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Kantian Ethics

Edited by Sven Nyholm (Eindhoven University of Technology)
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  1. Henry E. Allison (2001). Ethics, Evil, and Anthropology in Kant: Remarks on Allen Wood's "Kant's Ethical Thought". [REVIEW] Ethics 111 (3):594-613.
  2. Margaret C. Amig (1926). Kant's "Empty" Moral Law. International Journal of Ethics 37 (1):94-100.
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  3. Margaret C. Amig (1926). Kant's "Empty" Moral Law. Ethics 37 (1):94.
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  4. Margaret C. Amig (1926). Kant's "Empty" Moral Law. International Journal of Ethics 37 (1):94-100.
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  5. R. W. Beardsmore (1969). Consequences and Moral Worth. Analysis 29 (6):177 - 186.
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  6. Robert J. Benton (1978). The Transcendental Argument in Kant's Groundwork. Journal of Value Inquiry 12 (3).
  7. Betzler Monika (2008). Kant on Respect, Dignity, and the Duty of Respect. In Monika Betzler (ed.), Kant's Ethics of Virtue. Walter de Gruyter.
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  8. Jill Vance Buroker (1984). Incongruence and the Unity of Transcendental Idealism: Reply to Allison. Topoi 3 (2):177-180.
    This article responds to henry allison's criticisms of the author's claim that kant's incongruent counterparts argument supports his critical conclusions that things in themselves must be both non-Spatial and unknowable. The first part of the article treats four objections allison raises. The second part discusses differences between allison's and the author's readings of kant's claims about things in themselves.
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  9. A. Campbell Garnett (1964). A New Look at the Categorical Imperative. Memorias Del XIII Congreso Internacional de Filosofía 7:229-236.
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  10. Matthew Caswell (2014). Book Review: Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant, Written by Joël Madore. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4):547-550.
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  11. J. E. Creighton (1921). Reason and Feeling. Philosophical Review 30 (5):465-481.
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  12. Stephen P. Engstrom (2009). VI. The Categorical Imperative. In The Form of Practical Knowledge: A Study of the Categorical Imperative. Harvard University Press. pp. 149-183.
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  13. John Martin Fischer & Joseph Raz (1989). The Morality of Freedom. Philosophical Review 98 (2):254.
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  14. Elena Irrera (2016). Joachim Aufderheide and Ralf M. Bader : The Highest Good in Aristotle and Kant. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (3):813-815.
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  15. Seung-Kee Lee (2004). Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (4):569-574.
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  16. Ping-cheung Lo (1981). A Critical Reevaluation of the Alleged "Empty Formalism" of Kantian Ethics. Ethics 91 (2):181-201.
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  17. John Marshall (1989). The Syntheticity of the Categorical Imperative. Proceedings of the Sixth International Kant Congress 2 (2):185-200.
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  18. E. F. Mettrick (1930). Kant's Conception of God: A Critical Exposition of Its Metaphysical Development Together with a Translation of the Nova DilucidatioF. E. England. International Journal of Ethics 40 (4):560-560.
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  19. Thaddeus Metz (2016). Toward an African Moral Theory (Revised Edition). In Isaac Ukpokolo (ed.), Themes, Issues and Problems in African Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 97-119.
    A mildly revised version of an article first published in the Journal of Political Philosophy (2007).
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  20. Kate Moran (ed.) (forthcoming). Freedom and Spontaenity in Kant. Cambridge University Press.
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  21. Sven Nyholm (2015). 2 Reinterpreting the Universal Law Formula. In Revisiting Kant's Universal Law and Humanity Formulas. De Gruyter. pp. 25-69.
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  22. M. C. Otto (1926). Kant on the Moral LifeJ. W. Scott. International Journal of Ethics 36 (2):210-213.
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  23. Marijan Pavčnik (2015). The Symbolic Meaning of Radbruch’s Formula. Statutory Law and the Argument of Non-Law. Rechtstheorie 46 (2):139-150.
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  24. S. Radakrishnan (1911). The Ethics of the Bhagavadgita and Kant. Ethics 21 (4):465.
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  25. S. Radakrishnan (1911). The Ethics of the Bhagavadgita and Kant. International Journal of Ethics 21 (4):465-475.
