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  1. Kant: Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science.Immanuel Kant - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Kant was centrally concerned with issues in the philosophy of natural science throughout his career. The Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science presents his most mature reflections on these themes in the context of both his 'critical' philosophy, presented in the Critique of Pure Reason, and the natural science of his time. This volume presents a translation by Michael Friedman which is especially clear and accurate. There are explanatory notes indicating some of the main connections between the argument of the Metaphysical (...)
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  2. Michael J. Crowe, "The Extraterrestrial Life Debate, 1750-1900. The Idea of a Plurality of Worlds From Kant to Lowell". [REVIEW]Lewis White Beck - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (2):324.
  3. ‘This Inscrutable Principle of an Original Organization’: Epigenesis and ‘Looseness of Fit’ in Kant’s Philosophy of Science.John H. Zammito - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (1):73-109.
    Kant’s philosophy of science takes on sharp contour in terms of his interaction with the practicing life scientists of his day, particularly Johann Blumenbach and the latter’s student, Christoph Girtanner, who in 1796 attempted to synthesize the ideas of Kant and Blumenbach. Indeed, Kant’s engagement with the life sciences played a far more substantial role in his transcendental philosophy than has been recognized hitherto. The theory of epigenesis, especially in light of Kant’s famous analogy in the first Critique, posed crucial (...)
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  4. The Critique of Pure Reason and Physics.W. H. Werkmeister - 1977 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 68 (1):33.
  5. Anthropology From a Kantian Point of View: Toward a Cosmopolitan Conception of Human Nature.Robert B. Louden - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):515-522.
    Anthropology was a new field of study when Kant first began lecturing on it in 1772, and Kant himself was the first academic to teach regular courses in this area. As is well known, his own approach to anthropology is self-described as ‘pragmatic’, and Kant’s pragmatic anthropology differs markedly from the anthropologies that other early contributors to the new discipline were advocating. In this essay I focus on a fundamental feature of Kant’s anthropology that has been under-appreciated in previous discussions; (...)
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  6. A Text Of Two Titles: Kant’s ‘A Renewed Attempt to Answer the Question: “Is the Human Race Continually Improving?’’’.John H. Zammito - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):535-545.
    The essay, ‘A renewed attempt to answer the question: “Is the human race continually improving?”’ appeared as Part II of Kant’s 1798 publication, The conflict of the faculties, where it was subordinated under a second title: ‘The conflict of the philosophy faculty with the faculty of law’. How did this new situation affects the meaning of the essay? My argument considers first, the conflict of the faculty of philosophy with the faculty of law; second, the earlier philosophy of history Kant (...)
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  7. Kant’s Answer to the Question ‘What is Man?’ and its Implications for Anthropology.Alix A. Cohen - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):506-514.
    This paper examines Kant’s anthropological project and its relationship to his conception of ‘man’ in order to show that Kant’s answer to the question ‘what is man?’ entails a decisive re-evaluation of traditional conceptions of human nature. I argue that Kant redirects the question ‘what is man?’ away from defining man in terms of what he is, and towards defining him in terms of what he does, in particular through the distinction between three levels of what I will call ‘man’s (...)
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  8. Kant’s Transcendental and Empirical Psychology of Cognition.Claudia M. Schmidt - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):462-472.
    One of the perennially intriguing questions regarding Kant’s approach to the human sciences is the relation between his ‘transcendental psychology’ and empirical cognitive psychology. In this paper I compare his analysis of the a priori conditions of human cognition in the Critique of pure reason with his empirical account of the human cognitive faculties in his Anthropology from a pragmatic point of view. In comparing his approach to self-consciousness, sensibility, imagination, and understanding in these two works, I argue that Kant (...)
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  9. A Double Edged Sword? Kant's Refutation Of Mendelssohn's Proof Of The Immortality Of The Soul And Its Implications For His Theory Of Matter.Lorne Falkenstein - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (4):561-588.
  10. Kant’s Anti-Mechanism and Kantian Anti-Mechanism.Robert Hanna - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 46 (1):112-116.
  11. Kant on Geometrical Intuition and the Foundations of Mathematics.Frode Kjosavik - 2009 - Kant-Studien 100 (1):1-27.
    It is argued that geometrical intuition, as conceived in Kant, is still crucial to the epistemological foundations of mathematics. For this purpose, I have chosen to target one of the most sympathetic interpreters of Kant's philosophy of mathematics – Michael Friedman – because he has formulated the possible historical limitations of Kant's views most sharply. I claim that there are important insights in Kant's theory that have survived the developments of modern mathematics, and thus, that they are not so intrinsically (...)
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  12. Kant’s Natural Teleology? The Case of Physical Geography.Robert R. Clewis - 2016 - Kant-Studien 107 (2):314-342.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kant-Studien Jahrgang: 107 Heft: 2 Seiten: 314-342.
