomon Maimon, Yitzhak Melamed & Abraham Socher - 2018 - Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  13. Post-Holocaust Jewish Aniconism and the Theological Significance of Barnett Newman’s Stations of the Cross.Christopher M. Cuthill - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (1):118-147.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 118 - 147 This paper challenges the widespread emphasis on the absence of God in post- Holocaust historiography, theology, and art by suggesting that Barnett Newman’s _Stations of the Cross_ may have been conceived under the theological category of the apophatic rather than the aesthetic category of the sublime. This paper focuses on the “anti-realist” position of Newman and other artists for whom the Holocaust necessitated a renewed aniconic tendency in Jewish aesthetics. His (...)
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  14. The Sefer as a Challenge to Reception Theories.Iddo Dickmann - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (1):67-93.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 67 - 93 The talmudic sages granted the legal status of _sefer_ to five texts: the Torah, _tefillin_, the _get_, the _mezuzah_, and the Scroll of Esther. These texts share two features: they have a ritualistic format and use, and they are the only sacred texts that demonstrate _mise en abyme_—the trait of literary self-containing. These two traits turn the rabbinic book into a radical case of “open work”: the _sefer_ consists of both (...)
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  15. God, Being, Pathos.Daniel Herskowitz - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (1):94-117.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 94 - 117 Martin Heidegger’s philosophy has elicited many theological responses; some enthusiastic, others critical. In this essay I provide an organized and critical analysis of Abraham Joshua Heschel’s theological critique of and rejoinder to the thought of the German philosopher. By looking at Heschel’s 1965 _Who is Man?_ as well as earlier and later texts, I demonstrate the way in which Heschel presents his biblical theology as an alternative to Heidegger’s philosophy.
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  16. A Community Should Be Present as He Prays so That He Can Bind Himself with Their Soul.Moshe Goultschin - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (1):34-66.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 34 - 66 During his final years, R. Nahman of Bratslav endeavored to find a solution for the paradox of unrealized messiahs. His solution was outlined in his dream about birds in December 1806, on the Sabbath of _Parashat Va-yeḥi_. This dream was influenced by his reading of a story told in the _Zohar, Parashat Va-yeḥi_, of a “vision of birds” of R. Yehudah, a disciple of R. Shimon bar Yohai, that exemplifies the (...)
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  17. Revealing What’s Implicit.Paul E. Nahme - 2018 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 26 (1):1-33.
    _ Source: _Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 1 - 33 This article reinterprets Maimonides’ theory of creation and revelation by focusing upon the relationship between belief in creation and the affirmation of miracle and law described in _Guide_ II :25. Focusing upon Maimonides’ use of inference to describe creation and revelation, I re-evaluate Maimonides’ account as an instance of inferential reasoning. That is, Maimonides makes use of, rather than proves, the _implicit_ norms of creation and revelation in their _explicit_ function (...)
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  18. David Patterson, Anti-Semitism and Its Metaphysical Origins (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015). [REVIEW]Frederic Tremblay - 2017 - European Journal of Jewish Studies 11 (2):203-209.
    This is a critical review of David Patterson's book Anti-Semitism and Its Metaphysical Origins (2015). In this review, I present the author's new explanation of the roots of anti-Semitism, which he finds in the anti-Semite's desire to become like God himself. Patterson's explanation makes an anti-Semite of all those who partake in the "Western rationalist project," especially philosophers (including Jewish philosophers such as Spinoza, Hermann Cohen, and Marx), but also Islamists and anti-Zionist Jews. I criticize Patterson on two fronts: First, (...)
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  19. R. Abraham Isaac Kook and the Opening Passage of “The War”.Hanoch Ben-Pazi - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (2):256-278.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 256 - 278 Rabbi Abraham Isaac Ha-Cohen Kook’s essay “The War” is a text of immense importance with respect to the development of ideological militaristic writing in religious Zionism. The essay was first published in the book _Orot me-Ofel_, edited by R. Kook’s son, Rabbi Zvi Yehudah Kook. In this study, I wish to distinguish the views presented in the notebooks and collected writings of R. Kook from his position as set forth in (...)
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  20. From “Jewish Memory” to Jewish History.Robert Chazan - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (2):279-304.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 279 - 304 In his influential _Zakhor: Jewish History and Jewish Memory_, Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi analyzed brilliantly the transition in Jewish conceptions of Jewish history from premodern to modern times. The present paper discusses a number of alternative perspectives on this transition. Yerushalmi argued convincingly the importance of the traditional conception of Jewish history, which he labeled “Jewish memory,” for Jewish survival. This paper challenges the terminology, agrees with the role played by the (...)
