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Introductions See Cruft et al 2015:The Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights: An Overview.
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66 found
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  1. added 2020-09-11
    The Wrongness of Killing.Rainer Ebert - 2016 - Dissertation, Rice University
    There are few moral convictions that enjoy the same intuitive plausibility and level of acceptance both within and across nations, cultures, and traditions as the conviction that, normally, it is morally wrong to kill people. Attempts to provide a philosophical explanation of why that is so broadly fall into three groups: Consequentialists argue that killing is morally wrong, when it is wrong, because of the harm it inflicts on society in general, or the victim in particular, whereas personhood and human (...)
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  2. added 2020-08-26
    Suicidio per democrazia – un necrologio per l'America e il mondo (2019).Michael Richard Starks - 2020 - In Benvenuti all'inferno sulla Terra: Bambini, Cambiamenti climatici, Bitcoin, Cartelli, Cina, Democrazia, Diversità, Disgenetica, Uguaglianza, Pirati Informatici, Diritti umani, Islam, Liberalismo, Prosperità, Web, Caos, Fame, Malattia, Violenza, Intellig. Las Vegas, NV, USA: Reality Press. pp. 282-324.
    L'America e il mondo sono in procinto di collassare a causa dell'eccessiva crescita demografica, la maggior parte per il secolo scorso, e ora tutto questo, a causa della gente del terzo mondo. Il consumo di risorse e l'aggiunta di altri 4 miliardi di ca. 2100 crolleranno la civiltà industriale e porterà alla fame, alle malattie, alla violenza e alla guerra su scala impressionante. La terra perde almeno l'1% del suo suolo superiore ogni anno, così come si avvicina a 2100, la (...)
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  3. added 2020-08-02
    Are International Human Rights Universal? – East-West Philosophical Debates on Human Rights to Liberty and Health.Benedict S. B. Chan - 2019 - In Luca Di Donato & Elisa Grimi (eds.), Metaphysics of Human Rights 1948-2018: On the Occasion of the 70th Anniversary of the UDHR. Málaga, Spain: pp. 135-152.
    In philosophical debates on human rights between the East and the West, scholars argue whether rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and other international documents (in short, “international human rights”) are universal or culturally relative. Some scholars who emphasize the importance of East Asian cultures (such as the Confucian tradition) have different attitudes toward civil and political rights (CP rights) than toward economic, social, and cultural rights (ESC Rights). They argue that at least some international human rights (...)
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  4. added 2020-06-12
    Praxis und Idee im Widerstreit. Naturalismus, Konstruktivismus und Dekonstruktivismus in der Philosophie der Menschenrechte.Markus Wolf - 2019 - In Peter Wiersbinski, Martin Weichold, Jan Marschelke, Falk Hamann, Matthias Kopp & Dennis-Kenji Kipker (eds.), Der normative Druck des Faktischen (Archiv für Rechts- und Sozialphilosophie (ARSP): Beihefte; Neue Folge, 156). Stuttgart, Deutschland: pp. S. 229 - 245.
    Sind die Menschenrechte primär Ausdruck einer politischen Praxis und die Idee der Menschenrechte eine Art „Überbau“, den die Praxis epiphänomenal hervorbringt? Oder ist die Praxis der Menschenrechte das Ergebnis der Verwirklichung einer normativen Idee, die unabhängig von ihr existiert? Ist die Idee der Menschenrechte die Bedingung dafür, dass es die Praxis der Menschenrechte geben kann? Oder gibt es einen Vorrang der Praxis vor der Idee? In meinem Aufsatz argumentiere ich für zwei These: 1. These: Menschenrechte sind prinzipiell unabhängig von jeder (...)
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  5. added 2020-03-24
    Total Collapse: The Case Against Responsibility and Morality.Stephen Kershnar - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
    Moral responsibility and morality lie at the heart of how we view the world. In our daily life, we feel responsibility-related emotions: gratitude, pride, love, forgiveness, resentment, indignation, and shame. We love those who freely and reciprocally love us. Also, we feel that people act rightly or wrongly, make the world better or worse, and are virtuous or vicious. These policies are central to our justifying how we see the world and treat others. In this book, I argue that our (...)
