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  1. The Uselessness of Rawls’s “Ideal Theory”.Uwe Steinhoff - manuscript
    Over the years a few authors have argued that Rawls’s ideal theory of justice is useless for the real world. This criticism has been largely ignored by Rawlsians, but in the light of a recent accumulation of such criticisms, some authors (in particular Holly Lawford-Smith, A. John Simmons, Zofia Stemplowska and Laura Valentini) have tried to defend ideal theory. In this article I will recapitulate the precise problem with Rawls’s ideal theory, argue that some of Rawls’s defenders misconceive it, and (...)
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  2. The Best and the Rest: How Ideals Mislead and Distort -- Yet Sharpen -- Comparative Evaluation.David Wiens - manuscript
    Political philosophers sometimes defend the value of idealistic normative theories by arguing that they help specify principles for evaluating feasible solutions to real-world problems. I start by showing that this defense is ambiguous between three interpretations, one of which I show to be a nonstarter. The second interpretation says (roughly) that a description of a normatively ideal society provides a benchmark from which to measure deviations from the ideal; the third says (again, roughly) that a description of a normatively ideal (...)
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  3. Noumenal Power, Reasons, and Justification: A Critique of Forst.Sameer Bajaj & Enzo Rossi - forthcoming - In Ester Herlin-Karnell & Matthias Klatt (eds.), Constitutionalism Justified. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    In this essay we criticise Rainer Forst's attempt to draw a connection between power and justification, and thus ground his normative theory of a right to justification. Forst draws this connection primarily conceptually, though we will also consider whether a normative connection may be drawn within his framework. Forst's key insight is that if we understand power as operating by furnishing those subjected to it with reasons, then we create a space for the normative contestation of any exercise of power. (...)
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  4. Just Disobedience: An Answer to the Question,“Is It Ever Just to Disobey a Law?”.Mike Cameron - forthcoming - Canadian Undergraduate Philosophy Journal Revue Canadienne de Philosophie Étudiante.
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  5. The Psychology of Justice.John M. Cooper - forthcoming - American Philosophical Quarterly.
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  6. Italian Translation and Preface to J.Bohman - Public Deliberation, Pluralism, Complexity and Democracy, MIT Press, Boston: Mass 1996.Claudio Corradetti - forthcoming - ssrn.
    Presentazione del curatore italiano (C.Corradetti): È possibile conciliare il pluralismo culturale con la dimensione pubblica della deliberazione? Partendo dall’analisi critica di Rawls e Habermas, James Bohman offre una risposta innovativa alla questione dell’accordo democratico. In tale proposta, parallelamente al rigetto di soluzioni meramente strategiche, viene riabilitata la nozione di compromesso morale nel quadro di un accordo normativo. Mantenendo fede ad una prospettiva composta da elementi normativi e fattuali, l’autore si propone di ampliare le opportunità democratiche nella riconciliazione tra conflitti culturali (...)
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  7. Educational Adequacy and Educational Equality: A Merging Proposal.Fernando de los Santos Menéndez - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-22.
  8. Affective Injustice and Fundamental Affective Goods.Francisco Gallegos - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    This article proposes a novel conception of affective injustice, according to which affective injustice is a state in which individuals or groups are deprived of “affective goods” which are owed to them. On this basis, I advocate an approach to the philosophical investigation of affective injustice that begins by establishing which affective goods are fundamental, and then considers which subsidiary goods—such as freedoms, resources, opportunities, and forms of recognition—may be necessary for the provision of those fundamental affective goods. Drawing from (...)
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  9. La Part de Responsabilité Individuelle Dans les Inégalités Sociales. Problèmes Théoriques Et Intuitions Largement Partagées.De Ge - forthcoming - In Quels fondements pour la sécurité sociale en Belgique ? Actes des XIXe Journées d'études juridiques Jean Dabin. Louvain-la-Neuve, 15-17 décembre 2005 ». Bruylant.
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  10. Mental Illness Stigma and Epistemic Credibility in Advance.Abigail Gosselin - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
  11. Introduction for Book Symposium on Andrea Sangiovanni’s Humanity Without Dignity.Johannes Haaf, Jan-Philipp Kruse & Luise K. Müller - forthcoming - European Journal of Political Theory:147488511989007.
    European Journal of Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
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  12. The Stability of the Just Society: Why Fixed Point Theorems Are Beside The Point.Sean Ingham & David Wiens - forthcoming - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy:1-8.
