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  1. added 2018-12-11
    Epistemic Normativity in Kant's “Second Analogy”.James Hutton - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    In the “Second Analogy,” Kant argues that, unless mental contents involve the concept of causation, they cannot represent an objective temporal sequence. According to Kant, deploying the concept of causation renders a certain temporal ordering of representations necessary, thus enabling objective representational purport. One exegetical question that remains controversial is this: how, and in what sense, does deploying the concept of cause render a certain ordering of representations necessary? I argue that this necessitation is a matter of epistemic normativity: with (...)
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  2. added 2018-12-08
    Kant on the Necessity of Causal Relations.Toni Kannisto - 2017 - Kant-Studien 108 (4):495-516.
    There are two traditional ways to read Kant's claim that every event necessarily has a cause: the weaker every-event some-cause and the stronger same-cause same-effect causal principles. The focus of the debate about whether and where he subscribes to the SCP has been in the Analogies in the Critique of Pure Reason and in the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science. By analysing the arguments and conclusions of both the Analogies and the Postulates as well as the two Latin principles non (...)
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  3. added 2018-11-04
    Kant on Empirical Psychology and Experimentation.Michael Bennett McNulty - 2018 - In Violetta Waibel, Margit Ruffing & David Wagner (eds.), Natur und Freiheit: Akten des XII. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Berlin: De Gruyter. pp. 2707-2714.
  4. added 2018-03-05
    Kantian and Neo-Kantian First Principles for Physical and Metaphysical Cognition.Michael E. Cuffaro - unknown
    I argue that Immanuel Kant's critical philosophy—in particular the doctrine of transcendental idealism which grounds it—is best understood as an `epistemic' or `metaphilosophical' doctrine. As such it aims to show how one may engage in the natural sciences and in metaphysics under the restriction that certain conditions are imposed on our cognition of objects. Underlying Kant's doctrine, however, is an ontological posit, of a sort, regarding the fundamental nature of our cognition. This posit, sometimes called the `discursivity thesis', while considered (...)
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  5. added 2018-02-17
    Kant on Impenetrability, Touch, and the Causal Content of Perception.Colin Marshall - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1411-1433.
    It is well known that Kant claims that causal judgments, including judgments about forces, must have an a priori basis. It is less well known that Kant claims that we can perceive the repulsive force of bodies through the sense of touch. Together, these claims present an interpretive puzzle, since they appear to commit Kant to both affirming and denying that we can have perceptions of force. My first aim is to show that both sides of the puzzle have deep (...)
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  6. added 2018-02-17
    Forces and Causes in Kant’s Early Pre-Critical Writings.Eric Watkins - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (1):5-27.
    This paper considers Kant’s conception of force and causality in his early pre-Critical writings, arguing that this conception is best understood by way of contrast with his immediate predecessors, such as Christian Wolff, Alexander Baumgarten, Georg Friedrich Meier, Martin Knutzen, and Christian August Crusius, and in terms of the scientific context of natural philosophy at the time. Accordingly, in the True estimation Kant conceives of force in terms of activity rather than in terms of specific effects, such as motion. Kant’s (...)
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  7. added 2017-10-18
    Kant on Causal Knowledge: Causality, Mechanism and Reflective Judgment.Angela Breitenbach - 2011 - In Kenneth Allen & Tom Stoneham (eds.), Causation and Modern Philosophy. London: Routledge. pp. 201-219.
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  8. added 2017-08-31
    A Gradual Reformation: Empirical Character and Causal Powers in Kant.Jonas Jervell Indregard - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 48 (5):662-683.
    According to Kant each person has an empirical character, which is ultimately grounded in one’s free choice. The popular Causal Laws interpretation of empirical character holds that it consists of the causal laws governing our psychology. I argue that this reading has difficulties explaining moral change, the ‘gradual reformation’ of our empirical character: Causal laws cannot change and hence cannot be gradually reformed. I propose an alternative Causal Powers interpretation of empirical character, where our empirical character consists of our mind’s (...)