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  6. added 2019-12-05
    Crime Against Dalits and Indigenous Peoples as an International Human Rights Issue.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2015 - In Proceedings of National Seminar on Human Rights of Marginalised Groups: Understanding and Rethinking Strategies. Patiala: pp. 214-225.
    In India, Dalits faced a centuries-old caste-based discrimination and nowadays indigenous people too are getting a threat from so called developed society. We can define these crimes with the term ‘atrocity’ means an extremely wicked or cruel act, typically one involving physical violence or injury. Caste-related violence has occurred and occurs in India in various forms. Though the Constitution of India has laid down certain safeguards to ensure welfare, protection and development, there is gross violation of their rights such as (...)
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  7. added 2019-11-08
    From Concept to Conceptions: Can the Broad View Overcome the Debate Between Orthodox and Political Theories of Human Rights?Daniel P. Corrigan - 2019 - European Journal of Political Theory 19 (3):417-425.
    In Humanity without Dignity, Sangiovanni offers an interesting new approach to human rights theory called the “Broad View” of human rights. The BV involves an innovative attempt to overcome th...
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  8. added 2019-10-04
    Review of Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao, and Massimo Renzo (Eds.), Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. [REVIEW]Robert Mark Simpson - 2019 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 16 (4):517-520.
    This is a review of a long, comprehensive, and mostly very good collection of philosophical essays on human rights. I briefly summarise the main ideas put forward in some of the essays that I most admired in the collection. While the collection includes essays from proponents of a wide range of theoretical and methodological perspectives, I suggest in my review that the collection's overall function is to serve as a kind of demonstrative rejoinder to those philosophers, like Raz, who argue (...)
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  9. added 2019-06-27
    Suicide by Democracy - an Obituary for America and the World 3rd Edition.Michael Starks - 2019 - Las Vegas, NV USA: Reality Press.
    America and the world are in the process of collapse from excessive population growth, most of it for the last century, and now all of it, due to 3rd world people. Consumption of resources and the addition of 4 billion more ca. 2100 will collapse industrial civilization and bring about starvation, disease, violence and war on a staggering scale. The earth loses at least 1% of its topsoil every year, so as it nears 2100, most of its food growing capacity (...)
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  10. added 2019-03-18
    Justifying International Legal Human Rights.Jesse Tomalty - 2016 - Ethics and International Affairs 30 (4):483-490.
    In The Heart of Human Rights, Allen Buchanan emphasizes the distinction between moral human rights (MHRs) on the one hand and international legal human rights (ILHRs) on the other. MHRs are the moral rights held universally by all humans simply in virtue of being human. ILHRs are the legal rights of international practice, which are articulated in the United Nations’ International Bill of Rights and related legal documents. One of the most controversial aspects of Buchanan’s account of human rights is (...)
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  11. added 2019-03-18
    The Force of the Claimability Objection to the Human Right to Subsistence.Jesse Tomalty - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):1-17.
    The claimability objection rejects the inclusion of a right to subsistence among human rights because the duties thought to correlate with this right are undirected, and thus it is not claimable. This objection is open to two replies: One denies that claimability is an existence condition on rights. The second suggests that the human right to subsistence actually is claimable. I argue that although neither reply succeeds on the conventional interpretation of the human right to subsistence, an alternative ‘practical’ interpretation (...)
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  12. added 2019-01-17
    Humanism and Cruelty in Williams.Lorenzo Greco - 2018 - In Sophie Grace Chappell & Marcel van Ackeren (eds.), Ethics Beyond the Limits: New Essays on Bernard Williams' Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy. London-New York: Routledge. pp. 84-103.
  13. added 2019-01-04
    When the Practice Gets Complicated: Human Rights, Migrants, and Political Institutions.Jelena Belic - 2017 - In Reidar Maliks & Johan Schaffer (eds.), Moral and Political Conceptions of Human Rights: Implications for Theory and Practice. pp. 181 - 203.
  14. added 2019-01-04
    The Review of "Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights". [REVIEW]Jelena Belic - 2016 - Public Law 4:741 - 745.
