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  1. Kant on Representing Negative States of Affairs.Hemmo Laiho - 2020 - Topoi 39 (3):715-726.
    In this paper, I investigate Kant’s view of the cognitive role of perceptions, judgements, and the three categories of Quality in representing negative states of affairs. The paper addresses the following problem. In his account of empirical cognition, Kant seems to limit the legitimate application of the categories to things perceptually available to us, or, more generally, to positive cases. However, Kant also seems to hold that negative states of affairs, such as the absence of a thing, cannot be perceived. (...)
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  2. On the Transcendental Freedom of the Intellect.Colin McLear - 2020 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):35-104.
    Kant holds that the applicability of the moral ‘ought’ depends on a kind of agent-causal freedom that is incompatible with the deterministic structure of phenomenal nature. I argue that Kant understands this determinism to threaten not just morality but the very possibility of our status as rational beings. Rational beings exemplify “cognitive control” in all of their actions, including not just rational willing and the formation of doxastic attitudes, but also more basic cognitive acts such as judging, conceptualizing, and synthesizing.
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  3. Die Spontaneität des Verstandes.Mario Schärli - 2018 - In Violetta Waibel, Margit Ruffing & David Wagner (eds.), Natur und Freiheit. Akten des XII. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Berlin / Boston: pp. 1385–1394.
  4. The Case for Absolute Spontaneity in Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason.Addison Ellis - 2017 - Con-Textos Kantianos (6):138-164.
    Kant describes the understanding as a faculty of spontaneity. What this means is that our capacity to judge what is true is responsible for its own exercises, which is to say that we issue our judgments for ourselves. To issue our judgments for ourselves is to be self-conscious – i.e., conscious of the grounds upon which we judge. To grasp the spontaneity of the understanding, then, we must grasp the self-consciousness of the understanding. I argue that what Kant requires for (...)
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  5. Judging for Reasons: On Kant and the Modalities of Judgment.Jessica Leech - 2017 - In Andrew Stephenson & Anil Gomes (eds.), Kant and the Philosophy of Mind: Perception, Reason, and the Self.
    What, if any, is the relation between modal judgment and our capacity to make judgments at all? On a plausible interpretation, Kant connects what he calls the modality of a judgment to its location in a course of reasoning: actual inferential relations between that act of judgment and others. There is a puzzling consequence of this interpretation. It is natural to understand Kant as claiming that every judgment has some modality. However, if the modality of a judgment is its location (...)
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  6. Kant's Radical Subjectivism. Perspectives on the Transcendental Deduction.Dennis Schulting - 2017 - London, UK: Palgrave-Macmillan.
  7. Kant on Infinite and Negative Judgements: Three Interpretations, Six Tests, No Clear Result.Mark Siebel - 2017 - Topoi 39 (3):699-713.
    In his table of judgements, Kant added infinity as a third quality. An infinite judgement ‘All S are non-P’ is said to differ from the affirmative ‘All S are P’ because it ascribes a negative predicate; and it differs from the negative ‘No S is P’ because it has a richer content. The present paper puts three interpretations of this surplus content to six tests. Among other things, it is examined whether these interpretations marry up with Kant’s solution to the (...)
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  8. Kant on Necessity, Insight, and A Priori Knowledge.James Hebbeler - 2015 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 97 (1):34-65.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie Jahrgang: 97 Heft: 1 Seiten: 34-65.
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  9. Kant's Logic and the Completeness of His Table of Judgments.Hyoung Sung Kim - 2015 - Dissertation, Georgia State University
    Kant famously claims his table of judgments is complete. However, Kant does not provide a demonstration of his claim of completeness. In fact, he does not seem to think that a proof of completeness is necessary. I argue that we can reconstruct a demonstration that Kant would accept once we reflect upon his notion of a disjunctive judgment.
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  10. Kant on the Logical Origin of Concepts.Alexandra Newton - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):456-484.
    In his lectures on general logic Kant maintains that the generality of a representation (the form of a concept) arises from the logical acts of comparison, reflection and abstraction. These acts are commonly understood to be identical with the acts that generate reflected schemata. I argue that this is mistaken, and that the generality of concepts, as products of the understanding, should be distinguished from the classificatory generality of schemata, which are products of the imagination. A Kantian concept does not (...)