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  9. added 2017-02-09
    Self-Affection and Pure Intuition in Kant.Jonas Jervell Indregard - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (4):627-643.
    Are the pure intuitions of space and time, for Kant, dependent upon the understanding's activity? This paper defends the recently popular Self-Affection Thesis : namely, that the pure intuitions require an activity of self-affection—an influence of the understanding on the inner sense. Two systematic objections to this thesis have been raised: The Independence objection claims that SAT undermines the independence of sensibility; the Compatibility objection claims that certain features of space and time are incompatible with being the products of the (...)
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  10. added 2017-01-12
    Kant and the Demands of Self-Consciousness.Pierre Keller - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    In Kant and the Demands of Self-Consciousness, Pierre Keller examines Kant's theory of self-consciousness and argues that it succeeds in explaining how both subjective and objective experience are possible. Previous interpretations of Kant's theory have held that he treats all self-consciousness as knowledge of objective states of affairs, and also that self-consciousness can be interpreted as knowledge of personal identity. By developing this striking new interpretation Keller is able to argue that transcendental self-consciousness underwrites a general theory of objectivity and (...)
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  11. added 2016-12-12
    Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality.Eric Watkins - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about Kant's views on causality as understood in their proper historical context. Specifically, Eric Watkins argues that a grasp of Leibnizian and anti-Leibnizian thought in eighteenth-century Germany helps one to see how the critical Kant argued for causal principles that have both metaphysical and epistemological elements. On this reading Kant's model of causality does not consist of events, but rather of substances endowed with causal powers that are exercised according to their natures and circumstances. This innovative (...)
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  12. added 2016-12-08
    Noumenal Affection.Desmond Hogan - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (4):501-532.
    A central doctrine of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason holds that the content of human experience is rooted in an affection of sensibility by unknowable things in themselves. This famous and puzzling affection doctrine raises two seemingly intractable old problems, which can be termed the Indispensability and the Consistency Problems. By what right does Kant present affection by supersensible entities as an indispensable requirement of experience? And how could any argument for such indispensability avoid violating the Critique's doctrine of noumenal (...)
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  13. added 2016-12-08
    Review: Watkins, Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality. [REVIEW]Bryan Hall - 2007 - Kantian Review 12 (2):158-160.
  14. added 2016-12-05
    Problems From Kant.James Van Cleve - 1999 - Oup Usa.
    James Van Cleve examines the main topics from Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, such as transcendental idealism, necessity and analyticity, space and time, substance and cause, noumena and things-in-themselves, problems of the self, and rational theology. He also discusses the relationship between Kant's thought and that of modern anti-realists, such as Putnam and Dummett. Because Van Cleve focuses upon specific problems rather than upon entire passages or sections of the Critique, he makes Kant's work more accessible to the serious student (...)
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  15. added 2016-10-31
    Power, Harmony, and Freedom: Debating Causation in 18th Century Germany.Corey Dyck - forthcoming - In Frederick Beiser & Brandon Look (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Eighteenth Century German Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    As far as treatments of causation are concerned, the pre-Kantian 18th century German context has long been dismissed as a period of uniform and unrepentant Leibnizian dogmatism. While there is no question that discussions of issues relating to causation in this period inevitably took Leibniz as their point of departure, it is certainly not the case that the resulting positions were in most cases dogmatically, or in some cases even recognizably, Leibnizian. Instead, German theorists explored a range of positions regarding (...)
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  16. added 2016-05-04
    Forms of Judgment as a Link Between Mind and the Concepts of Substance and Cause.Srećko Kovač - 2014 - In Marek Rosiak & Miroslaw Szatkowski (eds.), Substantiality and Causality. De Gruyter. pp. 51-66.
  17. added 2016-01-20
    Freedom as a Kind of Causality.Toni Kannisto - forthcoming - In Violetta L. Waibel & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Akten des 12. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses “Natur und Freiheit” in Wien vom 21.–25. September 2015.