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  21. Judaism’s Christianity.Alexandra Aidler - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (2):232-255.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 232 - 255 In Book III of _The Star of Redemption_, Franz Rosenzweig contrasts Judaism and Christianity: Judaism consists in the eternal passage of a people from creation to revelation; it suspends the divide between God’s presence and his worldly manifestation. For Rosenzweig, being Jewish means to be with God in the world. Christianity, however, defers salvation. While Judaism is with God in the world, Christianity retreats from God and the world. Christianity therefore (...)
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  22. Mendelssohn’s Concept of Natural Religion Re-Examined.Haim Mahlev - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (2):209-231.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 209 - 231 The essay explores Moses Mendelssohn’s concept of natural religion by contrasting it with the way it was understood by his contemporaries. An examination of key aspects—the role of pagans, knowledge transfer, the possible redundancy of revealed religion, and Judaism’s attitude toward “unphilosophical” knowledge—suggests that Mendelssohn’s view was not only shaped through direct and indirect reactions to his intellectual surrounding, but also that it employed Christian arguments in order to construct an (...)
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  23. The Concept of Evil in 4 Maccabees.Hans Moscicke - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (2):163-195.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 163 - 195 The concept of evil in 4 Maccabees differs from what we find in most ancient Jewish literature, and little attention has been paid to its philosophical background. In this article I submit that the author of 4 Maccabees has absorbed and adapted a Stoic conception of evil into his Jewish philosophy. I trace the concept of evil in Stoicism and in 4 Maccabees using the categories of value theory, natural law, (...)
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  24. Les Fondements Naturels de la Loi Divine Dans L’Œuvre de Rabbi Josef Albo.Shalom Sadik - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (2):196-208.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 196 - 208 The aim of the article is to analyze the concepts of natural law, political law, and divine law in the thought of Rabbi Josef Albo. The article concludes that according to R. Albo, the true divine law has something natural. Humans can understand by themselves that natural law is not developed enough to assure their needs. They can comprehend as well that only divine law can be a good political law, (...)
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  25. Cohen, Spinoza, and the Nature of Pantheism.Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - Jewish Studies Quarterly.
    The German text of Cohen’s Spinoza on State & Religion, Judaism & Christianity (Spinoza über Staat und Religion, Judentum und Christentum) first appeared in 1915 in the Jahrbuch für jüdische Geschichte und Literatur. Two years before, in the winter of 1913, Cohen taught a class and a seminar on Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise at the Hochschule für die Wissenschaft des Judentums. This was Cohen’s first semester at the Hochschule, after retiring from more than thirty years of teaching at the University of (...)
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  26. Sacramental Existence and Embodied Theology in Buber’s Representation of Ḥasidism.Sam Berrin Shonkoff - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):131-161.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 131 - 161 Martin Buber denied consistently that he was a theologian because he repudiated abstract discourse about God. However, he did affirm that intersubjective events in the world express theological truth, even if that truth cannot be possessed or professed thereafter as noetic content. In this paper I introduce a concept of “embodied theology” to elucidate this nuance in Buber’s religious thought, and I show how his Ḥasidic writings shed unique light on (...)
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  27. The Hard and the Soft.Samuel Hayim Brody - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):72-94.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 72 - 94 Politics has never been considered Martin Buber’s forte. This paper considers the range of Buber’s reception as a political thinker by considering it in the form of three “moments,” each from a different point in his career, and each through the eyes of a different figure who either read or worked with Buber politically: Theodor Herzl, Gustav Landauer, and Hans Kohn. The three moments are structured around a discussion of the (...)
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  28. Companionable Being.Gilpin W. Clark - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):59-71.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 59 - 71 American religious thinkers of the mid-twentieth century regularly included appreciative comments about Martin Buber’s thought in their books and essays, but they seldom stated specifically what they were drawing from Buber. Their comments did, however, tend to circle around a single issue: modern social, political, and technological changes were destabilizing both the sense of “the uniqueness of human selfhood” and the possibility of its distinctively “religious existence.” They sought a third (...)
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  29. Martin Buber and the Problem of Dialogue in Contemporary Thought.Hans Joas - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):105-109.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 105 - 109 This paper asks two questions: Who in the history of ideas were the main initiators of dialogical thinking? What are Martin Buber’s main merits in this regard? It comes to the conclusion that Buber’s main achievement was his understanding of the performative character of statements about the personhood of God. His dialogical understanding of religious experience is in need of being synthesized with an empirically grounded understanding of human intersubjectivity as (...)