  15. added 2018-12-22
    Inherent Dignity, Contingent Dignity and Human Rights: Solving the Puzzle of the Protection of Dignity.Jan-Willem van der Rijt - 2017 - Erkenntnis 82 (6):1321-1338.
    Dignity is often invoked as the basis of human rights. The precise relation between dignity and human rights remains objectionably obscure, however, and many appeals to dignity seem little more than hand-waving, as critics have pointed out. This vagueness is potentially damning for contemporary human rights accounts, as it calls into question whether dignity can truly serve as the foundation of human rights. In order to defend the view that human rights are grounded in human dignity, this paper presents a (...)
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  16. added 2018-08-30
    Direito de excluir ou dever de acolher? A migração forçada como questão ética.Paolo Gomarasca - 2017 - REMHU 50 (25):11-24.
    The first aim of this paper is to examine if and why the European reaction to the migration crisis of 2015 can be considered anti-ethical. In order to argue this, the paper discusses the Global Approach to Migration and Mobility (GAMM), which since 2005 has been the EU's overall framework for migration and asylum policies. The second aim of the paper is to justify that an ethics of migration is possible, arguing in favor of the thesis that caring for refugees (...)
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  17. added 2018-06-04
    Human Dignity and Human Rights.Pablo Gilabert - 2018 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Human dignity: social movements invoke it, several national constitutions enshrine it, and it features prominently in international human rights documents. But what is human dignity, why is it important, and what is its relationship to human rights? -/- This book offers a sophisticated and comprehensive defence of the view that human dignity is the moral heart of human rights. First, it clarifies the network of concepts associated with dignity. Paramount within this network is a core notion of human dignity as (...)
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  18. added 2018-02-23
    Defining Dignity and Its Place in Human Rights.Lucy Michael - 2014 - The New Bioethics 20 (1):12-34.
    The concept of dignity is widely used in society, particularly in reference to human rights law and bioethics. Several conceptions of dignity are identified, falling broadly within two categories: full inherent dignity (FID) and non- inherent dignity (NID). FID is a quality belonging equally to every being with full moral status, including all members of the human natural kind; it is permanent, unconditional, indivisible and inviolable. Those beings with FID ought to be treated deferentially by others by virtue of their (...)
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  19. added 2017-10-30
    Against Wolterstorff's Theistic Attempt to Ground Human Rights.David Redmond - 2017 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 12 (1):127-134.
    This article responds to Nicholas Wolterstorff's attempt to ground human rights in the condition of being loved by God.
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  20. added 2017-09-03
    Human Rights: A Modest Proposal.Michael Byron - 2009 - Etica E Politica 11 (1):470-494.
    Human rights have become an enormously useful tool in our time, and this for a variety of reasons. Useful, yes: but are rights real? I propose first to examine the most significant philosophical attempts to justify human rights. A universally justified conception of rights I call ‘robust,’ since a successful rational justification would fully underwrite the real existence of rights. Alas, we have no such justification; the second part of my remarks sketches devastating objections to each proposed justification. But all (...)
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  21. added 2017-07-28
    Dignity: A History.Remy Debes (ed.) - 2017 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    In everything from philosophical ethics to legal argument to public activism, it has become commonplace to appeal to the idea of human dignity. In such contexts, the concept of dignity typically signifies something like the fundamental moral status belonging to all humans. Remarkably, however, it is only in the last century that this meaning of the term has become standardized. Before this, dignity was instead a concept associated with social status. Unfortunately, this transformation remains something of a mystery in existing (...)
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  22. added 2017-07-13
    Humanity Without Dignity: Moral Equality, Respect, and Human Rights.Andrea Sangiovanni - 2017 - Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
    Name any valued human trait—intelligence, wit, charm, grace, strength—and you will find an inexhaustible variety and complexity in its expression among individuals. Yet we insist that such diversity does not provide grounds for differential treatment at the most basic level. Whatever merit, blame, praise, love, or hate we receive as beings with a particular past and a particular constitution, we are always and everywhere due equal respect merely as persons. -/- But why? Most who attempt to answer this question appeal (...)