    Kant’s view that freedom is a “kind of causality” seems to conflict with his claim that the categories of the understanding – including causality – can only be applied objectively to sensible phaenomena, never to supersensible noumena, as freedom is only possible for the latter. I argue that only Kant’s theory of symbolic presentation, according to which the category of cause is applied merely analogically to freedom, can dispel this threatening inconsistency. Unlike it is commonly thought, one cannot here use (...)
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  18. added 2015-12-07
    Kant’s Causal Power Argument Against Empirical Affection.Jonas Jervell Indregard - 2017 - Kantian Review 22 (1):27-51.
    A well-known trilemma faces the interpretation of Kant’s theory of affection, namely whether the objects that affect us are empirical, noumenal, or both. I argue that according to Kant, the things that affect us and cause representations in us are not empirical objects. I articulate what I call the Causal Power Argument, according to which empirical objects cannot affect us because they do not have the right kind of power to cause representations. All the causal powers that empirical objects have (...)
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  19. added 2015-08-29
    Kant.Eric Watkins - 2009 - In Helen Beebee, Christopher Hitchcock & Peter Menzies (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Causation. Oxford University Press.
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  20. added 2015-08-26
    Review: Ertl, Wolfgang, Kants Auflösung der "dritten Antinomie". Zur Bedeutung des Schöpfungskonzepts für die Freiheitslehre[REVIEW]Frederick Rauscher - 2000 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 3.
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  21. added 2015-08-24
    Rehabilitating the Regulative Use of Reason: Kant on Empirical and Chemical Laws.Michael Bennett McNulty - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 54:1-10.
    In his Kritik der reinen Vernunft, Kant asserts that laws of nature “carry with them an expression of necessity”. There is, however, widespread interpretive disagreement regarding the nature and source of the necessity of empirical laws of natural sciences in Kant's system. It is especially unclear how chemistry—a science without a clear, straightforward connection to the a priori principles of the understanding—could contain such genuine, empirical laws. Existing accounts of the necessity of causal laws unfortunately fail to illuminate the possibility (...)
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  22. added 2015-08-24
    Kant on Causality, Freedom, and Objectivity.William L. Harper & Ralf Meerbote (eds.) - 1984 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    The eight papers in this book are drawn from two conferences that honored Lewis White Beck, an influential Kant scholar.
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  23. added 2015-08-23
    Kant's Phenomena: Extrinsic or Relational Properties? A Reply to Allais.Rae Langton - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):170–185.
    Kant’s claim that we are ignorant of things in themselves is a claim that we cannot know ‘the intrinsic nature of things’, or so at least I argued in Kantian Humility.2 I’m delighted to find that Lucy Allais is in broad agreement with this core idea, thinking it represents, at the very least, a part of Kant’s view. She sees some of the advantages of this interpretation. It has significant textual support. It does justice to Kant’s sense that we are (...)
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  24. added 2015-08-19
    Kantian Minds and Humean Minds: How to Read the Analogies of Experience in Reverse: Série 2.Robert Hanna - 2010 - Kant E-Prints 5:27-48.
    It is nowadays a commonplace of Kant-interpretation that Kant's response to Hume in the Analogies of Experience is not strictly speaking a refutation of Hume but in fact only an extended critical response to Hume's skeptical accounts of object-identity and causation, that also accepts many of Hume's working assumptions. But this approach can significantly underestimate the extent to which Kant's conception of the representational mind is radically distinct from Hume's. In particular, Kant's conception of the human mind's innately-specified spontaneous actions (...)
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  25. added 2015-08-09
    CHAPTER 2: Causation.Paul Guyer - 2009 - In Knowledge, Reason, and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume. Princeton University Press. pp. 71-123.
  26. added 2015-08-09
    CHAPTER 3: Cause, Object, and Self.Paul Guyer - 2009 - In Knowledge, Reason, and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume. Princeton University Press. pp. 124-160.
