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  1. added 2020-03-11
    What Real Progress has Metaphysics Made Since the Time of Kant? Kant and the Metaphysics of Grounding.Eric Watkins - forthcoming - Synthese:1-17.
    This paper argues that, despite appearances to the contrary, Kant and contemporary analytic metaphysicians are interested in the same kind of metaphysical dependence relation that finds application in a range of contexts and that is today commonly referred to as grounding. It also argues that comparing and contrasting Kant’s and contemporary metaphysicians’ accounts of this relation proves useful for both Kant scholarship and for contemporary metaphysics. The analyses provided by contemporary metaphysicians can be used to shed light on Kant’s understanding (...)
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  2. added 2020-01-31
    Eric Watkins, Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality. [REVIEW]Alexander Rueger - 2006 - Philosophy in Review 26 (6):446-449.
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  3. added 2019-11-05
    Every Man Has His Price: Kant's Argument for Universal Radical Evil.Jonas Jervell Indregard - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    Kant famously claims that we have all freely chosen evil. This paper offers a novel account of the much-debated justification for this claim. I reconstruct Kant’s argument from his affirmation that we all have a price – we can all succumb to temptation. I argue that this follows a priori from a theoretical principle of the Critique of Pure Reason, namely that all empirical powers have a finite, changeable degree, an intensive magnitude. Because of this, our reason can always be (...)
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  4. added 2019-10-07
    Reality in-Itself and the Ground of Causality.Christian Onof - 2019 - Kantian Review 24 (2):197-222.
    This article presents a metaphysical approach to the interpretation of the role of things-in-themselves in Kant’s theoretical philosophy. This focuses upon identifying their transcendental function as the grounding of appearances. It is interpreted as defining the relation of appearing as the grounding of empirical causality. This leads to a type of dual-aspect account that is given further support through a detailed examination of two sections of Kant’s first Critique. This shows the need to embed this dual-aspect account within a two-perspective (...)
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  5. added 2019-10-07
    XI.—Kant's First and Second Analogies of Experience.C. D. Broad - 1925 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 26 (1):189-210.
  6. added 2019-06-29
    Leaving the Enchanted World Behind: Kant on the Order of Nature, Empirical Space and the Possibility of Miracles.Pavel Reichl - 2019 - Kantian Review 24 (1):103-125.
    Despite relative neglect in the literature, Kant’s published and unpublished writings in theoretical philosophy reveal a sustained and at times ambivalent effort to come to terms with the problem of miracles. Because they entail a form of supernatural causation that undermines the law-governedness of the order of nature, miracles pose a significant problem for Kant’s metaphysics. I explore in detail Kant’s account of miracles in conjunction with the relevant aspects of his metaphysics of nature in order to establish in what (...)
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  7. added 2019-06-07
    Kants Auflösung der ‘Dritten Antinomie’: Zur Bedeutung des Schöpfungskonzepts Für Die Freiheitslehre. By Wolfgang Ertl. Symposion, 110; Freiburg: Verlag Karl Alber, 1998. 280pp. ISBN 3-495-478659-8. DM 78. [REVIEW]Brigitte Sassen - 2001 - Kantian Review 5:132-136.
  8. added 2019-06-06
    Kants Modell Kausaler Beziehungen. Zu Watkins' Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality.Boris Hennig - 2011 - Kant-Studien 102 (3):367-384.
    Eric Watkins argues that according to Kant, causation is not a relation between two events, but a relation between the “causality” of a substance and an event. It is shown that his arguments are partly based on a confusion between causation and interaction. Further, Watkins claims that for Kant, causes cannot be temporally determined. If this were true, it would follow that there can be no causal chains, and that all factors that determine the time when an effect occurs do (...)
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  9. added 2019-06-06
    Three Problems in Westphal's Transcendental Proof of Realism.Toni Kannisto - 2010 - Kant-Studien 101 (2):227-246.
    The debate on how to interpret Kant's transcendental idealism has been prominent for several decades now. In his book Kant's Transcendental Proof of Realism Kenneth R. Westphal introduces and defends his version of the metaphysical dual-aspect reading. But his real aim lies deeper: to provide a sound transcendental proof for realism, based on Kant's work, without resorting to transcendental idealism. In this sense his aim is similar to that of Peter F. Strawson – although Westphal's approach is far more sophisticated. (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    Kant on the Laws of Nature: Laws, Necessitation, and the Limitation of Our Knowledge.James Kreines - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (4):527-558.