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  30. Martin Buber’s Socialism.Michael Löwy - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):95-104.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 95 - 104 Martin Buber was a creative and heterodox socialist thinker. His socialist utopia was based on the idea of a new community that does not hark back to ancient forms, but wants to overcome modern society while incorporating its achievements, such as the principle of individual freedom. It is not bound, like the old _Gemeinschaft_—the tribe, the clan, the religious sect—by one single word or opinion that soon freezes into dogma and (...)
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  31. From Genius to Taste.Sarah Scott - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):110-130.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 110 - 130 I reconstruct the aestheticism of Martin Buber in order to provide a new way of framing his moral philosophy and development as a thinker. The evolution of Buber’s thought does not entail a shift from aesthetics to ethics, but a shift from one aspect of aesthetics to another, namely, from taking _genius_ to be key to social renewal, to taking _ _taste_ _ to be key. I draw on Kantian aesthetics (...)
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  32. Defining Christianity and Judaism From the Perspective of Religious Anarchy.Shaul Magid - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):36-58.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 36 - 58 This essay explores Martin Buber’s rendering of Jesus and the Ba‘al Shem Tov as two exemplars of religious anarchism that create a lens through which to see the symmetry between Judaism and Christianity. The essay argues that Buber’s use of Jesus to construct his view of the Ba‘al Shem Tov enables us to revisit the “parting of the ways” between Judaism and Christianity through the category of the religious anarchist.
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  33. Preface.Sam Berrin Shonkoff & Paul Mendes-Flohr - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):1-3.
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  34. Theolatry and the Making-Present of the Nonrepresentable.Elliot R. Wolfson - 2017 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 25 (1):5-35.
    _ Source: _Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 5 - 35 In this essay, I place Buber’s thought in dialogue with Eckhart. Each understood that the theopoetic propensity to imagine the transcendent in images is no more than a projection of our will to impute form to the formless. The presence of God is made present through imaging the real, but imaging the real implies that the nonrepresentable presence can only be made present through the absence of representation. The goal of (...)
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  35. Verdict and Sentence: Cover and Levinas on the Robe of Justice.Robert Gibbs - 2006 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 14 (1-2):73-89.
    Few problems are as challenging to Levinas's ethics as the tension or even chiasm that opens between the ethics in relation to the face and the claims of the third. This paper offers a reading of the role of the judge in court as the model for understanding the relation of these two aspects of justice. I make reference to an essay by the legal theorist Robert Cover that explored the violence of the courtroom. He shows how society contains appropriate (...)
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  36. Hermann Cohen, Maimonides, and the Jewish Virtue of Humility.Robert Erlewine - 2010 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 18 (1):27-47.
    This paper explores Hermann Cohen's engagement with, and appropriation of, Maimonides to refute the common assumption that Cohen's endeavor was to harmonize Judaism with Western culture. Exploring the changes of Cohen's conception of humility from _Ethik des reinen Willens_ to the _Ethics of Maimonides_ and _Religion of Reason out of the Sources of Judaism_, this paper highlights the centrality of the collective Jewish mission to bear witness against the dominant order of Western civilization and philosophy in Cohen's Jewish thought.
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  37. The Collective Soul.Uriel Barak - 2016 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 24 (2):300-317.
    _ Source: _Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 300 - 317 This article examines R. Zvi Yehudah Kook’s reading of two earlier thinkers who were influential in the formulation of his thought—the Maharal of Prague and R. Avraham Azulai. I argue that his creative and unique reading of these texts exemplifies a fascinating dialogue he held with earlier sources, which he interpreted and infused with his own theological postulates. Here I explore his theory of the unique nature of the Jewish soul, (...)
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  38. The Kabbalistic Sources of Spinoza.Johan Aanen - 2016 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 24 (2):279-299.
    _ Source: _Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 279 - 299 This article provides the first overview of research on the kabbalistic sources of Benedictus de Spinoza. While this topic has not been a major focus in Spinoza research, this article argues that it has both biographical and philosophical relevance for the investigation of Spinoza and the context in which he first conceived of his hallmark ideas. Revisiting the extant historical sources, this article refines the present understanding of the connection between (...)
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  39. Aimed Inquiry and Positive Theology in Sefer Maʿayan Ha-Ḥokhmah.Oded Porat - 2016 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 24 (2):224-278.
    _ Source: _Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 224 - 278 This article discusses the anonymous early kabbalistic work _Sefer Maʿayan ha-Ḥokhmah_, one of the pivotal works of ʿIyyun literature. The first part deals with the book’s historical and literary aspects. The second part interprets a specific formulation in light of the basic ideas of the book itself, presenting the twofold pattern as a mystical type and as a grounding for linguistic-theological theory. The third part discusses the term “positive theology” in (...)