  27. added 2014-12-29
    Laws of Nature and Causal Necessity.Michael Friedman - 2014 - Kant-Studien 105 (4):531-553.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kant-Studien Jahrgang: 105 Heft: 4 Seiten: 531-553.
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  28. added 2014-12-20
    Kant's Anti-Determinism.Michael Rosen - 1988 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 89:125 - 141.
  29. added 2014-11-25
    „ “What is Time?”.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2014 - In Aaron Garrett (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Eighteenth Century Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 232-244.
    Time is one of the most enigmatic notions philosophers have ever dealt with. Once subjected to close examination, almost any feature usually ascribed to time, leads to a plethora of fundamental and hard to resolve questions. Just as philosophers of the eighteenth-century attempted to take account of revolutionary developments in the physical sciences in understanding space, life, and a host of other fundamental aspects of nature (see Jones, Gaukroger, and Smith in this volume) they also engaged in fundamental and fruitful (...)
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  30. added 2014-11-25
    Kant on Pure Reason.Ralph Charles Sutherland Walker (ed.) - 1982 - Oxford University Press.
  31. added 2014-11-11
    Hegel's Strategy. Hegel's Critique of Kant's Category of Causality.Elisa Magrì - 2013 - Philosophy@Lisbon 3 (2013):95-107.
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  32. added 2014-11-11
    Kant and Kantian Themes in Recent Analytic Philosophy.Robert Howell - 2013 - Metaphilosophy 44 (1-2):42-47.
    This article notes six advances in recent analytic Kant research: (1) Strawson's interpretation, which, together with work by Bennett, Sellars, and others, brought renewed attention to Kant through its account of space, time, objects, and the Transcendental Deduction and its sharp criticisms of Kant on causality and idealism; (2) the subsequent investigations of Kantian topics ranging from cognitive science and philosophy of science to mathematics; (3) the detailed work, by a number of scholars, on the Transcendental Deduction; (4) the clearer (...)
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  33. added 2014-11-11
    Kantian Causality and Quantum Quarks: The Compatibility Between Quantum Mechanics and Kant's Phenomenal World.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2013 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 28 (2):283-302.
    Quantum indeterminism seems incompatible with Kant’s defense of causality in his Second Analogy. The Copenhagen interpretation also takes quantum theory as evidence for anti-realism. This article argues that the law of causality, as transcendental, applies only to the world as observable, not to hypothetical objects such as quarks, detectable only by high energy accelerators. Taking Planck’s constant and the speed of light as the lower and upper bounds of observability provides a way of interpreting the observables of quantum mechanics as (...)
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  34. added 2014-11-11
    Kuszenie i wolna wola. O pewnym rozwiązaniu problemu natury relacji między ludzką wolnością a wszechwiedzą Boga.Stanisław Judycki - 2012 - Filo-Sofija 12 (19).
    Temptation and Free Will. A Solution to the Problem of the Relationship Between Human Free Will and God’s Omniscience The article aims to show that none of the today discussed positions concerning the relationship between human free will and God’s omniscience—determinism, compatibilism, molinism and libertarianian revisionism—is an adequate solution and proposes a position to some extent resembling Kant’s solution to his Third Antinomy, where he made the distinction between subject as causa phenomenon and subject as causanoumenon. God possesses not only (...)
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  35. added 2014-11-11
    Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: An Introduction and Interpretation.James R. O'Shea - 2012 - Routledge.
    Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason (1781) remains a landmark work of philosophy and one that most students will encounter at some point in their studies. At nearly seven hundred pages of detailed and complex argument it is a demanding and intimidating read. James O’Shea’s introduction to the Critique seeks to make it less so. Aimed primarily at students coming to the book for the first time, it provides step-by-step analysis in clear, unambiguous prose. The conceptual problems Kant sought to (...)