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  23. added 2017-06-02
    Grounding Human Rights in Natural Law.John Finnis - 2015 - American Journal of Jurisprudence 60 (2):199-225.
  24. added 2017-06-02
    Grounding Human Rights.David Miller - 2012 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (4):407-427.
    This paper examines the idea of human rights, and how they should be justified. It begins by reviewing Peter Jones?s claim that the purpose of human rights is to allow people from different cultural backgrounds to live together as equals, and suggests that this by itself provides too slender a basis. Instead it proposes that human rights should be grounded on human needs. Three difficulties with this proposal are considered. The first is the problem of whether needs are sufficiently objective (...)
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  25. added 2017-05-25
    A Dilemma for Wolterstorff’s Theistic Grounding of Human Dignity and Rights.Jordan Wessling - 2014 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (3):277-295.
    In a number of recent works, Nicholas Wolterstorff defends the claim that human rights inhere in the dignity of every human. He further contends that the explanation of this dignity cannot be found in the intrinsic features of humans; rather, the only plausible explanation for human dignity is that it is bestowed upon humans by God’s love. In this paper, I argue that Wolterstorff’s theory concerning the ground of human dignity falls prey to something quite similar to the classic Euthyphro (...)
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  26. added 2017-05-25
    Does He Pull It Off? A Theistic Grounding of Natural Inherent Human Rights?Richard J. Bernstein - 2009 - Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):221-241.
    This paper focuses on two key issues in Nicholas Wolterstorff's Justice: Rights and Wrongs . It argues that Wolterstorff's theistic grounding of inherent rights is not successful. It also argues that Wolterstorff does not provide adequate criteria for determining what exactly these natural inherent rights are or criteria that can help us to evaluate competing and contradictory claims about these rights. However, most of Wolterstorff's book is not concerned with the theistic grounding of inherent rights. Instead, it is devoted to (...)
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  27. added 2017-02-22
    Paradigms of International Human Rights Law.Aaron Xavier Fellmeth - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Paradigms of International Human Rights Law explores the legal, ethical, and other policy consequences of three core structural features of international human rights law: the focus on individual rights instead of duties; the division of rights into substantive and nondiscrimination categories; and the use of positive and negative right paradigms. Part I explains the types of individual, corporate, and state duties available, and analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of incorporating each type of duty into the world public order, with special (...)
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  28. added 2017-02-22
    Is Democracy a Human Right?Tom Campbell - 2015 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):107-126.
    After dealing with some methodological and definitional questions aimed at justifying its focus on bringing out the practical consequences of adopting democracy as a human right, in Part 3 the paper outlines and criticises arguments commonly made against having such a human right. It distinguishes between those arguments that deal with: alleged conceptual inadequacies, such as that democracy does not satisfy defining criteria for human rights, such as universality, importance and intrinsic worth, political doubts relating to the practicality of ‘self-determination’ (...)
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  29. added 2017-02-22
    Human Rights and Human Dignity: A Reply to Doris Schroeder. [REVIEW]Peter Schaber - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (1):155-161.
    According to Doris Schroeder, the view that human rights derive from human dignity should be rejected. She thinks that this is the case for three different reasons: the first has to do with the fact that the dominant concept of dignity is based on religious beliefs which will do no justificatory work in a secular society; the second is that the dominant secular view of dignity, which is the Kantian view, does not provide us with a justification of human rights, (...)
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  30. added 2017-02-22
    Justifying Human Rights: Does Consensus Matter?Eun-Jung Katherine Kim - 2012 - Human Rights Review 13 (3):261-278.
    This paper is a critical examination of a widely accepted method of human rights justification. The method defends the universality of human rights by appeal to diverse worldviews that converge on human rights norms. By showing that the norms can be justified from the perspective of diverse worldviews, human rights theorists suggest that there is reason to believe that human rights are universal norms that should govern the institutions of all societies. This paper argues that the evidence of plural foundations (...)
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  31. added 2017-02-22
    On Justifying Human Rights.John-Stewart Gordon - 2011 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), The Morality and Global Justice Reader. Westview Press. pp. 27--49.