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  11. Definitions of Kant’s Categories.Tyke Nunez - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (5-6):631-657.
    The consensus view in the literature is that, according to Kant, definitions in philosophy are impossible. While this is true prior to the advent of transcendental philosophy, I argue that with Kant's Copernican Turn definitions of some philosophical concepts, the categories, become possible. Along the way I discuss issues like why Kant introduces the ‘Analytic of Concepts’ as an analysis of the understanding, how this faculty, as the faculty for judging, provides the principle for the complete exhibition of the categories, (...)
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  12. Kant y el problema de la geometría.José Manuel Osorio - 2014 - Estudios de Filosofía: Revista del Seminaro de Filosofia del instituto Riva-Aguero 12:56-72.
    Geometry is an a priori science. However, its apriority is saddled with problems. The aim of this paper will be to show 1) how Kant understands that the contents of geometry are synthetic a priori judgments in the Critique of Pure Reason, and 2) if it’s still relevant to study Kant’s theory of geometry after the challenges posed by non-Euclidian theories of space. With respect to point 1: Kant understands geometry as the discipline that objectifies the pure intuition of space. (...)
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  13. The Significance of Self‐Consciousness in Idealist Theories of Logic.Robert Pippin - 2014 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 114 (2pt2):145-166.
    Among Kant's innovations in the understanding of logic (‘general logic’) were his claims that logic had no content of its own, but was the form of the thought of any possible content, and that the unit of meaning, the truth-bearer, judgement, was essentially apperceptive. Judging was implicitly the consciousness of judging. This was for Kant a logical truth. This article traces the influence of the latter claim on Fichte, and, for most of the discussion, on Hegel. The aim is to (...)
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  14. From the Clarity of Ideas to the Validity of Judgments: Kant’s Farewell to Epistemic Perfectionism.Konstantin Pollok - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):18-35.
    Against the standard interpretation of Kant's ‘Copernican revolution’ as the prioritization of epistemology over ontology, I argue in this paper that his critique of traditional metaphysics must be seen as a farewell to the perfectionism on which early modern rationalist ontology and epistemology are built. However, Kant does not simply replace ‘perfection’ with another fundamental concept of normativity. More radically, Kant realizes that it is not simply ideas but only the relation of ideas that can be subject to norms, and (...)
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  15. The Second Step of the B‐Deduction.Frederick Rauscher - 2014 - European Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):396-419.
    This paper offers a new interpretation of Kant's puzzling claim that the B-Deduction in the Critique of Pure Reason should be considered as having two main steps. Previous commentators have tended to agree in general on the first step as arguing for the necessity of the categories for possible experience, but disagree on what the second step is and whether Kant even needs a second step. I argue that the two parts of the B-Deduction correspond to the two aspects of (...)
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  16. Leslie Stevenson: Inspirations From Kant. Essays, OUP 2011. [REVIEW]Christian Helmut Wenzel - 2014 - Mind 123 (490):644-649.
  17. Intuition and Judgment: How Not to Think About the Singularity of Intuition.Thomas Land - 2013 - In Stefano Bacin, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Kant and Philosophy in a Cosmopolitan Sense. de Gruyter. pp. vol. 2, 221-231.
    According to a widely held view, a Kantian intuition functions like a singular term. I argue that this view is false. Its apparent plausibility, both textual and philosophical, rests on attributing to Kant a Fregean conception of judgment. I show that Kant does not hold a Fregean conception of judgment and argue that, as a consequence, intuition cannot be understood on analogy with singular terms.
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  18. The Significance of Infinite Judgment.Camilla Serck-Hanssen - 2013 - In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. pp. 409-420.
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  19. From Kant to Husserl: Selected Essays.Charles Parsons - 2012 - Harvard University Press.
    The transcendental aesthetic -- Arithmetic and the categories -- Remarks on pure natural science -- Two studies in the reception of Kant's philosophy of arithmetic: postscript to part I -- Some remarks on Frege's conception of extension -- Postscript to essay 5 -- Frege's correspondence: postscript to essay 6 -- Brentano on judgment and truth -- Husserl and the linguistic turn.