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  36. added 2014-11-11
    Kant and Hegel's Responses to Hume's Skepticism Concerning Causality: An Evolutionary Epistemological Perspective.Adam Christian Scarfe - 2012 - Cosmos and History 8 (1):227-288.
    According to Hume, determinations of necessary causal connection are without empirical warrant, but, as he maintains, the concept of causality qua necessary connection is indispensable to human beings, having survival value for them, a claim which points to the biological significance of this concept. In contrast to Hume, Kant argues that the causal principle qua necessary connection belongs to the a priori conceptual framework by which rational beings constitute their experience and render the world intelligible. In “Kant’s Doctrine of the (...)
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  37. added 2014-11-11
    Kants Modell Kausaler Beziehungen. Zu Watkins' Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality.Boris Hennig - 2011 - Kant-Studien 102 (3):367-384.
    Eric Watkins argues that according to Kant, causation is not a relation between two events, but a relation between the “causality” of a substance and an event. It is shown that his arguments are partly based on a confusion between causation and interaction. Further, Watkins claims that for Kant, causes cannot be temporally determined. If this were true, it would follow that there can be no causal chains, and that all factors that determine the time when an effect occurs do (...)
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  38. added 2014-11-11
    Kant's Transcendental Deduction and the Ghosts of Descartes and Hume.Corey W. Dyck - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (3):473-496.
    This paper considers how Descartes's and Hume's sceptical challenges were appropriated by Christian Wolff and Johann Nicolaus Tetens specifically in the context of projects related to Kant's in the transcendental deduction. Wolff introduces Descartes's dream hypothesis as an obstacle to his account of the truth of propositions, or logical truth, which he identifies with the 'possibility' of empirical concepts. Tetens explicitly takes Hume's account of our idea of causality to be a challenge to the `reality' of transcendent concepts in general, (...)
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  39. added 2014-11-11
    Persons as Causes in Kant.Wolfgang Ertl - 2010 - In Stephen R. Palmquist (ed.), Cultivating Personhood: Kant and Asian Philosophy. de Gruyter. pp. 217-230.
    Drawing on recent Aristotelian readings of Kant's notion of natural causality with an emphasis on substances as causes, I will try to explain how persons can make a difference in the world of appearances by virtue of their rationality. For Kant, the clue is that the peculiar mode of a substance's natural causality supervenes on in-itself features, among which is the mode or character of the person's rationality. Thus, a wedge can be driven between natural necessity and metaphysical necessity, opening (...)
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  40. added 2014-11-11
    The Intuition of Simultaneity: Zugleichsein and the Constitution of Extensive Magnitudes.Michael J. Olson - 2010 - Kant-Studien 101 (4):429-444.
    Kant's response to ‘Hume's problem’ in his analysis of the a priori structure of causality as law-governed succession in the Second Analogy of Experience has unquestionably overshadowed the account of simultaneity ( Zugleichsein ), which follows in the Third Analogy. The analysis of simultaneity in the first Critique relies entirely upon that of succession and is ultimately no more than a more complicated variant of the causal dependence of substances: two objects are experienced as simultaneous only when each of those (...)
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  41. added 2014-11-11
    The Kantian Framework of Complementarity.Michael Cuffaro - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 41 (4):309-317.
    A growing number of commentators have, in recent years, noted the important affinities in the views of Immanuel Kant and Niels Bohr. While these commentators are correct, the picture they present of the connections between Bohr and Kant is painted in broad strokes; it is open to the criticism that these affinities are merely superficial. In this essay, I provide a closer, structural, analysis of both Bohr's and Kant's views that makes these connections more explicit. In particular, I demonstrate the (...)
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  42. added 2014-11-11
    The Scope of Responsibility in Kant's Theory of Free Will.Benjamin Vilhauer - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (1):45-71.
    In this paper, I discuss a problem for Kant's strategy of appealing to the agent qua noumenon to undermine the significance of determinism in his theory of free will. I then propose a solution. The problem is as follows: given determinism, how can some agent qua noumenon be 'the cause of the causality' of the appearances of that agent qua phenomenon without being the cause of the entire empirical causal series? This problem has been identified in the literature (Ralph Walker (...)