  32. added 2017-02-22
    Natural Rights Human Rights and the Role of Social Recognition.Rex Martin - 2011 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 17 (1):91-115.
    This paper pays special attention to T.H. Green's account of rights as developed in the Lectures on the Principles of Political Obligation. Green's theory can be viewed as having at least two main levels. The first level is his general account of rights, emphasizing the notions of social recognition, of a power or capacity that each right-holder has, and of the common good subserved by proper rights. The second level is that of universal rights; here special attention will be paid (...)
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  33. added 2017-02-22
    Kamm and Miller on Rights' Compatibility.Rowan Cruft - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):393 - 401.
    In their recent books, National Responsibility and Global Justice (2007) and Intricate Ethics (2007), David Miller and Frances Kamm give two similar arguments aimed at preventing their favoured accounts of the moral justification of rights from justifying an excess of demanding assistance rights. Both arguments appeal to the fact that a proliferation of assistance rights would conflict with other rights. In this paper, I show that these arguments fail. As Miller recognises in a footnote, the failure of such arguments appears (...)
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  34. added 2017-02-22
    The Idea of Human Rights.Charles R. Beitz - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Human rights have become one of the most important moral concepts in global political life over the last 60 years. Charles Beitz, one of the world's leading philosophers, offers a compelling new examination of the idea of a human right.
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  35. added 2017-02-22
    A Defense of Welfare Rights as Human Rights.James Nickel - 2009 - In Thomas Christiano & John Philip Christman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Political Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 17--437.
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  36. added 2017-02-22
    On Human Rights.James Griffin - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    It is our job now - the job of this book - to influence and develop the unsettled discourse of human rights so as to complete the incomplete idea.
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  37. added 2017-02-22
    The Possibility of Secular Human Rights: Alan Gewirth and the Principle of Generic Consistency.Ari Kohen - 2005 - Human Rights Review 7 (1):49-75.
    This article explores Alan Gewirth’s argument for a secular foundation for the idea 2 of human rights as a possible response to Michael J. Perry’s claim “that the idea of 3 human rights is…ineliminably religious.” I examine Gewirth’s reasoning for constructing 3 a theory, namely that existing theories are fundamentally flawed and leave the idea of human rights without a logically consistent foundation, before considering in detail his claims for the Principle of Generic Consistency . Having looked at his critique (...)
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  38. added 2017-02-22
    Poverty and Rights.James W. Nickel - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (220):385–402.
    I defend economic and social rights as human rights, and as a feasible approach to addressing world poverty. I propose a modest conception of economic and social rights that includes rights to subsistence, basic health care and basic education. The second part of the paper defends these three rights. I begin by sketching a pluralistic justificatory framework that starts with abstract norms pertaining to life, leading a life, avoiding severely cruel treatment, and avoiding severe unfairness. I argue that economic and (...)
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  39. added 2017-02-22
    Between Political Liberalism and Postnational Cosmopolitanism: Toward an Alternative Theory of Human Rights.David Ingram - 2003 - Philosophy Today 31 (3):359-391.
    It is well known that Rawls and Habermas propose different strategies for justifying and classifying human rights. The author argues that neither approach satisfies what he regards as threshold conditions of determinacy, rank ordering, and completeness that any enforceable system of human rights must possess. A related concern is that neither develops an adequate account of group rights, which the author argues fulfills subsidiary conditions for realizing human rights under specific conditions. This latter defect is especially serious in light of (...)
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  40. added 2017-02-22
    The Justificatory Argument for Human Rights.Alan Gewirth - 2000 - In James P. Sterba (ed.), Ethics: Classical Western Texts in Feminist and Multicultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press. pp. 489--94.
  41. added 2017-02-22
    Making Sense of Human Rights.James W. Nickel - 1987 - University of California Press.
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  42. added 2017-02-22
    Why There Are Human Rights.Alan Gewirth - 1985 - Social Theory and Practice 11 (2):235-248.
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  43. added 2017-02-21
    The Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights: An Overview.Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo - 2015 - In Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (eds.), Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 1-44.