    Political theorists study the attributes of desirable social-moral states of affairs. Schaefer (forthcoming) aims to show that "static political theory" of this kind rests on shaky foundations. His argument revolves around an application of an abstruse mathematical theorem -- Kakutani's fixed point theorem -- to the social-moral domain. We show that Schaefer has misunderstood the implications of this theorem for political theory. Theorists who wish to study the attributes of social-moral states of affairs should carry on, safe in the knowledge (...)
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  13. Political Justice and the Capability for Responsibility.Yuko Kamishima - forthcoming - Tandf: Critical Horizons:1-16.
  14. Extending Voice and Autonomy Through Participatory Action Research: Ethical and Practical IssuesReflections on a Workshop Held at Durham University, November 2018.Sui Ting Kong, Sarah Banks, Toby Brandon, Stewart Chappell, Helen Charnley, Se Kwang Hwang, Danielle Rudd, Sue Shaw, Sam Slatcher & Nicki Ward - forthcoming - Ethics and Social Welfare:1-10.
  15. Responsibility for Global Poverty.Judith Lichtenberg - forthcoming - In Sombetzki Heidbrink (ed.), Handbook of Responsibility. Springer.
    This paper has two aims. The first is to describe several sources of the moral responsibility to remedy or alleviate global poverty—reasons why an agent might have such a responsibility. The second is to consider what sorts of agents bear the responsibilities associated with each source—in particular, whether they are collective agents like states, societies, or corporations, on the one hand, or individual human beings on the other. We often talk about our responsibilities to the poorest people in the world, (...)
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  16. Global Gender Justice: Human Rights and Political Responsibility.Margaret A. McLaren - forthcoming - Tandf: Critical Horizons:1-18.
  17. Partial Desert.Tamler Sommers - forthcoming - In David Shoemaker (ed.), Oxford Studies in Agency and Responsibility. Oxford University Press.
    Theories of moral desert focus only on the personal culpability of the agent to determine the amount of blame and punishment the agent deserves. I defend an alternative account of desert, one that does not focus only facts about offenders and their offenses. In this revised framework, personal culpability can do no more than set upper and lower limits for deserved blame and punishment. For more precise judgments within that spectrum, additional factors must be considered, factors that are independent of (...)
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  18. Categorical Injustice.Ásta Sveinsdóttir - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
  19. Boredom and Poverty: A Theoretical Model.Andreas Elpidorou - 2022 - In The Moral Psychology of Boredom. London: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 171-208.
    The aim of this chapter is to articulate the ways in which our social standing, and particularly our socio-economic status (SES), affects, even transforms, the experience of boredom. Even if boredom can be said to be democratic, in the sense that it can potentially affect all of us, it does not actually affect all of us in the same way. Boredom, I argue, is unjust—some groups are disproportionately negatively impacted by boredom through no fault of their own. Depending on our (...)
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  20. Against the Anticosmopolitan Basic Structure Argument: The Systemic Concept of Distributive Justice and Economic Divisions of Labor.Edward Andrew Greetis - 2022 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 25 (4):551-571.
    I examine the main anticosmopolitan Rawslian argument, the ‘basic structure argument.’ It holds that distributive justice only applies to existing basic structures, there are only state basic structures, so distributive justice only applies among compatriots. Proponents of the argument face three challenges: 1) they must explain what type of basic structure relation makes distributive justice relevant only among compatriots, 2) they must explain why distributive justice (as opposed to allocative or retributive) is the relevant regulative concept for basic structures, and (...)
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  21. What Price Are We Willing to Pay for the Dream of Equal Justice?†.Andrew Higgins - 2022 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 42 (1):325-344.
    The injustices wrought by unequal access to the legal system pose a direct threat to the rule of law, yet such injustices are widespread in England and elsewhere. Lawyers regularly criticise governments for a lack of funding for the legal system, but the private market for delivering legal services receives much less scrutiny. A private market for legal resources is antithetical to equal justice because it makes the outcome of cases turn on arbitrary factors such as wealth. The solution, according (...)
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  22. From ‘fugitive democracy’ to ‘fugitive justice’: Cultivating a democratic ethos.Caleb J. Basnett - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (1):119-140.
    Sheldon S. Wolin’s ‘fugitive democracy’ is arguably his most provocative contribution to political theory. Breaking with the understanding of democracy as a constitutional form whose origins he locates in the work of Aristotle, Wolin claims democracy is better understood not as a constitution, but as a ‘rebellious moment,’ making democracy dependent on cultural rather than institutional characteristics. This formulation poses a problem for democracy as a political phenomenon, as political power today tends to be concentrated within institutions. Without institutional expression, (...)