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  43. added 2014-11-11
    Abraham, R. And Marsden, J.(1978), Foundations of Mechanics, New York/Reading, MA: Benjamin Cummings. Allison, H.(1994),“Causality and Causal Laws in Kant. A Critique of Michael Friedman”, In: P. Parrini (Ed.), Kant and Contemporary Epistemology, Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer. [REVIEW]H. Allison, A. Aspect, P. Grangier, G. Roger & S. Auyang - 2009 - In P. Kerszberg, J. Petitot & M. Bitbol (eds.), Constituting Objectivity. Transcendental Perspectives on Modern Physics. pp. 515.
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  44. added 2014-11-11
    Causality and Personal Causality in the Philosophy of Xavier Zubiri.Thomas B. Fowler - 2008 - The Xavier Zubiri Review 10:91 - 112.
    Causality has been a key concept throughout the history of philosophy. One of its main uses has been in securing proofs of the existence of God. A review of the history of causality discloses five distinct phases, with major changes to the uses and understanding of causality, with the last ending in a very confused idea of causality. Zubiri pointed out that there are really three elements conflated in the common idea of causality: real production of effects, functionality, and power (...)
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  45. added 2014-11-11
    E. Watkins, Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality.Ludovicus De Vos - 2006 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 68:624-626.
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  46. added 2014-11-11
    Eric Watkins, Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality Reviewed By.Alexander Rueger - 2006 - Philosophy in Review 26 (6):446-449.
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  47. added 2014-11-11
    Zasada teleologiczna w metodologii Kanta.Jerzy Sawicki - 2005 - Filo-Sofija 5 (1(5)):281-292.
    Author: Sawicki Jerzy Title: THELEOGICAL PRINCIPLE IN KANT’S METHODOLOGY (Zasada teleologiczna w metodologii Kanta) Source: Filo-Sofija year: 2005, vol:.5, number: 2005/1, pages: 281-292 Keywords: KANT, THELEOGICAL PRINCIPLE, FINALISM, MECHANICISM Discipline: PHILOSOPHY Language: POLISH Document type: ARTICLE Publication order reference (Primary author’s office address): E-mail: www:The work contains a concise of I. Kant’s views on the problem of the laws of nature and the theleological principle presented in this context, which Kant proposes in the character of a regulative methodological postulate. The (...)
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  48. added 2014-11-11
    Heisenberg and the Transformation of Kantian Philosophy.Kristian Camilleri - 2005 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 19 (3):271 – 287.
    In this paper, I argue that Heisenberg's mature philosophy of quantum mechanics must be understood in the context of his epistemological project to reinterpret and redefine Kant's notion of the a priori. After discussions with Weizsäcker and Hermann in Leipzig in the 1930s, Heisenberg attempted to ground his interpretation of quantum mechanics on what might be termed a 'practical' transformation of Kantian philosophy. Taking as his starting point, Bohr's doctrine of the indispensability of classical concepts, Heisenberg argued that concepts such (...)
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  49. added 2014-11-11
    Wie viel Substanz braucht Kant?Georg Sans - 2005 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 61 (3/4):707 - 730.
    Na primeira analogia da experiência, o locus classicus da sua teoria da substancialidade, Kant introduz a substância como algo que permanece através do tempo, como para compensar a alteração dos estados de consciência. O conflito de interpretações a propósito desta questão é provocado sobretudo pela questão de saber até que ponto Kant identifica este substrato permanente de todas as manifestações com a matéria no sentido físico do termo. Nesse sentido, o autor do presente artigo desenvolve um argumento em ordem a (...)
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  50. added 2014-11-11
    Kant and the Relationship of Causality in an Early Work by Maurice Blondel (1858).A. Fabriziani - 2004 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 59 (3):745-768.
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