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  20. Kant on Complete Determination and Infinite Judgement.Nicholas F. Stang - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1117-1139.
    In the Transcendental Ideal Kant discusses the principle of complete determination: for every object and every predicate A, the object is either determinately A or not-A. He claims this principle is synthetic, but it appears to follow from the principle of excluded middle, which is analytic. He also makes a puzzling claim in support of its syntheticity: that it represents individual objects as deriving their possibility from the whole of possibility. This raises a puzzle about why Kant regarded it as (...)
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  21. Kant’s Analytic-Geometric Revolution.Scott Heftler - 2011 - Dissertation, University of Texas at Austin
    In the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant defends the mathematically deterministic world of physics by arguing that its essential features arise necessarily from innate forms of intuition and rules of understanding through combinatory acts of imagination. Knowing is active: it constructs the unity of nature by combining appearances in certain mandatory ways. What is mandated is that sensible awareness provide objects that conform to the structure of ostensive judgment: “This (S) is P.” -/- Sensibility alone provides no such objects, so (...)
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  22. Kant's Thinker.Patricia Kitcher - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Overview -- Locke's internal sense and Kant's changing views -- Personal identity amd its problems -- Rationalist metaphysics of mind -- Consciousness, self-consciousness, and cognition -- Strands of Argument in the Duisburg Nachlass -- A transcendental deduction for a priori concepts -- Synthesis : why and how? -- Arguing for apperception -- The power of apperception -- "I-think" as the destroyer of rational psychology -- Is Kant's theory consistent? -- The normativity objection -- Is Kant's thinker (as such) a free (...)
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  23. Two Studies in the Reception of Kant's Philosophy of Arithmetic.Charles Parsons - 2010 - In Michael Friedman, Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (eds.), Discourse on a New Method: Reinvigorating the Marriage of History and Philosophy of Science. Open Court.
  24. Absolute Positing, the Frege Anticipation Thesis, and Kant's Definitions of Judgment.Timothy Rosenkoetter - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 18 (4):539-566.
    Abstract: Kant follows a substantial tradition by defining judgment so that it must involve a relation of concepts, which raises the question of why he thinks that single-term existential judgments should still qualify as judgments. There is a ready explanation if Kant is somehow anticipating a Fregean second-order account of existence, an interpretation that is already widely held for separate reasons. This paper examines Kant's early (1763) critique of Wolffian accounts of existence, finding that it provides the key idea in (...)
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  25. Reinscribing the «Λογωσ» in Transcendental Logic: Kant’s Highest Principle of Synthetic Judgments Revisited.Frank Schalow - 2009 - Existentia 19 (3-4):205-224.
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  26. Kant's Theory of Judgment.Robert Hanna - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  27. Are Kantian Analytic Judgments About Objects?Timothy Rosenkoetter - 2008 - In Valerio Rohden, Ricardo R. Terra, Guido A. Almeida & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Recht Und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants. de Gruyter. pp. vol. 5, 1-191.
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  28. Sull'interpretazione coerentista della concezione kantiana della verità.Alberto Vanzo - 2008 - Studi Kantiani 21:77-95.
    This paper argues that Kant, in his Critical period, did not have a coherence theory of truth. The paper outlines three coherence theories of truth and two coherence theories of empirical truth that Kant might have adopted. The three theories of truth are incompatible with Kant's texts. The two theories of empirical truth are compatible with the texts. However, there are no convincing reasons to hold that Kant adopted those theories.
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  29. Intuition and Concrete Particularity in Kant's Transcendental Aesthetic.Adrian Margaret Smith Piper - 2006 - In Francis Halsall, Julia Jansen & Tony O'Connor (eds.), Rediscovering Aesthetics: Transdisciplinary Voices from Art History, Philosophy, and Art Practice. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. pp. 193-212.