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  13. Michael Friedman and Alfred Nordmann , The Kantian Legacy in Nineteenth-Century Science. Cambridge, MA and London: MIT Press, 2006. Pp. Iv+370. ISBN 0-262-06254-2. £29.95. [REVIEW]Kenneth Caneva - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Science 41 (2):307-308.
  14. Kant and Blumenbach on the Bildungstrieb: A Historical Misunderstanding.Robert J. Richards - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 31 (1):11-32.
  15. Kant on Epigenesis, Monogenesis and Human Nature: The Biological Premises of Anthropology.Alix A. Cohen - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (4):675-693.
    The aim of this paper is to show that for Kant, a combination of epigenesis and monogenesis is the condition of possibility of anthropology as he conceives of it and that moreover, this has crucial implications for the biological dimension of his account of human nature. More precisely, I begin by arguing that Kant’s conception of mankind as a natural species is based on two premises: firstly the biological unity of the human species (monogenesis of the human races); and secondly (...)
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  16. Kant: Natural Science Eric Watkins The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Immanuel Kant, Cambridge University Press, 2012, 818pp., £94 HB ISBN: 9780521363945. [REVIEW]Michela Massimi - 2015 - Philosophy 90 (1):143-146.
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  17. A Companion to Kant.Graham Bird (ed.) - 2006 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This _Companion_ provides an authoritative survey of the whole range of Kant’s work, giving readers an idea of its immense scope, its extraordinary achievement, and its continuing ability to generate philosophical interest. Written by an international cast of scholars Covers all the major works of the critical philosophy, as well as the pre-critical works Subjects covered range from mathematics and philosophy of science, through epistemology and metaphysics, to moral and political philosophy.
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  18. Biological Purposiveness and Analogical Reflection.Angela Breitenbach - 2014 - In Eric Watkins & Ina Goy (eds.), Kant's Theory of Biology. De Gruyter. pp. 131-148.
  19. Kant on the Idea of Science.Pierre Kerszberg - 2013 - In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. pp. 101-112.
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  20. Mathematics, Metaphysics and Intuition in Kant.Emily Carson - 1996 - Dissertation, Harvard University
    This thesis attempts to argue against an influential interpretation of Kant's philosophy of mathematics according to which the role of pure intuition is primarily logical. Kant's appeal to pure intuition, and consequently his belief in the synthetic character of mathematics, is, on this view, a result of the limitations of the logical resources available in his time. In contrast to this, a reading is presented of the development of Kant's philosophy of mathematics which emphasises a much richer philosophical role for (...)
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  21. Kant as a Natural Philosopher.G. F. Becker - 1898 - Philosophical Review 7:657.
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  22. Explanation and the Dimensionality of Space: Kant’s Argument Revisited.Silvia De Bianchi & J. D. Wells - 2015 - Synthese 192 (1):287-303.
    The question of the dimensionality of space has informed the development of physics since the beginning of the twentieth century in the quest for a unified picture of quantum processes and gravitation. Scientists have worked within various approaches to explain why the universe appears to have a certain number of spatial dimensions. The question of why space has three dimensions has a genuinely philosophical nature that can be shaped as a problem of justifying a contingent necessity of the world. In (...)
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  23. Conceptual Change and the Philosophy of Science: Alternative Interpretations of the a Priori.David J. Stump - 2015 - Routledge.
    In this book, David Stump traces alternative conceptions of the a priori in the philosophy of science and defends a unique position in the current debates over conceptual change and the constitutive elements in science. Stump emphasizes the unique epistemological status of the constitutive elements of scientific theories, constitutive elements being the necessary preconditions that must be assumed in order to conduct a particular scientific inquiry. These constitutive elements, such as logic, mathematics, and even some fundamental laws of nature, were (...)
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  24. Russell's Principles of Mathematics and the Revolution in Marburg Neo-Kantianism.Thomas Oberdan - 2014 - Perspectives on Science 22 (4):523-544.
    Marburg Neo-Kantianism has attracted substantial interest among contemporary philosophers drawn by its founding idea that the success of advanced theoretical science is a given fact and it is the task of philosophical inquiry to ground the objectivity of scientific achievement in its a priori sources (Cohen and Natorp 1906, p. i). The Marburg thinkers realized that recent advances and developments in the mathematical sciences had changed the character of Kant’s transcendental project, demanding new methods and approaches to establish the objectivity (...)
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  25. Bernard Bolzano: Theory of Science.Paul Rusnock & Rolf George (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    This is the first full English translation of Bernard Bolzano's masterwork, the Theory of Science (1837)--a monumental and revolutionary study in logic, epistemology, heuristics, and scientific methodology. Each volume includes an introduction which illuminates the historical context of Bolzano's work and its continuing relevance.