    Consider the laws of nature—the laws of physics, for example. One familiar philosophical question about laws is this: what is it to be a law of nature? More specifically, is a law of nature a regularity, or a generalization stating a regularity? Or is it something else? Another philosophical question is: how, and to what extent, can we have knowledge of the laws of nature? I am interested here in Kant's answers to these questions, and their place within his broader (...)
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    Review Essay: Paul Guyer's, Knowledge, Reason, and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume. [REVIEW]Corey W. Dyck - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):613-619.
  12. added 2019-06-06
    “Whatever Begins to Be Must Have a Cause of Existence”: Hume’s Analysis and Kant's Response.Henry E. Allison - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):525-546.
  13. added 2019-06-06
    Incongruent Counterparts and Causality.Sean Walsh - 2007 - Kant-Studien 98 (4):418-430.
    Two puzzles with regard to the Kritik der reinen Vernunft are incongruent counterparts and causality. In De mundi sensibilis atque intelligibilis forma et principiis, Kant indicates that the experience of things like left and right hands, so-called incongruent counterparts, involve certain pure intuitions, and hence constitute one line of evidence for the claim that the concept of space itself is a pure intuition. In KrV, Kant again argues that the concept of space itself is a pure intuition, but does not (...)
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  14. added 2019-06-06
    Two Major Recent Approaches to Kant's Second Analogy.Gregg Osborne - 2006 - Kant-Studien 97 (4):409-429.
    The second analogy of experience is one of the most famous and crucial parts of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Despite 220 years of intense scrutiny and debate, however, no consensus has emerged as to the precise nature of its argument. A main source of disagreement in recent years has been the following question: With what is Kant concerned in this section? Is he concerned with necessary conditions of our believing in the first place that there has been a case (...)
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  15. added 2019-06-06
    Kant's Transcendental Proof of Realism, by Kenneth Westphal. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004, ISBN 0521833736, $80. [REVIEW]Bryan Hall - 2006 - Kantian Review 11:127-130.
  16. added 2019-06-06
    Kant’s Phenomena: Extrinsic or Relational Properties? A Reply to Allais.Rae Langton - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):170-185.
    Kant’s claim that we are ignorant of things in themselves is a claim that we cannot know ‘the intrinsic nature of things’, or so at least I argued in Kantian Humility.2 I’m delighted to find that Lucy Allais is in broad agreement with this core idea, thinking it represents, at the very least, a part of Kant’s view. She sees some of the advantages of this interpretation. It has significant textual support. It does justice to Kant’s sense that we are (...)
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  17. added 2019-06-06
    Kant, Causation, and FreedomKant and the Metaphysics of Causality.Robert Hanna - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (2):281-304.
    The trick, of course, is to pick your targets carefully: they should be central to the mainstream of contemporary philosophy, not marginal. Watkins has certainly done that. The target he has chosen is the problem of causation. His three-part aim is, first, to embed Kant’s theory of causation in its 18th century pre-Critical and especially Leibnizian setting; second, to argue that Kant’s Critical theory of causation is not in fact a reply to Hume, and that Kant’s metaphysics of causation depends (...)
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  18. added 2019-06-06
    Noumenal Will in Kant’s Theory of Action: Reasons and Causes as Intelligible Forms of Understanding.Pirmin Stekeler-Weithofer - 2003 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 24 (1):45-73.
    The following account of a Kantian theory of action, in which I do not proceed in accordance with just one text of Kant’s, has as its main aim a critical assessment of Kant’s ‘solution’ of the third antinomy, i.e., of the dilemma between the principle of causality in the domain of understanding nature and the cardinal proposition of free will in the domain of understanding action. According to the first horn of the dilemma, we assume that at least in principle (...)
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  19. added 2019-06-06
    Kant’s Changing Conception of the Causality of the Will.Charles Nussbaum - 1996 - International Philosophical Quarterly 36 (3):265-286.
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  20. added 2019-06-06
    Kant’s Argument for Causality in the Second Analogy.Gordon Steinhoff - 1994 - International Philosophical Quarterly 34 (4):465-480.