    By transcendental aesthetic, Kant means “the science of all principles of a priori sensibility” (A 21/B 35). These, he argues, are the laws that properly direct our judgments of taste (B 35 – 36 fn.), i.e. our aesthetic judgments as we ordinarily understand that notion in the context of contemporary art. Thus the first part of the Critique of Pure Reason, entitled the Transcendental Aesthetic, enumerates the necessary presuppositions of, among other things, our ability to make empirical judgments about particular (...)
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  30. Kant on Apperception and the Unity of Judgment.Timothy Rosenkoetter - 2006 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 49 (5):469-489.
  31. Kant on the Human Standpoint.Béatrice Longuenesse - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this collection of essays Béatrice Longuenesse considers the three aspects of Kant's philosophy, his epistemology and metaphysics of nature, his moral philosophy and his aesthetic theory, under one unifying standpoint: Kant's conception of our capacity to form judgements. She argues that the elements which make up our cognitive access to the world - what Kant calls the 'human point of view' - have an equally important role to play in our moral evaluations and our aesthetic judgements. Her discussion ranges (...)
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  32. Os problemas da razão pura e a semântica transcendental.Zeljko Loparic - 2005 - Doispontos 2 (2).
    O presente artigo tem como objetivo mostrar que a teoria kantiana da possibilidade de juízos a priori, o conteúdo essencial da sua crítica da razão pura, foi elaborada no intuito de garantir a solubilidade dos problemas necessários da razão pura e que essa teoria pode ser interpretada como uma semântica transcendental (a priori). The problems of pure reason and the transcendental semanticsThis article aims at showing that Kant´s theory of possibility of a priori judgments, which is the essential content of (...)
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  33. Kant’s Conception of Analytic Judgment.Ian Proops - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (3):588–612.
    In the 'Critique of Pure Reason' Kant appears to characterize analytic judgments in four distinct ways: once in terms of “containment,” a second time in terms of “identity,” a third time in terms of the explicative–ampliative contrast, and a fourth time in terms of the notion of “cognizability in accordance with the principle of contradiction.” The paper asks: Which of these characterizations—or apparent characterizations—best captures Kant’s conception of analyticity in the first Critique? It suggests: “the second.” It argues, further, that (...)
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  34. Transcendental Deduction of Predicative Structure in Kant and Brandom.Sebastian Rödl - 2005 - Pragmatics and Cognition 13 (1):91-107.
    Fregean predicates applied to Fregean objects are merely defined by a `timeless' deductive order of sentences. They cannot provide sufficient structure in order to explain how names can refer to objects of intuition and how predicates can express properties of substances that change in time. Therefore, the accounts of Wilson and Quine, Prior and Brandom for temporal judgments fail — and a new reconstruction of Kant's transcendental logic, especially of the analogies of experience, is needed.
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  35. Kant’s Theory of A Priori Knowledge. [REVIEW]Jill Vance Buroker - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (1):165-166.
    According to Greenberg, most commentators have misunderstood Kant’s purpose and method in the Critique of Pure Reason, as well as his underlying ontology. To correct these errors, Greenberg defends four theses. First, Kant is concerned only with a priori and not empirical knowledge in the Critique. Second, Kant’s underlying ontology consists of a monism of “things.” Third, the table of the logical functions of judgement is not drawn from general logic, because these functions have a “content.” And fourth, the deduction (...)
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  36. Kant’s Theory of A Priori Knowledge. [REVIEW]Jill Vance Buroker - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (1):165-167.
  37. How Are Synthetic a Priori Judgments Possible? The Conditions and Process of Empirical Knowledge in Kant.Claudio La Rocca - 2004 - Quaestio 4 (1):265-294.
  38. The Determinate-Indeterminate Distinction and Kants Theory of Judgment.Seung-Kee Lee - 2004 - Kant-Studien 95 (2):204-225.
  39. Les concepts a priori kantiens et leur destin.Béatrice Longuenesse - 2004 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 4 (44):485-510.
    Kant soutient qu'une table complète et systématique des catégories peut être établie selon le « fil conducteur » des fonctions logiques du jugement. La première partie de cet article est une exposition de l'argument kantien. La deuxième partie est un examen de quelques-unes des objections formulées à l'encontre du « fil conducteur » de Kant. Je conclus que l'appropriation contemporaine de la doctrine kantienne des catégories est désormais divisée entre deux problèmes distincts : celui du contenu conceptuel (ou non) de (...)