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  23. James Baldwin and the Politics of White Identity.Mark B. Brown - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (1):1-22.
    Efforts to develop a coherent role for white people in racial justice initiatives in the USA are often stymied by the defensiveness, paternalism, and guilt of many white liberals. Such efforts are also undermined by critiques of whiteness that conflate white identity and white supremacy. I address this dilemma by developing an account of antiracist white identity politics, conceived of here as taking responsibility for the effects of being socially defined as white. I locate conceptual resources for this project in (...)
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  24. What Makes Epistemic Injustice an “Injustice”?Morten Fibieger Byskov - 2021 - Journal of Social Philosophy 52 (1):114-131.
  25. What Liberals Should Tolerate Internationally.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):64-86.
    The purpose of this paper is to shed light on what liberal states should tolerate outside their borders. This requires definitions of `liberalism, ́ `toleration, ́ and `state. ́ In the first section of this paper, I briefly indicate how I use those and other terms necessary to the discussion and introduce the normative principle I take liberals to be committed to. In the second section, I continue clearing the path for the rest of my discussion. In the rest of (...)
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  26. The prevention of torture: An ecological approach.Romand Coles - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (2):86-89.
  27. The Politics and Ethics of Toleration: Introduction.Johannes Drerup & Michael Kühler - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):1-4.
  28. Public Property, Collective Integrity, and Environmental Justice.Elisabeth Ellis - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (4):650-656.
  29. Climate Change Driven Displacement and Justice.Kyle Fruh - 2021 - Essays in Philosophy 22 (1-2):102-121.
    An increasingly wide array of moral arguments has coalesced in recent work on the question of how to confront the phenomenon of climate change driven displacement. Despite invoking a range of disparate moral principles, arguments addressing displacement across international borders seem to converge on a similar range of policy remedies: expansion of the 1951 Refugee Convention to include ecological refugees, expedited immigration, or, for entire political communities that have suffered displacement, even the ceding of sovereign territory. Curiously, this convergence is (...)
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  30. Child-Rearing With Minimal Domination: A Republican Account.Anca Gheaus - 2021 - Political Studies 69 (3).
    Parenting involves an extraordinary degree of power over children. Republicans are concerned about domination, which, on one view, is the holding of power that fails to track the interests of those over whom it is exercised. On this account, parenting as we know it is dominating due to the low standards necessary for acquiring and retaining parental rights and the extent of parental power. Domination cannot be fully eliminated from child-rearing without unacceptable loss of value. Most likely, republicanism requires that (...)
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  31. Toleration and Modus Vivendi.John Horton - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):45-63.
  32. Can a Value-Neutral Liberal State Still Be Tolerant?Michael Kühler - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):25-44.
  33. Free to Be You and Me: An Introduction to Ghosh’s De-Moralizing Gay Rights.Patti Tamara Lenard - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (7):1048-1055.
  34. Blake, Michael. Justice, Migration, and Mercy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. Pp. 280. $35.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Matthew Lister - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):600-605.
    For several years Michael Blake has been among the most important contributors to the philosophical literature on immigration. This book is therefore greatly anticipated, and develops a number of fruitful arguments. Although I will argue that the account is unsuccessful or incomplete at key points, it’s clearly an important work of relevance to those working on immigration, as well as to political philosophers more generally. In particular, Blake provides powerful arguments against the claim that “open borders” are required by liberal (...)
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  35. But Anyone Can Mix Their Labor: A Reply to Cheneval.Jakob Thrane Mainz - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (2):276-285.
  36. The People’s Integrity and Property – a Reply to My Critics.Shmuel Nili - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (4):657-666.
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  37. Unjust History and Its New Reproduction—A Reply to My Critics.Alasia Nuti - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (5):1245-1259.
    Demands calling for reparations for historical injustices—injustices whose original victims and perpetrators are now dead—constitute an important component of contemporary struggles for social and transnational justice. Reparations are only one way in which the unjust past is salient in contemporary politics. In my book, Injustice and the Reproduction of History: Structural Inequalities, Gender and Redress, I put forward a framework to conceptualise the normative significance of the unjust past. In this article, I will engage with the insightful comments and try (...)
