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  1. Assuming Risk: A Critical Analysis of a Soldier's Duty to Prevent Collateral Casualties.Cheryl Abbate - 2014 - Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):70-93.
    Recent discussions in the just war literature suggest that soldiers have a duty to assume certain risks in order to protect the lives of all innocent civilians. I challenge this principle of risk by arguing that it is justified neither as a principle that guides the conduct of combat soldiers, nor as a principle that guides commanders in the US military. I demonstrate that the principle of risk fails on the first account because it requires soldiers both to violate their (...)
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  2. Can We Speak Of Just War In Islam?Makram Abbes - 2014 - History of Political Thought 35 (2):234-261.
    Moving away from received ideas and apologetic readings, this article deals with the notion of 'just war' in Islam as it appears in a series of different texts in order to demonstrate how thought on this subject has evolved from the birth of Islam in the seventh century through to the recent developments of the twenty-first century. Moving beyond a theoretical framework that analyses the criteria of just war according to Western definitions, this article traces its discursive presence throughout various (...)
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  3. When Ethics Meets Politics: Concerning the Possibility of Fighting a Justified War in the Late Twentieth Century.Robert Paul Abele - 1995 - Dissertation, Marquette University
    The Just War Theory, developed from the time of St. Augustine, has been subject to attack from numerous positions. Specifically, there are three main contemporary arguments for rejecting the Just War Theory. First, the position of Realism insists upon an absolute dichotomy between ethics and politics, thus a fortiori between ethics and warfare. Second, Pacifism maintains an absoluteness to ethical values which precludes war as a moral possibility. Third, nuclear weapons, with their vast destructive power, seem to violate all tenets (...)
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  4. The Future of Iust War Theory1.Keith Abney - 2013 - In Fritz Allhoff, Nicholas Evans & Adam Henschke (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Ethics and War: Just War Theory in the 21st Century. Routledge. pp. 338.
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  5. Immoral Authorities: Crusades, Jihād and Just War Rhetoric.Michele Acuto - 2010 - Journal of Global Ethics 6 (1):17-26.
    This paper highlights the relevance of moral authority, and the role that egoistic ethical claims have in waging war. This is done, in view of the just war tradition, by drawing a parallel between the crusades in the 'kingdom of heaven' proclaimed in 1095, and the present Islamic jih d , as well as the Bush administration's declaration of a war on terror. It maintains that the role of self-legitimized leaders is crucial in shaping the order of the jus ad (...)
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  6. Teichman . - Pacifism and the Just War. [REVIEW]M. Adam - 1988 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 178:231.
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  7. That Same Old Line: The Doctrine of Legitimate Authority.Richard Adams - 2015 - Philosophical Forum 46 (1):71-89.
    The jus ad bellum doctrine of legitimate authority, conceived by St. Augustine and evolved by St. Thomas Aquinas, that a sovereign might identify a just cause and declare war without reference to the nation’s soldiers or citizens, continues to inform thinking about just war. Contesting this claim, the present paper reasons that without the moral confidence of the soldiers who serve, no conflict can be justified. The paper claims that soldiers have relevant and important ideas about the justice of the (...)
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  8. Research on the Ethics of War in the Context of Violence in Gaza.Howard Adelman - 2009 - Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):93-113.
    The paper first demonstrates the ability to provode objective data and analyses during war and then examines the need for such objective gathering of data and analysis in the context of mass violence and war, specifically in the 2009 Gaza War. That data and analysis is required to assess compliance with just war norms in assessing the conduct of the war, a framework quite distinct from human rights norms that can misapply and deform the application of norms such as proportionality (...)
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  9. David Fisher , Morality and War: Can War Be Just in the Twenty-First Century? Reviewed By.Peter Admirand - 2013 - Philosophy in Review 33 (1):34-36.
  10. Just War: An Islamic Perspective.Imam Sayed Moustafa Al-Qazwini - 2004 - Nexus 9:79.
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  11. Self-Defense and the Killing of Noncombatants: A Reply to Fullinwider.Lawrence A. Alexander - 1976 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 5 (4):408-415.
  12. Measuring International Ethics: A Moral Scale of War, Peace, Justice, and Global Care.Pierre Allan - 2006 - In What is a Just Peace? Oxford University Press.