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  26. Shyam Ranganathan (2016). Kantian Ethics: Indian Responses (Ethics-1, M24). In A. Raghuramaraju (ed.), Philosophy, E-PG Pathshala. Delhi: India, Department of Higher Education (NMEICT).
    In this lesson, I review critical responses to Kant that can be understood as having non-Western, Indian roots. One criticism is articulated by the famous contemporary moral philosopher, Thomas Nagel. While Nagel is not a Buddhist, his criticism of Kant’s ethics is Buddhist in essence. The other response is based on an appreciation of the philosophy of Yoga. Yoga and Kantian thought are both versions of a kind of moral philosophy, which we could call Explanatory Dualism. Moreover, Yoga and Kantian (...)
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  27. Hans Reiner (1983). Duty and Inclination: The Fundamentals of Morality Discussed and Redefined with Special Regard to Kant and Schiller. Distributors, Kluwer Boston.
  28. J. B. Schneewind (2004). Comments on the Commentaries. Utilitas 16 (2):184-192.
    Adams 's suggestion that there must be one really right way of presenting the history of moral philosophy seems implausible to me, so I reject – with additional reasons – his charges against the structure of Invention of Autonomy. Skorupski's way of stating the ‘equal moral abilities’ thesis is not, I argue, very Kantian; a more Kantian version is not open to his objections. I am unconvinced by Schultz's claim that Sidgwick did not really hold that thesis. Deigh raises questions (...)
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  29. Schönecker Dieter & Horn Christoph (2006). Deriving the Formula of Humanity. In Dieter Schönecker & Christoph Horn (eds.), Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals. Walter de Gruyter.
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  30. Schönecker Dieter & Horn Christoph (2006). How is a Categorical Imperative Possible? In Dieter Schönecker & Christoph Horn (eds.), Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals. Walter de Gruyter.
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  31. Schönecker Dieter & Horn Christoph (2006). The Categorical Imperative and Universalizability. In Dieter Schönecker & Christoph Horn (eds.), Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals. Walter de Gruyter.
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  32. John R. Silber (1963). The Importance of the Highest Good in Kant's Ethics. Ethics 73 (3):179-197.
    Lewis white beck's "a commentary on kant's critique of practical reason" overlooks the fact that some of the ideas most important to kant's ethics are not presented in the second "critique". It also lacks a necessary emphasis on the notion of the highest good, The unifying theme of the work as a whole. The author traces the role of this concept throughout the second "critique" and shows how kant developed the content of the idea of the highest good in the (...)
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  33. Marcus G. Singer (1983). Reconstructing the Groundwork. Ethics 93 (3):566-578.
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  34. Nancy E. Snow (1999). Nancy Sherman: Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (1):127-130.
  35. John Edward Taylor (1998). Kant and Aquinas on Emotion and Virtuous Action. Dissertation, Stanford University
    In this study, I seek to understand the role of emotion in virtuous action according to Kant and Aquinas by asking how they would regard two common claims: namely, the claim that emotions help to motivate virtuous action and the claim that emotions help us to discern what we ought to do. ;After an introductory section, I examine Kant's and Aquinas' stance toward the emotional motivation thesis , which states that at least for some virtues, an action cannot be fully (...)
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  36. Radoslav A. Tsanoff (1932). Lectures on EthicsImmanuel Kant. International Journal of Ethics 43 (1):104-106.
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  37. Dietmar von der Pfordten (2015). On Kant's Concept of Law. Archiv fuer Rechts- und Sozialphilosphie 101 (2):191-201.
    The article aims to clarify Kant's concept of law, which he developed in the “Metaphysische Anfangsgründe der Rechtslehre” from 1797. Decisive for Kant's concept of law is the distinction between internal and external relations of persons. Law is restricted to external relations. So the crucial question is: Where does Kant draw the line between internal and external relations? Four possibilities are analysed in an order of increasing extent: only causal consequences of our actions in the external world beyond our bodies; (...)
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  38. Jeppe von Platz (forthcoming). Singularity Without Equivalence: The Complex Unity of Kant’s Categorical Imperative. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-16.
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  39. P. B. M. Vranas (2011). New Foundations for Imperative Logic: Pure Imperative Inference. Mind 120 (478):369-446.