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  26. Kant on Proper Science: Biology in the Critical Philosophy and the Opus Postumum.Hein van den Berg - 2014 - Springer Science + Business Media.
    Biology in the Critical Philosophy and the Opus postumum Hein van den Berg. Parts of Chap. 2 have been previously published in Hein van den Berg (2011), “ Kant's Conception of Proper Science.” Synthese 183 (1): 7–26. Parts of Chap.
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  27. O gemüt E as doenças da cabeça: O lado obscuro da antropologia.Jorge Conceição - 2014 - Philósophos - Revista de Filosofia 19 (1):63-96.
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  28. The Construction of Empirical Concepts and the Establishment of the Real Possibility of Empirical Lawlikeness in Kant's Philosophy of Science.Jennifer McRobert - 1987 - Dissertation, Dalhousie University
    In Chapter I, I discuss Buchdahl’s view that the possibility of empirical lawlikeness could not have been established in the Principles of the Critique given the differences between transcendental, metaphysical and empirical lawlikeness, and the connection between the faculty of Reason and empirical lawlikeness. I then discuss the general conditions for empirical hypotheses according to Kant, which include the justification of the method by which an empirical hypothesis is obtained and the establishment of the general and specific constructability of the (...)
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  29. Kant’s Emergence and Sellarsian Cognitive Science.Richard McDonough - 2014 - Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):44-53.
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  30. The Laws of Motion From Newton to Kant.Eric Watkins - 1997 - Perspectives on Science 5:311-348.
  31. Kant and the Sciences.Martin Schonfeld - 2003 - Mind 112 (447):579-583.
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  32. Leibniz, Kant and the Quantum-A Provocative Point of View About Observation, Space-Time, and the Mind-Body Issue.Massimo Pauri - 2000 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 215:257-282.
  33. The Concepts of Immanuel Kant's Natural Philosophy (1747-1780): A Database Rendering Their Explicit and Implicit Networks. [REVIEW]Wolfgang Lefèvre & Falk Wunderlich - 2001 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 220:267-281.
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  34. Ubiquity of Philosophy-Science and Sciences in Neokantianism.E. W. Orth - 2002 - Kant-Studien 93 (1):113-121.
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  35. Organisms and the Unity of Science.Paul Guyer - 2001 - In Eric Watkins (ed.), Kant and the Sciences. Oxford University Press. pp. 259--281.
  36. Kant, Cognitive Science and Contemporary Neo-Kantianism.Andrew Brook - 2004 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (10-11):10-11.
    Through nineteenth-century intermediaries, the model of the mind developed by Immanuel Kant has had an enormous influence on contemporary cognitive research. Indeed, Kant could be viewed as the intellectual godfather of cognitive science. In general structure, Kant's model of the mind shaped nineteenth-century empirical psychology and, after a hiatus during which behaviourism reigned supreme , became influential again toward the end of the twentieth century, especially in cognitive science. Kantian elements are central to the models of the mind of thinkers (...)
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  37. Hegel's Critique of Kant in the Realm of Natural Philosophy.A. Doz - 1999 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 53 (210):537-553.
  38. The Wolffian Roots of Kant’s Teleology.Hein van den Berg - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):724-734.
    Kant’s teleology as presented in the Critique of Judgment is commonly interpreted in relation to the late eighteenth-century biological research of Johann Friedrich Blumenbach. In the present paper, I show that this interpretative perspective is incomplete. Understanding Kant’s views on teleology and biology requires a consideration of the teleological and biological views of Christian Wolff and his rationalist successors. By reconstructing the Wolffian roots of Kant’s teleology, I identify several little known sources of Kant’s views on biology. I argue that (...)
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  39. Mecanismo y teleología en la Lógica de Hegel.Edgar Maraguat - 2013 - Dianoia 58 (70):59-87.
    ¿Cómo hay que entender la tesis de Hegel en la Lógica de que "la teleología es la verdad del mecanismo"? La afirmó contra Kant, desde luego; a saber, contra la posibilidad de que lo que parece teleológico sea sólo mecánico; pero no en el sentido de un compromiso dogmático con la realidad de fines naturales y tampoco en el de una refutación del mecanicismo como la que Fichte busca con su radicalización de la filosofía trascendental. Aquí se examina qué posibilidades (...)
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  40. Kant’s Critique of Leibniz’s Rejection of Real Opposition.Henry Michael Southgate - 2013 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):91-134.
  41. La Moral En la Era de Las Ciencias Naturales. Una Introducción Herética a la Crítica de la Razón Pura de Kant.Otfried Höffe - 2006 - Signos Filosóficos 8 (16):9-22.