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  38. Solidarity and The Politics of Redress: Structural Injustice, History and Counter-Finalities.David Owen - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (5):1213-1227.
    This paper examines Nuti’s accounts of structural injustice and historical injustice in the light of a political dilemma that confronted Young’s work on structure injustice. The dilemma emerges from a paradox that can be stated simply: justly addressing structural injustice would require that those subject to structural injustice enjoy the kind of privileged position of decision-making power that their being subject to structural injustice denies them. The dilemma thus concerns how to justly address structural injustice. I argue that Nuti’s account (...)
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  39. John Rawls: The path to a theory of justice.Michael A. Richards - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (2):71-74.
  40. The Significance of Being Gay in Ghosh’s De-Moralizing Gay Rights.Kerri Woods - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (7):1076-1082.
  41. What Vulnerability Entails: Sustainability and the Limits of Political Pluralism.Didier Zúñiga - 2021 - Constellations 28 (3):432-446.
    Pluralism and diversity are largely bound to a humancentric conception of difference, one which fails to consider the plurality of ontologies that constitute reality. The result has been the confinement of the subject of justice to social spaces, and hence the reinforcement of the dichotomous understanding of humanity and nature. This is in part because pluralist theories are largely concerned with one single manifestation of vulnerability: the vulnerability of minority groups. This essay begins by offering a distinctive definition of vulnerability, (...)
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  42. Deliberative Sincerity and the Opacity of the Self.Erik A. Anderson - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (3):422-440.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  43. Racial Conflation: Agency, Black Action, and Criminal Intent.Alisa Bierria - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy.
  44. Naming and Sharing Power in Prison Workshop Settings.Margo Campbell, Anne Dalke & Barb Toews - 2020 - Ethics and Social Welfare 14 (1):105-117.
  45. Transformative Disruptions and Collective Knowledge Building: Social Work Professors Building Anti-Oppressive Ethical Frameworks for Research, Teaching, Practice and Activism.Roxane Caron, Edward Ou Jin Lee & Annie Pullen Sansfaçon - 2020 - Ethics and Social Welfare 14 (3):298-314.
  46. Justice Through a Multispecies Lens.Danielle Celermajer, Sria Chatterjee, Alasdair Cochrane, Stefanie Fishel, Astrida Neimanis, Anne O’Brien, Susan Reid, Krithika Srinivasan, David Schlosberg & Anik Waldow - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (3):475-512.
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  47. The Good of Toleration: Changing Social Relations or Maximising Individual Freedom?Emanuela Ceva - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (2):197-202.
    In this paper, I take issue with Peter Balint’s recent account of the value of toleration as an instrument for securing freedom-maximising outcomes in pluralistic societies. In particular, I question the extent to which the ideal of toleration can be entirely reduced to someone’s intentional withholding of negative interference whose value lies in the protection of individual negative freedoms. I argue that couching the value of toleration entirely in these freedom-maximising terms fails to do justice to the relational value of (...)
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  48. The Devil in the Details.Nicholas Colgrove - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (12):18-20.
    McCarthy et al.’s proposal gains much of its plausibility by relying on a superficial treatment of justice, human dignity, sin, and the common good within the Christian tradition. Upon closer inspection of what these terms mean within the context of Christianity, it becomes clear that despite using the same phrases (e.g., a commitment to “protecting vulnerable populations,” the goal of “promoting justice,” etc.) contemporary secular bioethical goals are often deeply at odds with goals of Christian bioethics. So, while the authors (...)
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  49. Complicity and Hypocrisy.Nicolas Cornell & Amy Sepinwall - 2020 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 19 (2):154-181.
    This article offers a justification for accommodating claims of conscience. The standard justification points to the pain that acting against one’s conscience entails. But that defense cannot make sense of the state’s refusal to accommodate individuals where the law interferes with their deeply meaningful but nonmoral projects. An alternative justification, we argue, arises once one recognizes the connection between conscience and moral address: One’s lived moral convictions determine when and with what force one can hold others to account. Acting against (...)
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  50. Species-being for whom? The five faces of interspecies oppression.Mathieu Dubeau - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (4):596-620.
    There is now an awakening to and recognition of the emotionally complex lives of some non-human animals. While their forms of consciousness may vary, some are indeed conscious and deserve political consideration. What that political consideration ought to be is the central topic of this article. First, I argue that interspecies justice must be understood in terms of the relationships that foster individual flourishing of all concerned. The obstacles to such flourishing are the five faces of oppression famously identified by (...)
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