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  21. added 2019-06-06
    Naturnotwendigkeit und Freiheit. Zu Kants Theorie der Kausalität als Antwort auf Hume.Bernhard Rang - 1990 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 81 (1):24.
  22. added 2019-06-06
    Willkür und Wille bei Kant.Pirmin Stekeler-Weithofer - 1990 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 81 (3):304.
  23. added 2019-06-06
    Sense, Reason and Causality in Hume and Kant.A. T. Nuyen - 1990 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 81 (1):57.
    It is argued that Hume has two notions of causation, one psychological and the other philosophical. Kant's criticism of Hume overlooks the fact that Hume's scepticism is directed only at the latter. At the psychological level, Hume could have accepted Kant's argument without abandoning his own account of causation. The real difference between Hume and Kant is that Hume is not and Kant is concerned with the conditions for the possibility of sense experience. Hume is concerned only with the philosophical (...)
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  24. added 2019-06-06
    Kants Beweis des Kausalgesetzes.W. Brocker - 1987 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 78 (3):314.
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  25. added 2019-06-06
    Marcello Pera, "Hume, Kant E l'Induzione". [REVIEW]Maurice A. Finocchiaro - 1984 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (4):484.
  26. added 2019-06-06
    Kant on Pure Reason.Ralph Charles Sutherland Walker (ed.) - 1982 - Oxford University Press.
  27. added 2019-06-06
    Kant and Hume on Simultaneity of Causes and Effects.Robert J. Fogelin - 1976 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 67 (1):51.
  28. added 2019-06-06
    An Interpretation of Kant’s Causal Determinism.W. Michael Hoffman - 1975 - Idealistic Studies 5 (2):139-163.
    In the Transcendental Dialectic of the first Critique Kant sets forth the ancient problem of freedom and determinism by way of the Third Antinomy. The problem, according to Kant, arises out of a conflict of reason with itself as it seeks an unconditioned ground which will provide a unity for all conditions. In the thesis of the Third Antinomy reason sees the necessity of postulating a free causality “without which, even in the [ordinary] course of nature the series of appearances (...)
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  29. added 2019-06-05
    Kant and Hegel's Responses to Hume's Skepticism Concerning Causality: An Evolutionary Epistemological Perspective.Adam Christian Scarfe - 2012 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 8 (1):227-288.
    According to Hume, determinations of necessary causal connection are without empirical warrant, but, as he maintains, the concept of causality qua necessary connection is indispensable to human beings, having survival value for them, a claim which points to the biological significance of this concept. In contrast to Hume, Kant argues that the causal principle qua necessary connection belongs to the a priori conceptual framework by which rational beings constitute their experience and render the world intelligible. In “Kant’s Doctrine of the (...)
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  30. added 2019-06-05
    Kant, Hume and Causality.D. A. Rohatyn - 1975 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 6 (1):34-36.
    Kant's answer to Hume is seen to comprise the following: agreement with Hume that causal connection cannot be inferred from experience; moving beyond Hume in making causal conceptions presuppositions of experience ; distinguishing causality from other, more basic presuppositions of experience . Not only is causality a Verknuepfung, rather than a Bedingung, thereby relegating it to a lower level of generality, but its presence in the table of categories simply signifies the possibility of its application at any time, not the (...)
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  31. added 2019-05-10
    Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality, by Eric Watkins.Quassim Cassam - 2008 - European Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):330-332.
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  32. added 2019-04-20
    Wo Hat Kant Das Prinzip Vom Nomologischen Charakter der Kausalität Begründet?Geert Keil - 2001 - In Ralph Schumacher, Rolf-Peter Horstmann & Volker Gerhardt (eds.), Kant und die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des IX. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Bd. I: Hauptvorträge. Bd. Ii: Sektionen I-V. Bd. Iii: Sektionen Vi-X: Bd. Iv: Sektionen Xi-Xiv. Bd. V: Sektionen Xv-Xviii. Berlin: De Gruyter. pp. 562-571.
    Das allgemeine Kausalprinzip findet sich bei Kant in zwei Fassungen, einer gesetzesimplizierenden („Alles in der Welt geschieht nach Gesetzen der Natur“) und einer gesetzesneutralen („Alles, was geschieht, hat seine Ursache“). Äquivalent sind die beiden Fassungen nur unter einer bestimmten kausalitätstheoretischen Annahme, nämlich der des Prinzips vom nomologischen Charakter der Kausalität. Kant hat dieses Prinzip, demzufolge jede Kausalbeziehung zwischen zwei Einzelereignissen ein striktes Sukzessionsgesetz impliziert, angenommen, doch hat er es auch begründet? In diesem Beitrag wird die Auffassung ver-treten, daß Kant den (...)