    The introduction introduces the history of the concept of human rights and its philosophical genealogy. It raises questions of the nature of human rights, the grounds of human rights, difference between proposed and actual human rights, and scepticism surrounding the very idea of human rights. In the course of this discussion, it concludes that the diversity of positions on human rights is a sign of the intellectual, cultural, and political fertility of the notion of human rights. The chapter concludes with (...)
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  44. added 2017-02-17
    Consequentialism and Human Rights.William J. Talbott - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (11):1030-1040.
    The article begins with a review of the structural differences between act consequentialist theories and human rights theories, as illustrated by Amartya Sen's paradox of the Paretian liberal and Robert Nozick's utilitarianism of rights. It discusses attempts to resolve those structural differences by moving to a second-order or indirect consequentialism, illustrated by J.S. Mill and Derek Parfit. It presents consequentialist (though not utilitarian) interpretations of the contractualist theories of Jürgen Habermas and the early John Rawls (Theory of Justice) and of (...)
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  45. added 2017-02-17
    Human Rights and Human Dignity: An Appeal to Separate the Conjoined Twins.Doris Schroeder - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):323-335.
    Why should all human beings have certain rights simply by virtue of being human? One justification is an appeal to religious authority. However, in increasingly secular societies this approach has its limits. An alternative answer is that human rights are justified through human dignity. This paper argues that human rights and human dignity are better separated for three reasons. First, the justification paradox: the concept of human dignity does not solve the justification problem for human rights but rather aggravates it (...)
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  46. added 2017-02-17
    Human Rights Without Foundations.Joseph Raz - 2010 - In J. Tasioulas & S. Besson (eds.), The Philosphy of International Law. Oxford University Press.
    Using the accounts of Gewirth and Griffin as examples, the article criticises accounts of human rights as those are understood in human rights practices, which regard them as rights all human beings have in virtue of their humanity. Instead it suggests that (with Rawls) human rights set the limits to the sovereignty of the state, but criticises Rawls conflation of sovereignty with legitimate authority. The resulting conception takes human rights, like other rights, to be contingent on social conditions, and in (...)
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  47. added 2017-02-17
    Human Rights and Human Well-Being.William Talbott - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    The consequentialist project for human rights -- Exceptions to libertarian natural rights -- The main principle -- What is well-being? What is equity? -- The two deepest mysteries in moral philosophy -- Security rights -- Epistemological foundations for the priority of autonomy rights -- The millian epistemological argument for autonomy rights -- Property rights, contract rights, and other economic rights -- Democratic rights -- Equity rights -- The most reliable judgment standard for weak paternalism -- Liberty rights and privacy rights (...)
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  48. added 2017-02-13
    Filosofía y Derechos Humanos.Elías Castro Blanco (ed.) - 2013 - Bogota: Universidad Libre.
    Examines the role of philosophical analysis for the understanding and realization of human rights. Relies on two historical events: the framing of the universal declaration of human rights and recent emphasis on global justice. Suggests that power and moral authority of human rights does not depend on a previous thorough consideration of this notion, and also that this authority is not compatible with any theory. Argues also that philosophical analysis is important for the understanding of the idea of global justice (...)
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  49. added 2016-12-12
    Which Rights Should Be Universal?William J. Talbott - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    "We hold these truths to be self-evident..." So begins the U.S. Declaration of Independence. What follows those words is a ringing endorsement of universal rights, but it is far from self-evident. Why did the authors claim that it was? William Talbott suggests that they were trapped by a presupposition of Enlightenment philosophy: That there was only one way to rationally justify universal truths, by proving them from self-evident premises. With the benefit of hindsight, it is clear that the authors of (...)
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  50. added 2016-12-05
    Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights.Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (eds.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    What makes something a human right? What is the relationship between the moral foundations of human rights and human rights law? What are the difficulties of appealing to human rights? This book offers the first comprehensive survey of current thinking on the philosophical foundations of human rights. Divided into four parts, this book focuses firstly on the moral grounds of human rights, for example in our dignity, agency, interests or needs. Secondly, it looks at the implications that different moral perspectives (...)
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