    This chapter distinguishes Just Peace from its closest ‘moral’ neighbours — a stable peace and positive peace. Drawing on both consequentialist and deontological considerations, Allan develops an international ethical scale to evaluate different acts from a moral standpoint, with different levels of conflict as the baseline of ethical behavior. The more extreme the discord, the worse it is considered on the scale; the more harmonious, the better. Arguing that absolute unhappiness and absolute happiness are not of this world, Allan presents (...)
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  13. Introduction: Rethinking Peace and Justice Conceptually.Pierre Allan & Alexis Keller - 2006 - In What is a Just Peace? Oxford University Press.
    War has always been a problem that has plagued our existence, and begged for civility and restriction in its use. The idea behind engaging in war has often been based on assuring a place for peace in the not so distant future, whether the motivation was normative, as within the Just War Doctrine, or simply the hope that victory would lead to the end of organized violence. A group of scholars, intellectuals, and practitioners has been brought together in this volume (...)
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  14. Iust War Theory1.Braden Allenby - 2013 - In Fritz Allhoff, Nicholas Evans & Adam Henschke (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Ethics and War: Just War Theory in the 21st Century. Routledge. pp. 289.
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  15. Not Just Wars.Fritz Allhoff (ed.) - forthcoming - Routledge.
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  16. The Routledge Handbook of War and Ethics: Just War Theory in the 21st Century.Fritz Allhoff, Nicholas G. Evans & Adam Henschke (eds.) - 2013 - Routledge.
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  17. Routledge Handbook of Ethics and War: Just War Theory in the 21st Century.Fritz Allhoff, Nicholas Evans & Adam Henschke (eds.) - 2013 - Routledge.
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  18. Growing Edges of Just War Theory: Jus Ante Bellum, Jus Post Bellum, and Imperfect Justice.Mark J. Allman & Tobias L. Winright - 2012 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 32 (2):173-191.
  19. Reconciling Just Causes for Armed Humanitarian Intervention.Eamon Aloyo - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    Michael Walzer argues that the just cause for humanitarian intervention is not met if there are only “ordinary” levels of human rights abuses within a state because he believes that respecting the right to collective self-determination is more morally important than protecting other individual rights. Several prominent critics of Walzer advocate for a more permissive account of a just cause. They argue that protecting individuals’ human rights is more morally important than respecting a right to collective self-determination. I argue that (...)
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  20. Just War Theory and the Last of Last Resort.Eamon Aloyo - 2015 - Ethics and International Affairs 29 (2):187-201.
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  21. From Humanitarian Intervention to Assassination: Human Rights and Political Violence.Andrew Altman & Christopher Heath Wellman - 2008 - Ethics 118 (2):228-257.
  22. Morality, Just Post Bellum and International Law.Andrew Forcehimes Larry May (ed.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays brings together some of the leading legal, political and moral theorists to discuss the normative issues that arise when war concludes and when a society strives to regain peace. In the transition from war, mass atrocity or a repressive regime, how should we regard the idea of democracy and human rights? Should regimes be toppled unless they are democratic or is it sufficient that these regimes are less repressive than before? Are there moral reasons for thinking (...)
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  23. Just Warfare Theory and Noncombatant Immunity.Richard Arneson - manuscript
    ..............................................................................................101 I. The Idea of a Noncombatant ........................................................104 II. The Moral Shield Protecting Noncombatants.............................106 A. Accommodation.......................................................................107 B. Guilty Past ...............................................................................107 C. Guilty Bystander Trying to Inflict Harm .................................109 D. Guilty Bystander Disposed to Inflict Harm .............................109 E. Guilty Bystander Exulting in Anticipated Evil ........................109 F. Fault Forfeits First Doctrine in Just Warfare ...........................110 III. Noncombatants as Wrongful Trespassers ...................................110 IV. The Noncombatant Status of Captured Soldiers ........................111 V. Guerrilla Combat ..........................................................................116 VI. Morally Innocent Unjust Combatants.........................................118 VII. Should Rights Reflect What (...)
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  24. Can Information Warfare Ever Be Just?John Arquilla - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (3):203-212.
    The information revolution has fostered the rise of new ways of waging war, generally by means of cyberspace-based attacks on the infrastructures upon which modern societies increasingly depend. This new way of war is primarily disruptive, rather than destructive; and its low barriers to entry make it possible for individuals and groups (not just nation-states) easily to acquire very serious war-making capabilities. The less lethal appearance of information warfare and the possibility of cloaking the attacker''s true identity put serious pressure (...)