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  40. The Bible Read Through the Prism of Theology.Marzena Zawanowska - 2016 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 24 (2):163-223.
    _ Source: _Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 163 - 223 The paper demonstrates that when translating explicit anthropomorphisms in Scripture, medieval Karaites are neither particularly more nor less literal than their rabbinic counterparts. Indeed, they often propose translations similar to those of Targum Onqelos and Saʿadyah Gaon. Moreover, although their lines of argument are different, both Saʿadyah and the Karaites insist that human language is responsible for corporeal descriptions of God in the Bible, and they resort to the linguistic conventions (...)
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  41. Leo Strauss on Maimonides.Raymond L. Weiss - 2016 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 24 (1):149-161.
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  42. The Lure of Heresy: A Philosophical Typology of Hebrew Secularism in the First Half of the Twentieth Century.Yuval Jobani - 2016 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 24 (1):95-121.
    _ Source: _Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 95 - 121 Contemporary study of Jewish secularism in the Modern era has yielded a nuanced picture of Hebrew secularism. This article analyzes the emergence of a rich and diverse cultural infrastructure of Hebrew secularism in the first half of the twentieth century from a philosophical perspective, proposing a typology of models of Hebrew secularism. These models are characterized by their attitudes to what, following Charles Taylor, can be referred to as the “fragmentary (...)
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  43. R. Nathan Sternhartz’s Liqquṭei Tefilot and the Formation of Bratslav Hasidism.Jonatan Meir - 2016 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 24 (1):60-94.
    _ Source: _Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 60 - 94 One of the more astounding books produced by Bratslav Hasidism is _Liqquṭei tefilot_, composed by R. Nathan Sternhartz of Nemirov, which established a whole new genre in Bratslav literature. This article discusses the book’s genesis, publication, and primary goals, as well as the controversy it generated. The new Bratslav theology that emerged after the death of Rabbi Naḥman led to disputes, both internal and external, over the role and character of (...)
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  44. From Lucretia to Don Kr[E]Ensia, or, Sorry, I Just Had to Convert.Eliezer Papo - 2016 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 24 (1):31-59.
    _ Source: _Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 31 - 59 Eschatological expectations and messianic hopes aroused by the expulsion of Jews from Spain climaxed in the seventeenth century with the appearance of Sabbatai Tzevi. In 1666, Sultan Mehmed IV, eager to halt the uproar without creating a martyr, offered Tzevi a choice between conversion to Islam and death. Tzevi chose life. Although many Jews were devastated by his apostasy, a nucleus of Sabbatai’s most ardent followers preferred to interpret it as (...)
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  45. Philosophy and Praxis in the Thought of Aaron David Gordon.Joseph Turner - 2016 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 24 (1):122-148.
    _ Source: _Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 122 - 148 This paper examines the tension between philosophy and praxis in the thought of Aaron David Gordon. Highlighting the methodical character of Gordon’s philosophical understanding of human existence in terms of “man-in-nature,” I attempt to show that while his philosophy was initially meant to influence the construction of society and culture in the Land of Israel at the beginning of the twentieth century, it is particularly relevant with regard to contemporary philosophical (...)
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  46. The Kabbalistic Remez and Its Status in Naḥmanides’ Commentary on the Torah.Oded Yisraeli - 2016 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 24 (1):1-30.
    _ Source: _Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 1 - 30 Naḥmanides’ commentary on the Torah, in which he combined literal, midrashic, and kabbalistic comments side by side, is one of the best known and most influential exegetical works of the Middle Ages. This article concentrates on the esoteric exegesis in this commentary and argues that Naḥmanides’ kabbalistic interpretation employs two types of exegesis—_perush_ and _remez_—each of which represents a separate hermeneutic approach and thus a different reading of the biblical text. (...)
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  47. Erich Unger's "The Natural Order of Miracles": I. The Pentateuch and the Vitalistic Myth.Esther Ehrman - 2002 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 11 (2):135-152.
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  48. Erich Unger's "The Natural Order of Miracles": II. The World of Nature and Miracles in the Pentateuch.Esther Ehrman - 2002 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 11 (2):153-189.
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  49. Rosenzweig's Readings of Hermann Cohen's Logic of Pure Cognition.Pierfrancesco Fiorato & Hartwig Wiedebach - 2003 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 12 (2):139-146.
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  50. Hasidim and Mitnaggedim : Not a World Apart.Sreharon Flatto - 2003 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 12 (2):99-121.
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