    Imperatives cannot be true, but they can be obeyed or binding: `Surrender!' is obeyed if you surrender and is binding if you have a reason to surrender. A pure declarative argument — whose premisses and conclusion are declaratives — is valid exactly if, necessarily, its conclusion is true if the conjunction of its premisses is true; similarly, I suggest, a pure imperative argument — whose premisses and conclusion are imperatives — is obedience-valid (alternatively: bindingness-valid) exactly if, necessarily, its conclusion is (...)
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  40. Peter B. M. Vranas (2010). In Defense of Imperative Inference. Journal of Philosophical Logic 39 (1):59 - 71.
    "Surrender; therefore, surrender or fight" is apparently an argument corresponding to an inference from an imperative to an imperative. Several philosophers, however (Williams 1963; Wedeking 1970; Harrison 1991; Hansen 2008), have denied that imperative inferences exist, arguing that (1) no such inferences occur in everyday life, (2) imperatives cannot be premises or conclusions of inferences because it makes no sense to say, for example, "since surrender" or "it follows that surrender or fight", and (3) distinct imperatives have conflicting permissive presuppositions (...)
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Categorical and Hypothetical Imperatives
  1. Binod Agarwala (2004). Phronesis and Categorical Imperative. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 31 (1-4):119.
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  2. Maike Albertzart (2011). Missing the Target: Jonathan Dancy’s Conception of a Principled Ethics. Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (1):49-58.
  3. John Alexander (2005). Did God Violate the Categorical Imperative? Philosophy Pathways 108.
  4. E. Allison Henry (2011). Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals: A Commentary. Oxford University Press.
    Henry E. Allison presents a comprehensive commentary on Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals . Allison pays special attention to the structure of the work and its historical and intellectual context. He argues that, despite its relative brevity, the Groundwork is the single most important work in modern moral philosophy.
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  5. Henry E. Allison (2013). The Singleness of the Categorical Imperative. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. pp. 37-54.
  6. Chrisoula Andreou (2007). Non-Relative Reasons and Humean Thought: If What is a Reason for You is a Reason for Me, Where Does That Leave the Humean? Metaphilosophy 38 (5):654-668.
    A variety of strategies have been used to oppose the influential Humean thesis that all of an agent’s reasons for action are provided by the agent’s current wants. Among these strategies is the attempt to show that it is a conceptual truth that reasons for action are non-relative. I introduce the notion of a basic reason- giving consideration and show that the non-relativity thesis can be understood as a corollary of the more fundamental thesis that basic reason-giving considerations are generalizable. (...)
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  7. Chrisoula Andreou (2006). Might Intentions Be the Only Source of Practical Imperatives? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (3):311-325.
    I focus on the broadly instrumentalist view that all genuine practical imperatives are hypothetical imperatives and all genuine practical deliberation is deliberation from existing motivations. After indicating why I see instrumentalism as highly plausible, I argue that the most popular version of instrumentalism, according to which genuine practical imperatives can take desires as their starting point, is problematic. I then provide a limited defense of what I see as a more radical but also more compelling version of instrumentalism. According to (...)
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  8. Tom P. S. Angier (ed.) (2012). Ethics: The Key Thinkers. Continuum.
    Plato Tom Angier -- Aristotle Timothy Chappell -- Stoics Jacob Klein -- Aquinas Vivian Boland O.P -- Hume Peter Millican -- Kant Ralph Walker -- Hegel Kenneth Westphal -- Marx Sean Sayers -- Mill Krister Bykvist -- Nietzsche Ken Gemes and Christoph Schuringa -- Macintyre David Solomon.
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  9. Stefano Bacin (2011). Imperativo. Guida.
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  10. Dennis J. Baker (2008). The Harm Principle Vs. Kantian Criteria for Ensuring Fair, Principled and Just Criminalisation. Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 33 (66):66-99.
    In this paper, I consider Ripstein and Dan-Cohen's critiques of the 'harm principle'. Ripstein and Dan-Cohen have asserted that the harm principle should be jettisoned, because it allegedly fails to provide a rationale for criminalising certain harmless wrongs that ought to be criminalised. They argue that Kant's second formulation of the categorical imperative and his concept of 'external freedom' are better equipped for ensuring that criminalisation decisions meet the requirements of fairness. Per contra, I assert that Kant's deontological theory is (...)
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