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  25. How Just Could a Robot War Be?Peter Asaro - 2008 - In P. Brey, A. Briggle & K. Waelbers (eds.), Current Issues in Computing and Philosophy. Ios Press. pp. 50--64.
  26. Pacifism and the Just War: A Study in Applied Philosophy.Robin Attfield - 1988 - Philosophical Books 29 (2):103-105.
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  27. Just War and the Common Good: Ius Ad Bellum Principles in 20th Century Papal Thought, by Brian M. Kane. Catholic Scholars Press (London, Eurospan) 1996. 286 Pp. Hb.£ 55.95. ISBN 1-53709-109-X. Pb.£ 39.95. ISBN 1-57309-108-1. [REVIEW]D. Attwood - 1998 - Studies in Christian Ethics 11 (2):159-160.
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  28. Paul Ramsey's Just - War Doctrine.D. Attwood - 1994 - Studies in Christian Ethics 7 (2):155-155.
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  29. Non-Culpable Ignorance and Just War Theory.Jovan Babic - 2007 - Filozofija I Društvo 18 (3):59-68.
    The so called ′non-culpable ignorance′ is an instrument to justify participating in a war on a defeated side, on condition that fighters sincerely believe that they are defending a just cause and had some valid reasons to believe in having a chance to win. Within the just war theory this instrument is needed to make both sides prima facie right, otherwise the theory would imply that those who lose are guilty in advance, especially if they are the weaker side. However, (...)
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  30. Considerações sobre a Guerra E Paz em meio à soberania Das nações.Augusto Bach - 2013 - Cadernos de Ética E Filosofia Política 22:105-121.
    In spite all the efforts made by pundits and policy-makers nowadays, the article intends to show how the concepts of jus in bello and jus ad bellum have been misjudged and misinterpreted along its own consolidation in our juridical thought. We also believe they deserve a new approach opened by Foucault´s point of view. In doing so, the issues of sovereignty, war and peace are all reviewed before a genealogical approach which opens us a different window to access the new (...)
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  31. Just War Theories Reconsidered: Problems with Prima Facie Duties and the Need for a Political Ethic.Helmut David Baer & Joseph E. Capizzi - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (1):119-137.
    This essay challenges a "meta-theory" in just war analysis that purports to bridge the divide between just war and pacifism. According to the meta-theory, just war and pacifism share a common presumption against killing that can be overridden only under conditions stipulated by the just war criteria. Proponents of this meta-theory purport that their interpretation leads to ecumenical consensus between "just warriors" and pacifists, and makes the just war theory more effective in reducing recourse to war. Engagement with the new (...)
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  32. Epistemic Uncertainty and Excusable Wars.Deane‐Peter Baker - 2015 - Philosophical Forum 46 (1):55-69.
  33. What's in a War? (Politics as War, War as Politics).Etienne Balibar - 2008 - Ratio Juris 21 (3):365-386.
    Abstract. This paper combines reflections on the current "state of war" in the Middle East with an epistemological discussion of the meaning and implications of the category "war" itself, in order to dissipate the confusions arising from the idea of a "War on Terror." The first part illustrates the insufficiency of the ideal type involved in dichotomies which are implicit in the naming and classifications of wars. They point nevertheless to a deeper problem which concerns the antinomic character of a (...)
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  34. Just War in Afghanistan?Bruce Ballard - 2004 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 14 (2):133-152.
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  35. Of Myth, Life, and War in Plato's Republic.Claudia Baracchi - 2002 - Indiana University Press.
    "Baracchi has identified pivotal points around which the Republic operates; this allows a reading of the entire text to unfold.... a very beautifully written book." —Walter Brogan "... a work that opens new and timely vistas within the Republic.... Her approach... is thorough and rigorous." —John Sallis Although Plato’s Republic is perhaps the most influential text in the history of Western philosophy, Claudia Baracchi finds that the work remains obscure and enigmatic. To fully understand and appreciate its meaning, she argues, (...)
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  36. Larry May, War Crimes and Just War. [REVIEW]Alexander Barder - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28:210-211.
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  37. The Land Ethic: A New Philosophy for International Relations.John Barkdull & Paul G. Harris - 1998 - Ethics and International Affairs 12 (1):159–177.