    In this article we emphasize the relevance of the Critique of Pure Reason for modern thought and proposes an unorthodox reading of this work that, apart from the ortodox reading that centers itself primarily on the theoretical problems relative to knowledge, priviliges the rol of morality as a det..
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  42. Mary Domski and Michael Dickson, Eds. , Discourse on a New Method. Reinvigorating the Marriage of History and Philosophy of Science . Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Giacomo Borbone - 2011 - Philosophy in Review 31 (4):264-266.
  43. Language and Reality: Peter Mittelstaedt’s Contributions to the Philosophy of Physics.Brigitte Falkenburg - 2010 - Foundations of Physics 40 (9-10):1171-1188.
    The article investigates the way in which Peter Mittelstaedt has been contributing to the philosophy of physics for half a century. It is shown that he pursues a path between rationalism and empiricism in the sense of Erhard Scheibe’s philosophy of the physicists. Starting from Kant’s a priori he gives a rational reconstruction of the conceptual revolutions of 20th century physics. The central topic of his philosophy of physics is the quest for semantic self-consistency, which for quantum mechanics is a (...)
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  44. Die „Kräfte des Organischen“.Mathias Grote - 2005 - Cultura 2 (2):7-25.
    The so-called .Karlsschulrede. (1793) of the German naturalist Carl Friedrich Kielmeyer can be considered as a keystone to the understanding of"Naturphilosophie" both in German idealism (Schelling) and the romantic period.Kielmeyer's work considers life as the result of specific forces in the organic realm and thereby searches to explain the harmony of organic existence anddevelopment. Taking into account Kant.s outlines for a lifescience in the "Kritik der Urteilskraft" (1790), Kielmeyer's notion of teleological processes in nature is sketched. The historical and epistemological (...)
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  45. The Harmony Principle.C. K. Raju - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (4):586-604.
    I once wrote to Daya ji about what seemed to me a paradox in contemporary Indian philosophy. It is one thing that Indian philosophers in academia do not engage with science, or even with its history and philosophy. It is quite another thing that they do not engage with ethics. Ethics, after all, is at the core of philosophy. Without an ethical principle one often does not know how to respond to something fundamentally new, such as the bewildering variety of (...)
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  46. The Relevance of Kant’s Philosophy for Nineteenth Century Sciences.Michela Massimi - 2008 - Metascience 17 (1):79-83.
  47. Urbild Und Abbild. Leibniz, Kant Und Hausdorff Über Das Raumproblem.Marco Giovanelli - 2010 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 41 (2):283-313.
    The article attempts to reconsider the relationship between Leibniz’s and Kant’s philosophy of geometry on the one hand and the nineteenth century debate on the foundation of geometry on the other. The author argues that the examples used by Leibniz and Kant to explain the peculiarity of the geometrical way of thinking are actually special cases of what the Jewish-German mathematician Felix Hausdorff called “transformation principle”, the very same principle that thinkers such as Helmholtz or Poincaré applied in a more (...)
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  48. The Contingency of Laws of Nature in Science and Theology.Lydia Jaeger - 2010 - Foundations of Physics 40 (9-10):1611-1624.
    The belief that laws of nature are contingent played an important role in the emergence of the empirical method of modern physics. During the scientific revolution, this belief was based on the idea of voluntary creation. Taking up Peter Mittelstaedt’s work on laws of nature, this article explores several alternative answers which do not overtly make use of metaphysics: some laws are laws of mathematics; macroscopic laws can emerge from the interplay of numerous subsystems without any specific microscopic nomic structures (...)
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  49. Mankind and its Histories: William Robertson, Georg Forster, and a Late Eighteenth-Century German Debate.László Kontler - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (3):411-429.
    The Scottish historian William Robertson's works on European encounter with non-European civilizations (History of America, 1777; Historical Disquisition [?] of India, 1791) received a great deal of attention in contemporary Germany. Through correspondence with Robertson, as well as by reviewing and translating his texts, Johann Reinhold Forster and his son Georg took an active part in this process. The younger Forster also became simultaneously involved in a debate which was unfolding on the German intellectual scene concerning the different or equal (...)
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  50. Why Mathematical Chemistry Cannot Copy Mathematical Physics and How to Avoid the Imminent Epistemological Pitfalls.Joachim Schummer - 2012 - Hyle 18 (1):71 - 89.
    This paper argues that mathematical chemistry (MC) cannot just imitate mathematical physics (MP) but needs to develop its own interdisciplinary approach to avoid predictable obstacles. Although Kant's dictum that chemistry does not lend itself to mathematical treatment was already refuted during his own lifetime, any useful combination of mathematics and chemistry essentially differs from MP. While the latter has a longstanding disciplinary tradition of its own, MC requires true interdisciplinary work and needs to bridge two fundamentally different methodological traditions. I (...)
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