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  40. Jugement et existence chez Kant. Comment des jugements d’existence sont-ils possibles?Jocelyn Benoist - 2003 - Quaestio 3 (1):207-228.
  41. Can Transcendental Epistemology Be Naturalized?Quassim Cassam - 2003 - Philosophy 78 (2):181-203.
    Transcendental epistemology is an inquiry into conditions of human knowledge which reflect the structure of the human cognitive apparatus. The dependence thesis is the thesis that a proper investigation of such conditions must lean in important respects on the deliverances of science. I argue that Kant is right to object to the dependence thesis, but that the best objections to this thesis lead to the conclusion that the conditions of knowledge which Kant identifies are not, in any interesting sense, a (...)
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  42. Kant's Philosophy of Geometry.William Mark Goodwin - 2003 - Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    In my dissertation, I argue that contemporary interpretive work on Kant's philosophy of geometry has failed to understand properly the diagrammatic aspects of Euclidean reasoning. Attention to these aspects is amply repaid, not only because it provides substantial insight into the role of intuition in Kant's philosophy of mathematics, but also because it brings out both the force and the limitations of Kant's philosophical account of geometry. ;Kant characterizes the predecessors with which he was engaged as agreeing that mathematical judgments (...)
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  43. Kant's Theory of A Priori Knowledge (Review).Richard E. Aquila - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (2):267-268.
    Richard E. Aquila - Kant's Theory of A Priori Knowledge - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.2 267-268 Book Review Kant's Theory of A Priori Knowledge Robert Greenberg. Kant's Theory of A Priori Knowledge. University Park: Penn State University Press, 2001. Pp. ix + 278. Cloth, $45.00. This is one of the deepest and most carefully reasoned books on Kant I have read. It is a book for the scholar of the first (...)
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  44. Variaciones modales en la apropiación del conocimiento: sobre las fuentes a priori y a posteriori de la necesidad y la contingencia en Kant.Alvaro López Fernández - 2002 - Thémata: Revista de Filosofía 28:107-124.
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  45. Kant’s Theory of A Priori Knowledge.Robert Hanna - 2002 - Mind 111 (443):671-675.
  46. Review: Longuenesse, Kant and the Capacity to Judge[REVIEW]Eric Watkins - 2001 - Kantian Review 5:128-131.
  47. Kant's Categories and the Capacity to Judge: Responses to Henry Allison and Sally Sedgwick.Beatrice Longuenesse - 2000 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 43 (1):91 – 110.
    In response to Henry Allison's and Sally Sedwick's comments on my recent book, Kant and the Capacity to Judge, I explain Kant's description of the understanding as being essentially a "capacity to judge", and his view of the relationship between the categories and the logical functions of judgment. I defend my interpretation of Kant's argument in the Transcendental Deduction of the Categories in the B edition. I conclude that, in my interpretation, Kant's notions of the "a priori" and the "given" (...)
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  48. Longuenesse on Kant and the Priority of the Capacity to Judge.Sally Sedgwick - 2000 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 43 (1):81 – 90.
    In her book Kant and the Capacity to Judge, Be ´atrice Longuenesse makes two apparently incompatible claims about the status of the categories in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. On the one hand, the categories, in her words,?result from [the] activity of generating and combining concepts according to logical forms of judgment? and are thus?in no way prior to the act of judging?. On the other, they guide the unity which must be produced in the sensible manifold before any combination (...)
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  49. Review. Possible Experience: Understanding Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. AW Collins.Leslie Stevenson - 2000 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (3):535-538.
  50. Kant and the Capacity to Judge.Kenneth R. Westphal & Beatrice Longuenesse - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (4):645.
    Kant famously declares that “although all our cognition commences with experience, … it does not on that account all arise from experience”. This marks Kant’s disagreement with empiricism, and his contention that human knowledge and experience require both sensation and the use of certain a priori concepts, the Categories. However, this is only the surface of Kant’s much deeper, though neglected view about the nature of reason and judgment. Kant holds that even our a priori concepts are acquired, not from (...)
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