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  33. added 2019-03-23
    Kant on Reality, Cause, and Force: From the Early Modern Tradition to the Critical Philosophy. [REVIEW]Nabeel Hamid - 2018 - The Leibniz Review 28:119-122.
  34. added 2019-03-23
    Kant on the Laws of Nature: Restrictive Inflationism and Its Philosophical Advantages.James Kreines - 2017 - The Monist 100 (3):326-341.
  35. added 2019-03-22
    Kant and Crusius on Causal Chains.Michael Oberst - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (1):107-128.
    There are two rival models on how to interpret causal chains in Kant. Traditional event-event models take it that events are causes of events, which are in turn causes of other events. Watkins’s causal powers interpretation, on the contrary, has it that substances have unchangeable grounds, and the series of events is only a series within the effect. By comparing Kant to Crusius, I argue that, to some extent, both approaches can be combined. For the powers of substances are made (...)
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  36. added 2019-02-22
    A Guide to Ground in Kant's Lectures on Metaphysics.Nicholas Stang - 2019 - In Courtney Fugate (ed.), Kant's Lectures on Metaphysics: A Critical Guide. pp. 74–101.
    While scholars have extensively discussed Kant’s treatment of the Principle of Sufficient Ground in the Antinomies chapter of the Critique of Pure Reason, and, more recently, his relation to German rationalist debates about it, relatively little has been said about the exact notion of ground that figures in the PSG. My aim in this chapter is to explain Kant’s discussion of ground in the lectures and to relate it, where appropriate, to his published discussions of ground.
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  37. added 2018-12-11
    Epistemic Normativity in Kant's “Second Analogy”.James Hutton - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):593-609.
    In the “Second Analogy,” Kant argues that, unless mental contents involve the concept of causation, they cannot represent an objective temporal sequence. According to Kant, deploying the concept of causation renders a certain temporal ordering of representations necessary, thus enabling objective representational purport. One exegetical question that remains controversial is this: how, and in what sense, does deploying the concept of cause render a certain ordering of representations necessary? I argue that this necessitation is a matter of epistemic normativity: with (...)
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  38. added 2018-12-08
    Kant on the Necessity of Causal Relations.Toni Kannisto - 2017 - Kant-Studien 108 (4):495-516.
    There are two traditional ways to read Kant's claim that every event necessarily has a cause: the weaker every-event some-cause and the stronger same-cause same-effect causal principles. The focus of the debate about whether and where he subscribes to the SCP has been in the Analogies in the Critique of Pure Reason and in the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science. By analysing the arguments and conclusions of both the Analogies and the Postulates as well as the two Latin principles non (...)
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  39. added 2018-11-04
    Kant on Empirical Psychology and Experimentation.Michael Bennett McNulty - 2018 - In Violetta Waibel, Margit Ruffing & David Wagner (eds.), Natur und Freiheit: Akten des XII. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Berlin: De Gruyter. pp. 2707-2714.
  40. added 2018-03-05
    Kantian and Neo-Kantian First Principles for Physical and Metaphysical Cognition.Michael E. Cuffaro - manuscript
    I argue that Immanuel Kant's critical philosophy—in particular the doctrine of transcendental idealism which grounds it—is best understood as an `epistemic' or `metaphilosophical' doctrine. As such it aims to show how one may engage in the natural sciences and in metaphysics under the restriction that certain conditions are imposed on our cognition of objects. Underlying Kant's doctrine, however, is an ontological posit, of a sort, regarding the fundamental nature of our cognition. This posit, sometimes called the `discursivity thesis', while considered (...)
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  41. added 2018-02-17
    Kant on Impenetrability, Touch, and the Causal Content of Perception.Colin Marshall - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1411-1433.
    It is well known that Kant claims that causal judgments, including judgments about forces, must have an a priori basis. It is less well known that Kant claims that we can perceive the repulsive force of bodies through the sense of touch. Together, these claims present an interpretive puzzle, since they appear to commit Kant to both affirming and denying that we can have perceptions of force. My first aim is to show that both sides of the puzzle have deep (...)