    Barkdull examines the land ethic in the contexts of just war theory, economic liberalism, and international environmental law, offering a new outlook for the behavior of states in matters affecting ecosystems.
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  38. The Just War.Jonathan Barnes - 1982 - In Norman Kretzmann, Anthony Kenny & Jan Pinborg (eds.), Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 771--783.
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  39. A Challenge to the Reigning Theory of the Just War.Christian Barry - 2011 - International Affairs 87 (2):457-466.
    Troubled times often gives rise to great art that reflects those troubles. So too with political theory. The greatest work of twentieth century political theory, John Rawls's A theory of justice, was inspired in various respects by extreme social and economic inequality, racialized slavery and racial segregation in the United States. Arguably the most influential work of political theory since Rawls—Michael Walzer's Just and unjust wars—a sustained and historically informed reflection on the morality of interstate armed conflict—was written in the (...)
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  40. Just War Theory and the Logic of Reconciliation.Robert Barry - 1980 - New Scholasticism 54 (2):129-152.
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  41. Michael Walzer: "Just and Unjust Wars". [REVIEW]Robert Barry - 1980 - The Thomist 44 (2):310.
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  42. Jus Post Bellum.Gary J. Bass - 2004 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 32 (4):384-412.
  43. Political Terrorism and the Rules of Just War.Per Bauhn - 2004 - In Mark Textor, Andreas Kemmerling & Georg Meggle (eds.), Ethics of Terrorism & Counter-Terrorism. De Gruyter. pp. 123-134.
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  44. Non-Combatant Immunity and War-Profiteering.Saba Bazargan - forthcoming - In Helen Frowe & Lazar Seth (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and War. Oxford University Press.
    The principle of noncombatant immunity prohibits warring parties from intentionally targeting noncombatants. I explicate the moral version of this view and its criticisms by reductive individualists; they argue that certain civilians on the unjust side are morally liable to be lethally targeted to forestall substantial contributions to that war. I then argue that reductivists are mistaken in thinking that causally contributing to an unjust war is a necessary condition for moral liability. Certain noncontributing civilians—notably, war-profiteers—can be morally liable to be (...)
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  45. Defensive Killing, by Frowe, Helen. [REVIEW]Saba Bazargan - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (3):608-611.
  46. Defensive Wars and the Reprisal Dilemma.Saba Bazargan - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (3):583-601.
    I address a foundational problem with accounts of the morality of war that are derived from the Just War Tradition. Such accounts problematically focus on ‘the moment of crisis’: i.e. when a state is considering a resort to war. This is problematic because sometimes the state considering the resort to war is partly responsible for wrongly creating the conditions in which the resort to war becomes necessary. By ignoring this possibility, JWT effectively ignores, in its moral evaluation of wars, certain (...)
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  47. Cosmopolitan War, by Cecile Fabre.Saba Bazargan - 2014 - Mind 123 (490):588-592.
    Book review for Cecile Fabre's 'Cosmopolitan War'.
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  48. Morally Heterogeneous Wars.Saba Bazargan - 2013 - Philosophia 41 (4):959-975.
    According to “epistemic-based contingent pacifism” a) there are virtually no wars which we know to be just, and b) it is morally impermissible to wage a war unless we know that the war is just. Thus it follows that there is no war which we are morally permitted to wage. The first claim (a) seems to follow from widespread disagreement among just war theorists over which wars, historically, have been just. I will argue, however, that a source of our inability (...)
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  49. Complicitous Liability in War.Saba Bazargan - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (1):177-195.
    Jeff McMahan has argued against the moral equivalence of combatants (MEC) by developing a liability-based account of killing in warfare. On this account, a combatant is morally liable to be killed only if doing so is an effective means of reducing or eliminating an unjust threat to which that combatant is contributing. Since combatants fighting for a just cause generally do not contribute to unjust threats, they are not morally liable to be killed; thus MEC is mistaken. The problem, however, (...)
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  50. The Permissibility of Aiding and Abetting Unjust Wars.Saba Bazargan - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):513-529.
    Common sense suggests that if a war is unjust, then there is a strong moral reason not to contribute to it. I argue that this presumption is mistaken. It can be permissible to contribute to an unjust war because, in general, whether it is permissible to perform an act often depends on the alternatives available to the actor. The relevant alternatives available to a government waging a war differ systematically from the relevant alternatives available to individuals in a position to (...)
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