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  42. added 2018-02-17
    Forces and Causes in Kant’s Early Pre-Critical Writings.Eric Watkins - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (1):5-27.
    This paper considers Kant’s conception of force and causality in his early pre-Critical writings, arguing that this conception is best understood by way of contrast with his immediate predecessors, such as Christian Wolff, Alexander Baumgarten, Georg Friedrich Meier, Martin Knutzen, and Christian August Crusius, and in terms of the scientific context of natural philosophy at the time. Accordingly, in the True estimation Kant conceives of force in terms of activity rather than in terms of specific effects, such as motion. Kant’s (...)
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  43. added 2017-10-18
    Kant on Causal Knowledge: Causality, Mechanism and Reflective Judgment.Angela Breitenbach - 2011 - In Kenneth Allen & Tom Stoneham (eds.), Causation and Modern Philosophy. London: Routledge. pp. 201-219.
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  44. added 2017-08-31
    A Gradual Reformation: Empirical Character and Causal Powers in Kant.Jonas Jervell Indregard - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 48 (5):662-683.
    According to Kant each person has an empirical character, which is ultimately grounded in one’s free choice. The popular Causal Laws interpretation of empirical character holds that it consists of the causal laws governing our psychology. I argue that this reading has difficulties explaining moral change, the ‘gradual reformation’ of our empirical character: Causal laws cannot change and hence cannot be gradually reformed. I propose an alternative Causal Powers interpretation of empirical character, where our empirical character consists of our mind’s (...)
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  45. added 2017-02-09
    Self-Affection and Pure Intuition in Kant.Jonas Jervell Indregard - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (4):627-643.
    Are the pure intuitions of space and time, for Kant, dependent upon the understanding's activity? This paper defends the recently popular Self-Affection Thesis : namely, that the pure intuitions require an activity of self-affection—an influence of the understanding on the inner sense. Two systematic objections to this thesis have been raised: The Independence objection claims that SAT undermines the independence of sensibility; the Compatibility objection claims that certain features of space and time are incompatible with being the products of the (...)
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  46. added 2017-01-12
    Kant and the Demands of Self-Consciousness.Pierre Keller - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    In Kant and the Demands of Self-Consciousness, Pierre Keller examines Kant's theory of self-consciousness and argues that it succeeds in explaining how both subjective and objective experience are possible. Previous interpretations of Kant's theory have held that he treats all self-consciousness as knowledge of objective states of affairs, and also that self-consciousness can be interpreted as knowledge of personal identity. By developing this striking new interpretation Keller is able to argue that transcendental self-consciousness underwrites a general theory of objectivity and (...)
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  47. added 2016-12-12
    Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality.Eric Watkins - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about Kant's views on causality as understood in their proper historical context. Specifically, Eric Watkins argues that a grasp of Leibnizian and anti-Leibnizian thought in eighteenth-century Germany helps one to see how the critical Kant argued for causal principles that have both metaphysical and epistemological elements. On this reading Kant's model of causality does not consist of events, but rather of substances endowed with causal powers that are exercised according to their natures and circumstances. This innovative (...)
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  48. added 2016-12-08
    Noumenal Affection.Desmond Hogan - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (4):501-532.
    A central doctrine of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason holds that the content of human experience is rooted in an affection of sensibility by unknowable things in themselves. This famous and puzzling affection doctrine raises two seemingly intractable old problems, which can be termed the Indispensability and the Consistency Problems. By what right does Kant present affection by supersensible entities as an indispensable requirement of experience? And how could any argument for such indispensability avoid violating the Critique's doctrine of noumenal (...)
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  49. added 2016-12-08
    Review: Watkins, Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality. [REVIEW]Bryan Hall - 2007 - Kantian Review 12 (2):158-160.
  50. added 2016-12-05
    Problems From Kant.James Van Cleve - 1999 - Oup Usa.
    James Van Cleve examines the main topics from Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, such as transcendental idealism, necessity and analyticity, space and time, substance and cause, noumena and things-in-themselves, problems of the self, and rational theology. He also discusses the relationship between Kant's thought and that of modern anti-realists, such as Putnam and Dummett. Because Van Cleve focuses upon specific problems rather than upon entire passages or sections of the Critique, he makes Kant's work more accessible to the serious student (...)
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